Appendix A – Program Portfolios and Results

Highlights of Recently Closed Compacts

Lesotho

The $362.6 million Lesotho Compact is designed to provide strategic investments to increase the availability of water for households and industrial use, test watershed management and conservation methods, rehabilitate health infrastructure and strengthen health systems, and remove barriers to foreign and local private sector investment.

Lesotho
Policy Reforms
  • MCC’s Compact influenced the passage of a new Land Act and implementing regulations that includes provisions establishing greater land tenure security for all land occupants ensuring gender equity in land ownership and land transactions and is congruent with the Legal Capacity of Married Persons Act; removing ministerial consent on mortgages, which significantly decreased mortgage processing times. Additionally, Lesotho passed the Land Administration Authority Act to carry out land administration in Lesotho. This new authority has already showed early gains in customer satisfaction and land transaction processing times.
  • The compact includes a Gender Equality and Economic Rights activity, which focuses on supporting the policy environment and increasing awareness of the Legal Capacity of Married Persons Act. This Act was passed during compact development and removes the minority status of married women. It also gives women several new rights, including the right to enter into contracts, register immovable property in their name and act as a director of companies.
Outputs

Health Sector Project

  • MCC is improving Lesotho’s health care infrastructure through rehabilitation and construction of 138 health centers, including the provision of new staff housing, 14 outpatient departments, a new blood transfusion center and central laboratory, and residences to accommodate National Health Training College students. The project is expected to benefit over 750,000 people who will have access to better health services.
  • Almost 200 health facility personnel were trained in infection, prevention and control. More than 60 community facilitators were also trained.
  • The project has coordinated with and leveraged resources from the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Irish Aid and the World Bank to support compact investments in Lesotho’s health sector.

Private Sector Development Project

  • As of July 2013, the project regularized over 15,000 land parcels. The project plans to regularize 55,000 land parcels by the end of the compact closure period.

Water Sector Project

  • A total of approximately 30,000 households across all ten districts in the country will receive ventilated improved pit latrines, with over 17,000 constructed to-date.
  • Out of a total 173.67 existing kilometers of pipes, the urban and peri-urban water supply project has extended and rehabilitated a combined 143.7 kilometers. The remaining construction is expected to be completed by the end of the compact closure period.
Preliminary and Expected Outcomes

Health Sector Project

  • Utilization of health centers providing HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and maternal and child health services is expected to increase.

Private Sector Development Project

  • Through operationalization of the small claims procedure, approximately 50 percent (or 561 out of 1,141) of the cases being filed have been resolved to date, up from 0% of cases resolved through the court prior to the compact. The procedure reduces the burden on the magistrate court and makes court more accessible to claimants with limited resources.
  • As of December 2012, more than 8,500 women in Lesotho now hold titles to land, compared to 3,200 pre-intervention. By the end of the compact, this number is expected to be over 20,000.
  • The number of new mortgage bonds has grown significantly from the streamlining of legislation and procedures by the Land Act and new Land Administration Authority. Mortgages more than doubled from 160 per year in 2008 to approximately 330 in fiscal year 2012.

Water Sector Project

  • Construction and rehabilitation of reservoirs, pump stations, treatment plants and reticulation is expected to improve access to potable drinking water for 124,248 people in urban and peri-urban areas of Lesotho and another 112,626 people in rural areas of the country. Over 10% of Lesotho’s population of approximately two million are expected to benefit from compact investments in the water sector.
  • To-date, 123 out of 250 planned new water systems have been completed, bringing water closer to people. A closer water source means that women and girls, in particular, are expected to have more time that can be used for other productive activities.
Evaluations

Health Sector Project

  • The Health Sector project will be covered by a performance evaluation assessing the various components of the health project individually and also how they contributed to a strengthened health system overall. MCC expects the final report in 2015.

Private Sector Development Project

  • The Land Administration Reform Impact activity is covered by impact and performance evaluations. The impact evaluation focuses on the effects of leasing and formalization. The performance evaluation will assess changes in time to conduct a land transaction, demand for formal land transactions and the mortgage industry. These evaluations are expected in 2016.

Water Sector Project

  • An impact evaluation will be conducted for the Rural Water Supply and Sanitation activity. Performance evaluations will be carried out for the Metolong Dam and Urban/Peri-Urban Water Supply activities. The evaluations will look at changes in household expenditure on water, reductions in water-related health problems and time savings associated with improved water supply. The final reports are expected in 2015.

Morocco

The $697.5 million compact with the Kingdom of Morocco seeks to reduce poverty and stimulate economic growth through investments in five projects. These strategic investments will increase productivity and improve employment in high growth potential sectors such as fruit tree productivity, small-scale fisheries, and artisan crafts. Small business creation and economic growth will also be complemented by investments in financial services and enterprise support.

Morocco
Policy Reforms
  • MCA Morocco signed an agreement with Ministry of National Education and its subsidiary departments to develop a national literacy certification system. The literacy certification system will facilitate mobility between the non-formal/literacy training system and the formal vocational training provided by the artisan, fisheries and agriculture sectors. In the long-term, this should improve job mobility for individuals seeking further training in their field.
  • Morocco's Office National des Peches, in consultation with representatives of mobile fish vendors, who are beneficiaries of the compact's Small-Scale Fisheries Project, has developed mobile fish vendor business codes, stipulating the use of wholesale markets as well as adoption and respect of quality standards. This will ensure that vendors are properly trained in quality assurance and operations and that the quality of fish is preserved throughout the value chain.
  • Previously in Morocco, wholesale fish sellers had monopoly power in these markets, and rights to wholesale fish buying/selling were generally hereditary. After consultations with producers and consumers in the fisheries market, the Moroccan Parliament passed into law new regulations ensuring that markets are more open and competitive. The change to these regulations should incentivize growth in wholesale fish commerce.
  • The Government of Morocco, through the Ministry of Finance and the Central Bank, as part of the compact's Financial Services Project, will take the necessary actions to allow microfinance associations to become deposit-taking institutions. Currently in Morocco, only nonprofit institutions are permitted to provide microloans, and these organizations are not allowed to provide other financial services, such as savings products. The transformation of these institutions will ultimately allow the associations to provide more diverse financial services to compact beneficiaries.
  • The implementation of national sectorial strategies has been reinforced and accelerated, including: the Green Morocco Plan in agriculture; Halieutis in fisheries; the 2015 Vision for the artisan; Moukawalati in the creation and support of very small enterprises; the National Initiative for Human Development (INDH); and the national literacy program. As MCC-supported projects were integrated into national strategies, government ownership of the projects has been notable.
Outputs

Fruit Tree Productivity Project

  • The project converted 60,686 hectares of annual cereal crops into olive and almond trees, which are better suited to local conditions and are more profitable, leading to an increased and stabilized income for 40,000 farmers’ households.
  • Investment in improved irrigation infrastructure led to the rehabilitation of 19,000 hectares of oasis, allowing farmers to increase productivity and practice more value-added crops.
  • More than 23,000 adult farmers and more than 7,600 youth farmers have received training on improved agricultural practices.

Small-scale Fisheries Project

  • Through the Small-scale Fisheries Project, 11,800 fishers are benefiting from fish landing sites equipped with auction halls to allow fishers to better market their catches, ice production plants to preserve the quality of fish.
  • More than 16,500 fishers received training certificates after attending workshops aimed at enhancing fisheries practices.
  • In addition, 623 mobile fish vendors have been equipped with heavy-duty, 3-wheeled motorbikes with insulated ice chests.

Artisan and Fez Medina Project

  • 2,332 artisan potters were trained in improved production techniques that will allow them to improve productivity and cut costs.
  • The Government of Morocco will continue the restoration of 11 historic sites from the 14th and the 15th centuries in the Fez Medina after the end of the compact, which will lead to increased artisan sales and revenues in the tourism sector.
  • A new production zone was constructed at Ain Nokbi, consisting of 77 workshops and 33 other separate workshops, all of which are dedicated to relocating coppersmiths and polluting activities from the area to ensure continued and reinforced artisan production and professional development activities.

Financial Services (Microcredit) Project

  • The subordinated debt of $25 million to Jada, a fund dedicated to financing microfinance institutions (MFIs), maintained access to financing across MFIs in the sector. In parallel, technical assistance was provided to MFIs to develop new financial products and improve their operating efficiency and transparency. The project helped stabilize the number of microfinance beneficiaries at nearly 800,000, in spite of global declines in the sector.

Enterprise Support Project

  • 593 entrepreneurs received a total of 9,100 days of individual training as well as technical assistance for a year and a half.
Preliminary and Expected Outcomes

Fruit Tree Productivity Project

  • MCC’s investment significantly reinforced Government of Morocco investments in rehabilitating small and medium irrigation networks which will lead to improved yields for famers. The project covers 16% of the total irrigated area through small and medium irrigation networks in Morocco, which represents 50% of the areas rehabilitated since the 1960s.

Small-scale Fisheries Project

  • Due to enhanced access to catch preservation equipment and rehabilitated auction halls, the average price of fish fetched by artisan fishermen is rising. From a baseline of 35.2 Dirhams per kilogram, fishers are now garnering 43.2 Dirhams per kilogram in the rehabilitated auction sites ($4.22 to $5.18 at August 2013 conversion).

Artisan and Fez Medina Project

  • Almost 70,000 farmers, artisans and fishers (67% women) are gaining literacy skills and graduates are likely to experience improved job opportunities in their sectors.
  • More than 11,000 farmers, artisans, and fishers (77% women) have graduated from the functional literacy program, developing professional skills while improving employment prospects in their sectors.
  • Over 7,500 Moroccans (42% women) have received certificates of completion for the Competitive Skills Development program.

Financial Services (Microcredit) Project

  • 3,350 clients are utilizing the mobile branches set up by the project.
  • The number of microcredit associations reporting to the credit bureau has almost doubled.
Evaluations

Fruit Tree Productivity Project

  • A combination of impact and performance evaluations will be completed in early 2014. These evaluations focus on examining: changes in quantity, quality and price of fruit tree crops value and processing of olive oil, the role of farmer’s organizations in value chain processing and marketing, and possible spillover adoption of techniques by farmers outside of the treatment perimeters.

Small Scale Fisheries Project

  • Two performance evaluations will be completed in early 2014. In addition to looking at changes in beneficiary income, these evaluations include analysis on whether women were better integrated in the value chain of artisanal fishing.

Artisan and Fez Medina Project

  • Performance evaluations cover all activities within the project. The evaluations are expected to answer questions about improvements in value added of small and medium pottery firms and the incomes of artisans and functional literacy beneficiaries. The evaluations should be completed in 2015.

Financial Services Project

  • A performance evaluation will be completed in early 2014. The evaluation will assess if remote rural areas have better access to microcredit as a result of the project.

Enterprise Support Project

  • An impact evaluation of this randomized pilot program is currently being completed. Results for this impact evaluation are expected to be available in November 2013.

Mongolia

The $285 million compact with the Government of Mongolia strives to increase economic activity through secure and registered land titles in urban areas, sustainable utilization and management of rangelands in peri-urban areas, and improved vocational and technical training. The compact also makes investments to help the Mongolian people become healthier and more productive as they enter the marketplace, to improve urban air quality by increasing the adoption of energy efficient products and homes in the ger districts of Ulaanbaatar and support the development of renewable energy, and to improve the road in the critical north-south economic corridor that stretches from Russia to China through Mongolia.

Mongolia
Policy Reforms
  • The passage of the Vocational Education (TVET) law in 2009 puts in place a new legal/policy and operational framework for a modern TVET system, fostering institutional mechanisms for a more demand-driven and private sector engaged TVET system.
  • The Non-Communicable Disease and Injuries (NCDI) Early Detection training and outreach activities support the expansion of primary medical care and promotion of behavioral changes with the goal of preventing non-communicable diseases. Prevention is critical to reducing the cost burden of treatment and the negative effects on life expectancy. Several key evidenced-based guidelines for cardiovascular disease prevention, detection and treatment have received Ministry of Health approval and have been used in the nation-wide screening program that MCC supported.
  • The urban property rights legal and regulatory reform project seeks to revise numerous laws and regulations to facilitate linkages between the land mapping and property registration systems and simplify the process by which urban ger-area dwellers become land owners. A legal and regulatory commission identified the major issues in 2009, and more detailed analysis, law drafting, and support for legal change have since been carried out.
  • The Government of Mongolia will continue its commitment to the government’s road maintenance fund with a yearly increase in the amount committed to the road fund (compared to the prior fiscal year in real terms) and maintenance needs of existing, improved and newly constructed roads. This will ensure ongoing maintenance for the roads and bridges throughout the country, including those constructed and rehabilitated under the compact’s North-South Road Project.
  • MCA-Mongolia has hosted three annual Hazardous Materials Workshops to share experience and lessons on how to safely handle hazardous wastes created from building renovations, medical procedures, or other operations. Due in part to the exposure MCA-Mongolia has given to this issue, the Government of Mongolia recently banned the use of asbestos in construction materials.
Outputs

Energy and Environment Project (EEP)

  • MCC funded product testing, the establishment of a new distribution channel and limited subsidies to support 121,447 consumer purchases of new energy-efficient products demonstrated to reduce air pollution, resulting in sales of 97,786 solid fuel stoves, as well as insulation, vestibules and 98 energy-efficient homes.
  • Once the MCC-funded substation has been upgraded, it is expected that 112,000,000 kilowatt hours of wind power will be dispatched from the substation to the National Dispatch Center.

Health Project

  • Training in non-communicable disease and injury has been provided to 15,604 health staff (72% female) and 565 school teachers. In addition, 10 out of a targeted 20 health staff have been trained in improved approaches in stroke and cardiac care, such as acute myocardial infraction.
  • After the completion of this project, it is expected that 100% of secondary level hospitals will offer services on the treatment of cervical cancer abnormalities such as Loop electrosurgical excision procedure or colposcopy, rising from a baseline of 12.9% in 2010. Adequate services for the treatment of cervical cancer include trained staff, clinical guidelines, and special equipment.
  • 12 million health education materials have been printed. By the end of the project, it is expected that 95% of primary healthcare facilities will have at least two types of non-communicable disease-related health education materials available.

Property Rights Project

  • 1,586 public officials, traditional authorities, project beneficiaries, and representatives from the private sector (54% female) have received formal, on-the-job land training or technical assistance.
  • Since the implementation of the program, 3,215 disputed land and property rights cases have been successfully mediated.
  • 15 land administration and service offices have been established or upgraded.
  • 1,315 households (at least one person per household) have been trained on sustainable pasture use and improving livestock productivity.
  • MCC piloted and established a new system for rangeland management around cities, provided 15-year land leases to 387 herder groups comprising 1,315 households and installed wells on 311 parcels. Of the 387 leases, 23% were from female headed households.

Vocational Education Project (TVET)

  • An anticipated 40 Information, Communication and Technology and multimedia labs will be installed or upgraded by the end of the project.
  • 1,574 instructors have completed MCC-supported training.
  • 18 schools have received the latest technology in training equipment for priority trades, including heavy machinery operation, lathe milling, electricity, electronics, plumbing, welding, and heating and cooling technology.

North-South Road Project

  • An expected 176 kilometers of road along the North-South Road, stretching from Russia to China, will be reconstructed or rehabilitated.
  • 344 members of the workforce have undergone training on trafficking in persons, health and safety, and HIV/AIDS and STIs.
Preliminary and Expected Outcomes

Energy and Environment Project (EEP)

  • The energy-efficient fuel stoves are expected to reduce Particulate Matter (PM) 2.5 emissions in Ulaanbaatar households by 2,635 tons, or 57 percent during the heating season from October to March.

Health Project

  • With an increased emphasis on the significance of treating and preventing non-communicable diseases (NCDs), the annual national budget allocated for NCDs has risen from $345,000 in 2009 to $1,260,000 in 2013.

Property Rights Project

  • It is estimated that 95,891 individuals will benefit from increased security and capitalization of land assets held by lower-income Mongolians.
  • Herd mortality rate from natural causes and sickness-related deaths is expected to fall for both cattle and sheep.

Vocational Education Project (TVET)

  • 12,609 students (56% female) have enrolled or participated in MCC-supported education schooling programs. Of these, 2,076 students (20% female) have graduated.
  • 880 members of the teaching staff (62% female) have successfully completed the certification exam after receiving project training.

North-South Road Project

  • The improvements made to the North-South Road are expected to decrease the International Roughness Index (IRI) from 11.2 to 2.
  • The total time to drive the length of the North-South Road from Choir to Sainshand/35th RW Crossing is expected to fall from 5 hours to 2.2 hours.
Evaluations

Energy and Environment Project (EEP)

  • An impact evaluation will be conducted to examine the project’s impact on air quality, health and fuel expenditures.

Health Project

  • A performance evaluation is expected to be completed in December 2013. The evaluation will focus on analyzing whether activities affected changes in knowledge and incidence of non-communicable diseases and injuries.

Property Rights Project

  • Impact evaluations will measure the effect the privatization and registration of ger area land has had on land investments, property values, access to credit, and ultimately, household income. In addition, a performance evaluation will assess the changes in demand for land registration and the changes in time to transact a land related registration. These evaluations are being conducted in phases and are expected to be completed between late 2013 and fall 2017.

Vocational Education Project (TVET)

  • An impact evaluation will analyze the effects of attending the TVET schools on vocational education students’ academic achievements and skill levels, post-graduation employment, and salary levels.

Mozambique

The $506.9 million compact seeks to increase productive capacity, income generation, and poverty reduction in Mozambique’s Northern provinces by improving rural and urban water and sanitation, roads, land administration and agriculture. It also addresses key policy reforms and capacity building initiatives. The investment focuses on the economically lagging northern provinces, home to half of the country’s population.

Mozambique
Policy Reforms
  • The Government of Mozambique has prepared a paved road maintenance program that includes a periodic maintenance for the entire paved roads network. The program includes, but is not limited to the following items: a rolling planning period of 8 years; provisions for annual updating of the program based upon additions to the paved road network; a detailed listing of all paved roads subject to periodic maintenance by year; a funding plan that includes 100% of routine and periodic maintenance works.
  • As a compact condition precedent for disbursement, the Minister of Public Works and Housing expanded the mandate of the independent Water Regulatory Commission to have broader oversight over smaller cities and towns in order to better ensure sustainability and regulatory consistency within the sector.
  • MCC partnered with the World Bank to launch the Water Infrastructure Authority, a new institution responsible for managing water supply and sanitation assets in Mozambican cities with a population between 50,000 and 150,000. AIAS now manages water supply and sanitation in all of Mozambique’s medium-sized cities and plays a vital role in addressing the needs of small- and medium-sized municipal water and sanitation systems.
Outputs

Water and Sanitation Project

  • MCC is helping rehabilitate the Nacala Dam and raise it from 17 meters to 19 meters.
  • Rehabilitation and expansion of the Nampula water supply system will provide an additional 20,000 cubic meters of treated water per day, doubling the current capacity.
  • More than 611 community water access points with hand pumps have been constructed in Nampula and Cabo Delgado to improve water access to over 600 communities.
  • 8,484 people in rural communities have been trained in hygiene and sanitary best practices

Rehabilitation/Construction of Roads Project

  • 253 kilometers of road are to be completed in three key north/south segments of the National Route 1 (N1) in Nampula and Cabo Delgado provinces.

Land Tenure Services Project

  • The project formalized 1.4 million rural hectares and 112,568 urban parcels by March 2013. By the end of the compact, the project will have issued formalized land rights (DUATs) to over 150,000 urban and rural landholders in four Northern provinces.

Farmer Income Support Project (FISP)

  • FISP has contributed to controlling the spread of Coconut Lethal Yellowing Disease (CLYD) outbreaks. If allowed to continue at the 2008 rate of spread, the disease would have destroyed an estimated 50% of coconut trees in the eastern coastal belt of the Nampula and Zambzia provinces. As of June 2013, the project had reached the target of clearing 8,000 hectares of diseased or dead palm trees in the endemic zone to prevent the spread of the disease, planted 782,609 coconut seedlings, and trained 28,830 farmers in post-planting management of coconuts to ensure the survival rate of new coconut seedlings.
  • Within the group of farmers trained in post-planting management, almost 9,000 received additional training in alternative crop production. As of June 2013, 7,686 hectares of alternative crops are under production in the CLYD endemic areas.
Preliminary and Expected Outcomes

Water and Sanitation Project

  • Time to get to a non-private water source should decrease by 30% in rural beneficiary communities. This should improve health and sanitation conditions to reduce water-borne diseases like cholera and will provide women, often the primary water gatherers, more time for child care, education and income-generating activities.
  • Residential water consumption in rural communities will increase from 16 to 20 liters per capita per day and in urban areas from 20 to 24 liters per capita per day.

Rehabilitation/Construction of Roads Project

  • It is expected that average annual daily traffic on the two road segments will increase by over 18%.

Land Tenure Services Project

  • 36 partnerships between communities and investors have been established through the Community Land Fund, which is double the target. This includes new community based investments as well as partnerships with commercial entities, both domestic and foreign.
  • The values of rural and urban parcel holdings are expected to increase by 20 and 30 percent from land formalization, respectively.

Farmer Income Support Project

  • Household income from coconuts and coconut products is expected to double
  • Income from intercropping is expected to nearly triple.
  • The proportion of farmers adopting improved techniques in surveillance, pest, and disease control for coconuts has surpassed its target by 10%; with 33% of farmers adopting improved practices.
Evaluations

Water and Sanitation Project

  • Performance evaluations will be conducted for all activities in the project, with results expected in late 2014 and 2016. These two evaluations will assess the project’s impacts in (1) urban water supply and sanitation facilities’ delivery and reliability capacity and (2) health and cost benefits of hand pumps and small scale solar powered water systems in rural communities.

Rehabilitation/Construction of Roads Project

  • HDM-4 Analysis will be conducted on MCC-funded road segments following completion of works. HDM-4 Analysis is a standard method that quantifies road users’ benefits from savings in vehicle operating costs, reduced travel times and decreased accidents. The report will also generate updated Economic Rates of Return (ERRs). It is expected to be completed in May of 2015.

Land Tenure Services Project

  • The land tenure project is being evaluated by a combination of impact and performance evaluations, all of which are expected to be completed in 2016. The evaluations will assess the impacts of the project in terms of changes in time to register a property, use of the formal system and increases in land values and/or investment in land.

Farmer Income Support Project

  • The farmer income support project will be evaluated by performance evaluations, with reports expected starting mid-2014. The evaluations will look at the project’s effects on incomes of coconut farmers in endemic and epidemic areas. Specifically, the evaluations will assess the investment’s achievements in coconut and selected crop productivity, the survival rate of coconut seedlings, and the most effective measures for maintaining a low incidence rate of Coconut Lethal Yellowing Disease. The evaluations will also examine if the project’s investments improve women’s welfare and/or reduce inequality.

Tanzania

The $698 million compact with the United Republic of Tanzania seeks to facilitate poverty reduction through economic growth and raise the quality of life in mainland Tanzania and Zanzibar by strategically investing in transportation, energy, and water infrastructure. Specifically, the compact aims to reduce transportation costs and travel time and increase traffic volume on trunk and rural roads and increase air travel to Mafia island, provide better quality and more reliable power to an increased number of customers, and improve water sources for a growing number of households and businesses.

Tanzania
Policy Reforms
  • Together with other donors, MCC pushed for the creation of an effective new National Road Safety Policy, which was approved by the Cabinet in 2009. The new policy is expected to create a Road Safety Board, with sufficient autonomy and funding to effectively push for greater road safety. The World Bank has agreed to fund additional road safety programs over the next 3-5 years.
  • The compact requires the two power companies (TANESCO for the mainland and ZECO for Zanzibar) to move towards a sustainable tariff structure that will ultimately ensure full cost recovery and sustainability. Significant tariff increases were implemented for both utilities (21.7% followed by an additional 40.29% for TANESCO and 40% for ZECO), but neither has yet achieved full cost recovery tariff rates. Full cost recovery tariffs remain a key agenda item for the U.S. Government under Partnership for Growth and Power Africa, as well as for other donors. In the case of Zanzibar, MCC’s discussions regarding the submarine cable are facilitating a commercial relationship between the mainland and Zanzibar power companies for the first time, and resulted in a signed Power Purchase Agreement (endorsed by the independent regulator) in April 2010. Electricity rates have steadily increased through regulatory action on the mainland and government action on Zanzibar.
  • The compact provided for passage of a new Electricity Act to replace 75-year old prior legislation. The new law provides for more private sector participation in the energy sector, with specific provisions that will enable energy producers to sell power to the former state monopoly producer, TANESCO. Passage of this legislation was an important demonstration of the government’s commitment to a more private sector oriented, and therefore sustainable, energy sector. On Zanzibar, technical assistance was provided to help institute a new electricity and water regulatory authority, which was passed by Parliament and is awaiting Presidential assent.
  • The Government of Tanzania (GOT) has agreed to pursue financial recovery measures for the two water utilities which MCC is supporting in Dar es Salaam and Morogoro, to include the implementation of the independent regulator’s approved tariffs that will fully recover operation and maintenance costs, and demonstrate a sustainable trend to recover asset depreciation. Continued compact-required progress on tariff reform in the water sector is a safeguard that will contribute to institutional sustainability.
Outputs

Transportation Sector Project

  • 65.14 of 468.2 planned kilometers of roads have been completed and taken over in mainland Tanzania. The remaining road segments will be completed by the GOT. 100% of runway surfacing has been completed at the Mafia Island Airport.

Energy Sector Project

  • 1,218 kilometers of 33/11 KV lines and 1,127.6 kilometers of LV lines have been constructed in mainland Tanzania. 77.8 kilometers of 132 KV lines has been constructed in and to Zanzibar.
  • Transmission and distribution capacity has increased in two of the eight substations in mainland Tanzania and remained constant in the other five. In total, capacity has increased from 473.2 MVA to 570.9 MVA.
  • 390 photovoltaic systems were installed in health centers, dispensaries, secondary schools, village markets, and beach management units, bringing a combined capacity of 242 kWp to Kigoma.

Water Sector Project

  • Once the Morogoro water plants have been upgraded, the Mafiga and Mambogo plants are expected to produce 33 million liters of water per day. Prior to project implementation, the plants produced 23 million liters of water per day.
  • Once the GOT completes the Lower Ruvu transmission main upgrade (estimated in 2014), it is expected that the Lower Ruvu treatment plant will provide 270 million liters of water per day to Dar es Salaam, rising from 180 million liters of water per day before the upgrade began.
Preliminary and Expected Outcomes

Transportation Sector Project

  • Based on initial projections, it is expected that the rehabilitation of Tanzania roads on the mainland and in Pemba will approximately double the average annual daily traffic on all road segments.
  • Based on initial projections, the completion of the Mafia Island Airport rehabilitation activity is expected to contribute to an increase in annual aggregate visitor spending on Mafia Island from $3.3 million in 2008 to $4.2 million.

Energy Sector Project

  • 2,392 customers have connected to the energized compact-funded distribution lines across the 7 mainland project regions.

Water Sector Project

  • Based on initial projections, once updates have been made to the water treatment plants in Morogoro and Lower Ruvu and put into effect, it is expected that the average monthly volume of residential water consumption will increase from 98 liters per capita per day in Morogoro and 116 liters per capita per day in Lower Ruvu to 150 liters per capita per day in both regions.
Evaluations

Transportation Sector Project

  • The evaluation of the mainland trunk roads will assess the impact of the improved roads network on travel times and vehicle operating costs. The impact evaluation of the Pemba Rural Roads will assess changes in travel times, the prices of producer and consumer goods, and the well-being of people and villages along the improved roads. In addition, a performance evaluation will investigate whether the Mafia Island Airport upgrades have increased tourism and business travel and, therefore, visitor spending on the island. All evaluations are expected to be completed by December 2016.

Energy Sector Project

  • The impact evaluations of the Mainland Transmission & Distribution Activity and a performance evaluation in Zanzibar are seeking to measure the magnitude of the impact access to electricity has on household income, health, and education in the household setting and the magnitude of the impact on the number of new firms, capital investments, and levels of employment in the business setting. In Kigoma, a performance evaluation will look at any changes in trends the activity has had on the number of customers that have received a solar photovoltaic system and the total duration of power availability a day. All evaluations are expected to be completed by December 2015.

Water Sector Project

  • The impact evaluation will look at the effect the rehabilitation of the Lower Ruvu and Morogoro water treatment plants has had on the water supply, water availability, and impacts in consumption at the household and business levels in Dar es Salaam and Morogoro. In addition, these impact evaluations will measure the effect the plant improvements has had on health, poverty and income, and investment in physical and human capital and see if project benefits accrue differently to men and women. Both evaluations are expected to be completed by December 2016.

Compact and Threshold Program Portfolios

Compact Obligations/Commitments by Year Appropriated as of September 2013 ($ millions)*
Country 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Total
Armenia   176.6               176.6
Benin   301.8               301.8
Burkina Faso         480.9         480.9
Cabo Verde I 108.5                 108.5
Cabo Verde II                 66.2 66.2
El Salvador I     361.8 87.8           449.6
Georgia I 290.2 24.2   17.0 55.8         387.2
Georgia II                 140.0 140.0
Ghana I   536.3               536.3
Honduras 204.0                 204.0
Indonesia   55.0           545.0   600.0
Jordan           55.0 220.1     275.1
Kenya     0.1             0.1
Lesotho       362.6           362.6
Madagascar 85.6                 85.6
Malawi             209.9 140.8   350.7
Mali     435.6             435.6
Moldova 90.7 16.4 8.5 0.9 9.0 86.6 50.0     262.0
Mongolia       284.9           284.9
Morocco   72.0 625.3             697.3
Mozambique       506.9           506.9
Namibia       224.1 80.4         304.5
Nicaragua 112.7                 112.7
Philippines             433.9     433.9
Senegal           540.0       540.0
Tanzania         698.1         698.1
Vanuatu   65.4               65.4
Zambia                 354.8 354.8
Grand Total 891.7 1,247.6 1,431.2 1,484.2 1,324.2 681.6 913.9 685.8 561.0 9,221.2
* Amounts are net of de-obligations, where applicable. Also, amounts may not add due to rounding.

 

Compact Amounts at Signing and Key Dates ($ millions)*
Country Partner Sub-Saharan Africa Europe, Asia and Pacific Middle East & N. Africa Latin America Signing Entry Into Force Closed Dates
Madagascar 109.8       4/18/2005 7/27/2005 8/31/2009
Honduras       215.0 6/13/2005 9/29/2005 9/29/2010
Cabo Verde 110.1       7/4/2005 10/17/2005 10/17/2010
Nicaragua       175.0 7/14/2005 5/26/2006 5/26/2011
Georgia   395.3     9/12/2005 4/7/2006 4/7/2011
Benin 307.3       2/22/2006 10/6/2006 10/6/2011
Vanuatu   65.7     3/2/2006 4/28/2006 4/28/2011
Armenia   235.7     3/27/2006 9/29/2006 9/29/2011
Ghana 547.0       8/1/2006 2/16/2007 2/16/2012
Mali 460.8       11/13/2006 9/17/2007 8/24/2012
El Salvador       460.9 11/29/2006 9/20/2007 9/20/2012
Mozambique 506.9       7/13/2007 9/22/2008 9/22/2013
Lesotho 362.6       7/23/2007 9/17/2008 9/17/2013
Morocco      697.5   8/31/2007 9/15/2008 9/15/2013
Mongolia   284.9     10/22/2007 9/17/2008 9/17/2013
Tanzania 698.1       2/17/2008 9/17/2008 9/17/2013
Burkina Faso 480.9       7/14/2008 7/31/2009  
Namibia 304.5       7/28/2008 9/16/2009  
Senegal 540.0       9/16/2009 9/23/2010  
Moldova   262.0     1/22/2010 9/1/2010  
Philippines   433.9     9/23/2010 05/25/11  
Jordan     275.1   10/25/2010 12/13/11  
Malawi 350.7       4/7/2011 9/20/2013  
Indonesia   600.0     11/19/2011 4/2/2013  
Cabo Verde 66.2       2/10/2012 11/30/2012  
Zambia 354.8       5/10/2012 11/15/2013  
Georgia   140.0     6/26/2013    
* Please note that the values above are the signed compact amounts and do not reflect lower actual expenditures due to early terminations or funds for a compact not being fully spent.The table on the prior page reflects the net obligations/commitments associated with each compact.

 

Threshold Program Amounts at Signing ($ millions)
 Country Sub-Saharan Africa  Eurasia  Latin America  Middle East & N. Africa Signing Date Completion Date
Burkina Faso 12.9       7/22/2005 9/30/2008
Malawi 20.9       9/23/2005 9/30/2008
Albania   13.9     4/3/2006 11/15/2008
Tanzania 11.2       5/3/2006 12/30/2008
Paraguay     34.6   5/8/2006 8/31/2009
Zambia 22.7       5/22/2006 2/28/2009
Philippines   20.7     7/26/2006 5/29/2009
Jordan       25.0 10/17/2006 8/29/2009
Indonesia   55.0     11/17/2006 12/31/2010
Ukraine   45.0     12/4/2006 12/31/2009
Moldova   24.7     12/14/2006 2/28/2010
Kenya 12.7       3/23/2007 12/31/2010
Uganda 10.4       3/29/2007 12/31/2009
Guyana     6.7   8/23/2007 2/23/2010
Sao Tome & Principe 8.7       11/9/2007 4/15/2011
Kyrgyz Republic   16.0     3/14/2008 6/30/2010
Niger* 23.1       3/17/2008 In progress
Peru     35.6   6/9/2008 9/30/2012
Rwanda 24.7       9/24/2008 12/31/2011
Albania   15.7     9/29/2008 7/31/2011
Paraguay     30.3   4/13/2009 7/31/2012
Liberia 15.1       7/6/2010 12/1/2013
Timor-Leste   10.5     9/22/2010 In progress
Honduras     15.6   8/29/2013 In progress
* MCC had a $23 million threshold program with Niger prior to suspension; however, only $17 million was spent prior to suspension and now $2 million has been allocated to complete the program.

Compact Modifications

MCC employs a risk-based approach to the management of its foreign assistance portfolio and uses a number of mechanisms for managing projects that face potential major modifications, including:

  • Quarterly portfolio reviews of all compacts, with a focus on high-risk projects and activities;
  • Early identification of high-risk projects;
  • Close collaboration with partner countries to develop plans to prevent, mitigate and manage project restructuring; and
  • Approval of modifications at the appropriate level.

MCC has also refined its compact development process to ensure that adequate due diligence is conducted on programs in advance of compact signing to increase the reliability of technical, cost and other estimates. During compact development MCC also makes project design modifications to mitigate potential completion risk, currency fluctuations and the potential for construction cost overruns.

Summary of Restructurings and Reallocations in FY 2013
Country Project/Activity Cause Action Implemented
Burkina Faso Roads Projects

As reported in the last Semiannual Report to Congress, $14.1 million was reallocated from the Rural Roads Activity to the Primary Roads Activity, as bids for the Primary Roads Activity exceeded the amount budgeted.

Subsequently, improvements in cost management and revised contingency provisions for the Primary Roads Activity freed up budget to allow reconsideration of Lot 1 of the Rural Roads Activity.

MCC approved a total reallocation of $3.3 million to proceed with construction of one lot of the Rural Roads Activity.
Lesotho Health Project In June 2013, MCA reallocated a total of $22,315,421 among the Water, Health, PSD and Program Management and Oversight Projects. The majority of these funds, $21,854,726, were reallocated to the Health Center Activity for reimbursement to the Government of Lesotho (GOL) against the its significant counterpart contribution. The GOL committed over $150 million and disbursed over $60 million as of June 2013 to avoid project de-scoping, to cover the cost of project completion post-compact, and to ensure sustainability of MCC investments. MCA planned to use the money to complete all outstanding compact activities after the compact was complete.
Moldova High Value Agriculture Project The Road Rehabilitation Project (RRP) yielded a $19 million surplus from the planned compact budget, prompting the Government of Moldova to request a reallocation of said $19 million to expand existing projects and cover potential funding shortfalls in the Transition to High Value Agriculture. MCC approved a reallocation of $19 million to expand existing projects and cover potential funding shortfalls in the Transition to High Value Agriculture Project.
Malawi Compact level The estimated cost of compact activities increased due to inflation resulting from delays caused by the compact's operational hold and suspension. In addition, the Government of Malawi also requested several new infrastructure sub-projects. The Malawi Compact was re-scoped in July 2013; while several activities were affected by reallocations, the overall compact amount remained the same. Reallocations included the replacement of a planned 220 kV transmission line with a 400 kV line, removal of a planned substation, and reduction in investments in remote data collection technology (SCADA). In the same amendment, MCC revised the compact structure to improve fiscal control and results monitoring and reporting by elevating two compact activities and one sub-activity to the project level. Finally, the economic model for the compact was updated.
Mozambique Water Supply & Sanitation (WSS) Variation orders required on works under the WSS Projects Urban Water Supply Activity led to a cost increase of this component to the WSS Project. MCC approved the reallocation of $15.5 million from the Urban Drainage Activity of the same WSS Project in August 2013.

Detailed Program Results Information

Estimating Compact Beneficiaries and Benefits

Under MCC's results framework, beneficiaries are defined as an individual and all members of his or her household who will experience an income gain as a result of MCC interventions. MCC considers that the entire household will benefit from the income gain and counts are multiplied by the average household size in the area or country. The beneficiary standard makes a distinction between individuals participating in a project and individuals expected to increase their income as a result of the project. Before signing a compact, MCC estimates the expected long-term income gains through a rigorous benefit-cost analysis. MCC may modify its estimates and/or the present value (PV) of benefits when project designs change during implementation.

Projected Beneficiaries and Income Benefits by Compact 1 2
Compact Estimated Number of Beneficiaries Estimated Long Term Income Gain Over the Life of the Project
(PV of Benefits) 3
Benefit/Cost Ratio 4
Armenia 426,000 $295,500,000 1.7
Benin 14,059,000 $409,600,000 1.8
Burkina Faso 1,181,000 $151,000,000 0.4
Cabo Verde I 385,000 $149,500,000 1.8
Cabo Verde II 604,000 $148,200,000 1.6
El Salvador 706,000 $366,700,000 1.0
Georgia 143,000 $301,300,000 1.0
Ghana 1,217,000 $690,300,000 1.7
Honduras 1,705,000 $237,300,000 1.5
Indonesia 2,900,000 $136,600,000 1.5
Jordan 3,657,000 $800,300,000 4.1
Lesotho 1,041,000 $376,000,000 1.5
Madagascar 480,000 $123,200,000 1.7
Malawi 983,000 $567,200,000 2.4
Mali 2,837,000 $393,600,000 1.2
Moldova 414,000 $259,900,000 1.5
Mongolia 2,058,000 $314,800,000 1.7
Morocco 1,695,000 $805,400,000 1.6
Mozambique 3,325,000 $542,300,000 1.5
Namibia 1,063,000 $240,500,000 1.1
Nicaragua 119,000 $83,500,000 1.0
Philippines 125,822,000 $483,300,000 1.6
Senegal 1,660,000 $625,000,000 1.6
Tanzania 5,425,000 $1,335,800,000 2.6
Vanuatu 39,000 $73,800,000 1.4
Total 5 173,945,000 $9,910,600,000 1.6

Sector Results Agriculture, Education, Land, Roads and Water

Agriculture and Irrigation Common Indicators
  Process Indicators Output Indicators Outcome Indicators
Country (AI-1) Value of signed irrigation feasibility and design contracts (USD) (AI-2) Percent disbursed of irrigation feasibility and design contracts (AI-3) Value of signed irrigation construction contracts (USD) (AI-4) Percent disbursed of irrigation construction contracts (AI-5) Temporary employment generated in irrigation (AI-6) Farmers trained (AI-7) Enterprises assisted (AI-8) Hectares under improved irrigation (AI-9) Loan borrowers (AI-10) Value of agricultural and rural loans (USD) (AI-11) Farmers who have applied improved practices as a result of training (AI-12) Hectares under improved practices as a result of training (AI-13) Enterprises that have applied improved techniques
MCC Total 64,583,680 87.0% 599,728,416 71.2% 2,389 247,683 4,008 139,378 1,155 94,324,814 120,569 36,299 1,011
Armenia 4,601,073 100.0% 106,653,443 100.0% 2,389 45,639 227   1,008 13,133,200 26,424   178
El Salvador           15,363 272   29 10,820,274 11,520   163
Georgia 1,155,881 53.4%         291     19,880,003      
Honduras           7,265 464 400 17,100,000 6,996    
Moldova 4,428,303 84.5% 8,301,033 15.0%   3,334 177   22 4,433,575 842   20
Nicaragua 700,000 100.0% - -   9,104         9,104  
Madagascar           31,366 324     1,100,000 1,892   1
Mozambique           28,830 160            
Namibia           7,787            
Burkina Faso 11,311,418 81.4% 57,141,012 59.8%   6,924 255 625 96 10,000,000 3,824    
Cabo Verde I     5,167,848 97.6%   553 13 617,000 106    
Ghana 5,202,887 100.0% 13,009,963 100.0%   66,930 1,724 514 16,740,762 59,060 535
Mali 9,077,220 98.2% 148,951,503 98.3%   1,308 97,503 500,000 801    
Morocco 18,949,079 100.0% 108,017,501 92.0%   23,280 114 19,393 - - - 36,299 114
Senegal 9,157,819 46.5% 152,486,112 13.9%       20,929.48          
Gender*                          
Female           36,773 69   111 157,970 9,342   3
Male           71,104 268   1,015 4,275,605 21,748   17

All program data are as of September 10, 2013. Data are preliminary and subject to adjustment. All financial data is of June 2013.

*Gender totals may not match overall totals due to lack of gender counting in earlier compacts.

  • (AI-1) Value of signed irrigation feasibility and design contracts: The value of all signed feasibility, design, and environmental contracts, including resettlement action plans, for agricultural irrigation investments using 609(g) and compact funds.
  • (AI-2) Percent disbursed of irrigation feasibility and design contracts: The total amount of all signed feasibility, design, and environmental contracts, including resettlement action plans, for agricultural irrigation investments disbursed divided by the total value of all signed contracts.
  • (AI-3) Value of signed irrigation construction contracts: The value of all signed construction contracts for agricultural irrigation investments using compact funds.
  • (AI-4) Percent disbursed of irrigation construction contracts: The total amount of all signed construction contracts for agricultural irrigation investments disbursed divided by the total value of all signed contracts.
  • (AI-5) Temporary employment generated in irrigation: The number of people temporarily employed or contracted by MCA-contracted construction companies to work on construction of irrigation systems.
  • (AI-6) Farmers trained: The number of primary sector producers (farmers, ranchers, fishermen, and other primary sector producers) receiving technical assistance or participating in a training session (on improved production techniques and technologies, including post-harvest interventions, developing business, financial, or marketing planning, accessing credit or finance, or accessing input and output markets).
  • (AI-7) Enterprises assisted: The number of enterprises; producer, processing, and marketing organizations; water users, trade, and business associations; and community-based organizations receiving assistance.
  • (AI-8) Hectares under improved irrigation: The number of hectares served by existing or new irrigation infrastructure that are either rehabilitated or constructed with MCC funding.
  • (AI-9) Loan borrowers: The number of borrowers (primary sector producers, rural entrepreneurs, and associations) who access loans for on-farm, off-farm, and rural investment through MCC financial assistance.
  • (AI-10) Value of agricultural and rural loans: The value of agricultural loans and rural loans disbursed for on-farm, off-farm, and rural investments.
  • (AI-11) Farmers who have applied improved practices as a result of training: The number of primary sector producers (farmers, ranchers, fishermen, and other primary sector producers) that are applying new production or managerial techniques introduced or supported by MCC training or technical assistance, such as input use, production techniques, irrigation practices, post- harvest treatment, farm management techniques, or marketing strategies.
  • (AI-12) Hectares under improved practices as a result of training: The number of hectares on which farmers are applying new production or managerial techniques introduced or supported by MCC, such as input use, production techniques, irrigation practices, post-harvest treatment, farm management techniques, or marketing strategies.
  • (AI-13) Enterprises that have applied improved techniques: The number of rural enterprises; producer, processing, and marketing organizations; water users associations; trade and business associations; and community-based organizations that are applying managerial or processing techniques introduced or supported by MCC.
Education Common Indicators
  Process Indicators Output Indicators Outcome Indicators
Country (E-1) Value of signed educational facility construction, rehabilitation, and equipping contracts (USD) (E-2) Percent disbursed of educational facility construction, rehabilitation, and equipping contracts (E-3) Legal, financial, and policy reforms adopted (E-4) Educational facilities constructed or rehabilitated (E-5) Instructors trained (E-6) Students participating in MCC-supported education activities (E-7) Graduates from MCC-supported education activities (E-8) Employed graduates of MCC-supported education activities
MCC Total 174,316,667 84.3% 5 845 2,790 211,127 24,305 176
El Salvador 10,217,104 99.8% 22 377 30,632 4,285
Mongolia 28,179,328 97.6% 5 18       176
Namibia 89,980,756 70.5%   29   1,049 130  
Burkina Faso 22,758,211 99.9%   396 557 35,909 4,035  
Ghana 18,689,747 100.0%   250 41,019  
Morocco 4,491,521 100.0%   130 1,856 102,518 15,855  
Gender*                
Female         1,388 72,394 11,206 98
Male         1,025 58,383 4,649 78

All program data as September 10, 2013. Data are preliminary and subject to adjustment. Indicators in this Results Framework may be added, removed, or modified as MCC’s investments in education evolve over time. All MCC education programs have as their long-term end goal an increase in individual or household income and a corresponding decrease in poverty. All financial information is of June 2013.

*Gender totals may not match overall totals due to lack of gender counting in earlier compacts.

  • (E-1) Value of signed educational facility construction, rehabilitation, and equipping contracts: The value of all signed construction contracts for educational facility construction, rehabilitation, or equipping (e.g. information technology, desks and chairs, electricity and lighting, water systems, latrines) using compact funds.
  • (E-2) Percent disbursed of educational facility construction, rehabilitation, and equipping contracts: The total amount of all signed construction contracts for education facility works or equipping divided by the total value of all signed contracts.
  • (E-3) Legal, financial, and policy reforms adopted: The number of reforms adopted by the public sector attributable to compact support that increase the education sector's capacity to improve access, quality, and/or relevance of education at any level, from primary to post-secondary.
  • (E-4) Educational facilities constructed or rehabilitated: The number of educational facilities constructed or rehabilitated according to standards stipulated in MCA contracts signed with implementers.
  • (E-5) Instructors trained: The number of classroom instructors who complete MCC-supported training focused on instructional quality as defined by the compact training activity.
  • (E-6) Students participating in MCC-supported education activities: The number of students enrolled or participating in MCC-supported educational schooling programs.
  • (E-7) Graduates from MCC-supported education activities: The number of students graduating from the highest grade (year) for that educational level in MCC-supported education schooling programs.
  • (E-8) Employed graduates of MCC-supported education activities: The number of MCC-supported training program graduates employed in their field of study within one year after graduation.

 

Land Common Indicators
  Output Indicators Outcome Indicators
Country (L-1) Legal and regulatory reforms adopted (L-2) Land administration offices established or upgraded (L-3) Stakeholders trained (L-4) Conflicts successfully mediated (L-5) Parcels corrected or incorporated in land system (L-6) Land rights formalized (L-7) Percentage change in time for property transactions (L-8) Percentage change in cost for property transactions
MCC Total 79 169 27,022 12,374 220,883 187,003    
Mongolia 6 15 1,586 10,639 18,336 19,651    
Nicaragua 8 1,610        
Lesotho 10 1 563 155 44,697 13,081 -93  
Madagascar 4 115 12,216        
Mozambique   26 1,516   151,689 151,689    
Namibia     1,549   6,160 2,581    
Benin 1   50        
Burkina Faso 54   6,151 1,580 1 1    
Cabo Verde II                
Ghana 4 3 427          
Mali 1 1,354          
Senegal                
Gender*                
Male     8,774     79,237    
Female     2,028     53,963    
Joint           18,489    
Location                
Urban         142,285 142,285    
Rural         9,404 9,404    

All program data are as of September 10, 2013. Data are preliminary and subject to adjustment. All financial data is of June 2013.

*Gender totals may not match overall totals due to lack of gender counting in earlier compacts.

  • (L-1) Legal and regulatory reforms adopted: The number of specific pieces of legislation or implementing regulations adopted by the compact country and attributable to compact support.
  • (L-2) Land administration offices established or upgraded: The number of land administration and service offices or other related facilities that the project physically establishes or upgrades.
  • (L-3) Stakeholders trained: The number of public officials, traditional authorities, project beneficiaries and representatives of the private sector, receiving formal on-the-job land training or technical assistance regarding registration, surveying, conflict resolution, land allocation, land use planning, land legislation, land management or new technologies.
  • (L-4) Conflicts successfully mediated: The number of disputed land and property rights cases that have been resolved by local authorities, contractors, mediators or courts with compact support.
  • (L-5) Parcels corrected or incorporated in land system: The number of parcels with relevant parcel information corrected or newly incorporated into an official land information system (whether a system for the property registry, cadastre or an integrated system).
  • (L-6) Land rights formalized: The number of household, commercial and other legal entities (e.g., NGOs, churches, hospitals) receiving formal recognition of ownership and/or use rights through certificates, titles, leases, or other recorded documentation by government institutions or traditional authorities at national or local levels.
  • (L-7) Percentage change in time for property transactions: The average percentage change in number of days for an individual or company to conduct a property transaction within the formal system.
  • (L-8) Percentage change in cost for property transactions: The average percentage change in US Dollars of out of pocket cost for an individual or company to conduct a property transaction within the formal system.

 

Roads Common Indicators
  Process Indicators Output Indicators Outcome Indicators
Country (R-1) Value of signed road feasibility and design contracts (R-2) Percent disbursed of road feasibility and design contracts (R-3) Kilometers of roads under design (R-4) Value of signed road construction contracts (R-5) Percent disbursed of road construction contracts (R-6) Kilometers of roads under works contracts (R-7) Temporary employment generated in road construction (R-8) Kilometers of roads completed (R-9) Roughness (R-10) Average annual daily traffic (R-11) Road traffic fatalities
MCC Total 142,024,053 85.5% 4,649 2,347,913,411 66.1% 3,939 6,898 2,106      
Armenia           24.4   24.4 3.47 735  
El Salvador 17,854,906 97% 223 230,436,425 96% 223.0   223.32      
Georgia 11,980,000 99% 220.2 197,299,030 100% 220.2   217.90 1.50 1,092  
Honduras 9,500,000 75% 672 184,500,000 70% 671.8   610.10      
Moldova     93 92,741,648 24% 93.0 669      
Mongolia 6,083,650 89% 19.3 65,762,513 70% 176.4   176.40 1.90    
Nicaragua 6,900,000 100% 375.5 56,507,526 100% 74.0   74.0      
Philippines 15,023,359 94% 222 193,482,524 8% 222.0          
Vanuatu 5,300,000 100% 150 54,700,000 97% 149.7   149.70 3.00 368  
Mozambique 17,448,527 75% 253 133,066,045 72% 253.0 2,308      
Tanzania 20,943,331 102% 473 410,281,613 85% 468.34 3,921 65.14      
Burkina Faso 8,339,651 65% 536 140,205,145 35% 420.4          
Cabo Verde I 3,520,000 92% 63 24,280,000 100% 40.6   40.60 2.00    
Ghana 4,547,635 100% 943 250,604,022 100% 446.4   445.18      
Mali 9,077,220 44% 0 42,918,038 35% 81.0   79.00      
Senegal 5,505,775 33% 406 271,128,882 10% 375.0          
Gender*                      
Male             6264        
Female             634        
Road Type                      
Primary 72,534,239   2,044 1,537,919,038   1837.9   552.60      
Secondary 24,523,359   894 377,982,524   894   610.00      
Tertiary 10,918,820   902 142,014,736   643   460.84      

All program data are as of September 10, 2013. Data are preliminary and subject to adjustment. All financial data is of June 2013.

*Gender totals may not match overall totals due to lack of gender counting in earlier compacts.

  • (R-1) Value of signed road feasibility and design contracts: The value of all signed feasibility, design, and environmental contracts, including resettlement action plans, for road investments using 609(g) and compact funds.
  • (R-2.1) Value disbursed of road feasibility and design contracts: The value disbursed of all signed feasibility, design, and environmental contracts, including resettlement action plans, for road investments using 609(g) and compact funds.
  • (R-2) Percent disbursed of road feasibility and design contracts: The total amount of all signed feasibility, design, and environmental contracts, including resettlement action plans, for road investments disbursed divided by the total value of all signed contracts.
  • (R-3) Kilometers of roads under design: The length of roads in kilometers under design contracts. This includes designs for building new roads and reconstructing, rehabilitating, resurfacing or upgrading existing roads.
  • (R-4) Value of signed road construction contracts: The value of all signed construction contracts for new roads or reconstruction, rehabilitation, resurfacing or upgrading of existing roads using compact funds.
  • (R-5.1) Value disbursed of roads construction contracts: The value disbursed of all signed construction contracts for new roads or reconstruction, rehabilitation, resurfacing or upgrading of existing roads.
  • (R-5) Percent disbursed of road construction contracts: The total amount of all signed construction contracts for new roads or reconstruction, rehabilitation, resurfacing or upgrading of existing roads disbursed divided by the total value of all signed contracts.
  • (R-6) Kilometers of roads under works contracts: The length of roads in kilometers under works contracts for construction of new roads or reconstruction, rehabilitation, resurfacing or upgrading of existing roads.
  • (R-7) Temporary employment generated in road construction: The number of people temporarily employed or contracted by MCA-contracted construction companies to work on construction of new roads or reconstruction, rehabilitation, resurfacing or upgrading of existing roads.
  • (R-8) Kilometers of roads completed: The length of roads in kilometers on which construction of new roads or reconstruction, rehabilitation, resurfacing or upgrading of existing roads is complete (certificates handed over and approved).
  • (R-9) Roughness: The measure of the roughness of the road surface, in meters of height per kilometer of distance traveled.
  • (R-10) Average annual daily traffic: The average number and type of vehicles per day, averaged over different times (day and night) and over different seasons to arrive at an annualized daily average.
  • (R-11) Road traffic fatalities: The number of road traffic fatalities per year on roads constructed, rehabilitated or improved with MCC funding.

 

Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene Common Indicators
  Process Indicators Output Indicators
Country (WS-1) Value of signed water and sanitation feasibility and design contracts (USD) (WS-2) Percent disbursed of water and sanitation feasibility and design contracts (WS-3) Value of signed water and sanitation construction contracts (USD) (WS-4) Percent disbursed of water and sanitation construction contracts (WS-5) Temporary employment generated in water and sanitation construction (WS-6) People trained in hygiene and sanitary best practices (WS-7) Water points constructed
MCC Total 48,172,136 118.5% 504,464,008 61.0% 11,301 11,754 1,138
El Salvador 6,484,687 95.9% 10,489,711 96.0%   2,406  
Georgia 266,865 100.0% 54,315,000 94.2%      
Jordan     162,909,719 25.4% 347    
Lesotho 4,464,586 298.9% 46,583,053 68% 8,263 170 132
Mozambique 28,619,570 100.9% 170,813,263 72.3% 2,276 8,400 614
Tanzania 6,861,280 100.5% 45,403,796 78.9% 415    
Ghana 1,475,148 100.0% 13,949,465 100.0% - 778 392
Cabo Verde II 1,701,667 0.8%          
Gender*              
Female         200 5,473  
Male         2,076 5,333  

All program data are as of September 10, 2013. Data are preliminary and subject to adjustment. All financial data is of June 2013.

*Gender totals may not match overall totals due to lack of gender counting in earlier compacts.

  • (WS-1) Value of signed water and sanitation feasibility and design contracts: The value of all signed feasibility, design, and environmental contracts, including resettlement action plans, for water and sanitation investments using 609(g) and compact funds.
  • (WS-2) Percent disbursed of water and sanitation feasibility and design contracts: The total amount of all signed feasibility, design, and environmental contracts, including resettlement action plans, for water and sanitation investments disbursed divided by the total value of all signed contracts.
  • (WS-3) Value of signed water and sanitation construction contracts: The value of all signed construction contracts for reconstruction, rehabilitation, or upgrading of water and sanitation works using compact funds.
  • (WS-4) Percent disbursed of water and sanitation construction contracts: The total amount of all signed construction contracts for construction, reconstruction, rehabilitation, or upgrading of water and sanitation works disbursed divided by the total value of all signed contracts.
  • (WS-5) Temporary employment generated in water and sanitation construction: The number of people temporarily employed or contracted by MCA-contracted construction companies to work on construction of water or sanitation systems.
  • (WS-6) People trained in hygiene and sanitary best practices: The number of people who have completed training on hygiene and sanitary practices that block the fecal-oral transmission route.
  • (WS-7) Water points constructed: The number of non-networked, stand-alone water supply systems constructed, such as: protected dug wells, tube-wells / boreholes, protected natural springs and rainwater harvesting / catchment systems.
  • (WS-8) Non revenue water: The difference between water supplied and water sold (i.e. volume of water “lost”) expressed as a percentage of water supplied.
  • (WS-9) Continuity of service: Average hours of service per day for water supply.
  • (WS-10) Operating cost coverage: Total annual operational revenues divided by total annual operating costs.
  • (WS-11) Volume of water produced: Total volume of water produced in cubic meters per day for the service area, i.e. leaving treatment works operated by the utility and purchased treated water, if any.
  • (WS-12) Access to improved water supply: The percentage of households in the MCC project area whose main source of drinking water is a private piped connection (into dwelling or yard), public tap/standpipe, tube-well, protected dug well, protected spring or rainwater.
  • (WS-13) Access to improved sanitation: The percentage of households in the MCC project area who get access to and use an improved sanitation facility such as flush toilet to a piped sewer system, flush toilet to a septic tank, flush or pour flush toilet to a pit, composting toilet, ventilated improved pit latrine or pit latrine with slab and cover.
  • (WS-14) Residential water consumption: The average water consumption in liters per person per day.
  • (WS-15) Industrial/Commercial water consumption: The average amount of commercial water consumed measured in cubic meters per month.
  • (WS-16) Incidence of diarrhea: The percentage of individuals reported as having diarrhea in the two weeks preceding the survey.

 

Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene Common Indicators: (cont.)
Outcome Indicators
Country (WS-8) Non revenue water (WS-9) Continuity of service (WS-10) Operating cost coverage (WS-11) Volume of water produced** Residential population connected to sewer system** Residential population** (WS-12) Access to improved water supply (WS-13) Access to improved sanitation (WS-14) Residential water consumption** (WS-15) Industrial/Commercial water consumption** (WS-16) Incidence of diarrhea**
MCC Total       196,325,000         190 1,001,430 8.0%
El Salvador             83% 88%      
Georgia                      
Jordan 53.8%   85%         72%      
Lesotho 30.0%                    
Mozambique                      
Tanzania 37.7%   114% 196,325,000         172 1,000,746  
Ghana     3%           18 684 8.0%
Cabo Verde II                 16 19,004  
** This is a monitoring indicator; any change over baseline data represents the current trend and does not represent the direct impact of the MCCinvestment.
Footnotes
  • 1. The table includes estimates for compacts that have entered into force and have ERRs from which income benefit calculations can be drawn. Information for Zambia is not yet available, and information for Indonesia is only available for one of the projects at this time.
  • 2. These estimates do not include the projected beneficiaries of projects or activities that have been terminated or suspended by MCC (Madagascar, Honduras, Nicaragua, Mali, and Armenia). In the case of Madagascar, the estimates account for the compact's early termination.
  • 3. The Present Value (PV) of Benefits is the sum of all projected benefits accruing over the life of the project, typically 20 years, evaluated at a 10% discount rate. Estimates are reported in millions of USD in the year that the ERR analysis was completed. Because the PV of benefits uses a discount rate, these figures cannot be compared directly to the undiscounted financial costs of MCC compacts, but must be compared to the PV of costs instead.
  • 4. The benefit/cost ratio is calculated by dividing the PV of benefits by the PV of costs. The PV of costs is the sum of all projected compact costs evaluated at a 10% discount rate.
  • 5. Column totals may not equal the sum of the individual rows due to rounding.