Press Release

For Immediate Release

June 9, 2008

Contact: 202-521-3850

Email: info@mcc.gov

Millennium Challenge Corporation Holds Private Sector Dialogue Sessions to Explore Collaborative Trade and Investment Opportunities

Washington, D.C.  On June 4-6, the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) hosted dialogue sessions between the private sector and the teams developing MCC compact programs for Jordan, Malawi,  Moldova, and Senegal.  In total, the dialogue sessions attracted over one hundred fifty international investors from various sectors, particularly agriculture, infrastructure, and finance.

The dialogue sessions aimed to highlight constraints and opportunities for economic growth, private sector trade and investment opportunities, creative compact structures, and potential corporate social responsibility collaboration. Consultation with civil society and the domestic private sector has been a regular part of MCC compact program development and early dialogue with the international private sector enhances these consultations. Overall, the dialogues were an opportunity for MCCs partner countries to think strategically about how to use compact programs to stimulate private sector interest in collaborative and parallel investments.

MCC will continue to integrate private sector dialogue throughout the compact development and implementation process. Future dialogue sessions will involve other compact-eligible countries and focus on sectors of particular interest. Procurement and collaborative investment opportunities that arise during compact programs will also be highlighted in the coming months.

MCC recognizes private sector participation as critical for success and sustainability of its compact programs. These private sector dialogues are one way to engage the private sector as the engine of economic growth.

For more information on MCCs private sector initiatives, please visit http://www.mcc.gov/programs/privatesector/index.php.

###

MCC, a U.S. government corporation designed to work with developing countries, is based on the principle that aid is most effective when it reinforces sound political, economic, and social policies that promote poverty reduction through economic growth.