Compact Implementation Guidance

Guidance on the Indicator Tracking Table

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List of Acronyms

AADT Average Annual Daily Traffic
AE Accountable Entity
ASR Annual Summary Report
CI Common Indicator
CT Country Team
CED Compact End Date
DCO Department of Compact Operations
DPE Department of Policy and Evaluation
DQ Data quality
EA Economic Analysis
EIF Entry into Force
ESP Environmental and Social Performance
GSI Gender and Social Inclusion
HACR Historical Actual Change Request
IATI International Aid Transparency Initiative
IEPS Infrastructure, Environmental, and Private Sector
ITT Indicator Tracking Table
KPI Key Performance Indicator
kV Kilovolt
M&E Monitoring and Evaluation
MCC Millennium Challenge Corporation
MCC MIS MCC Management Information System
MD Managing Director
PC Post Compact
PV Photovoltaic
PLSD Practice Lead Senior Director
POC Point of Contact
QDRP Quarterly Disbursement Request Package
RCD Resident Country Director
RRA Results Reporting Analyst
TBD To be Determined
US United States

MCC Monitoring and the Indicator Tracking Table

What is the ITT?

MCC’s Policy for Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) defines monitoring as: A continuous function that uses the systematic collection of data on specified indicators to gauge progress toward final program objectives and achievement of intermediate results along the way. 1

The Indicator Tracking Table (ITT) is a quarterly reporting tool that serves as the primary mechanism to operationalize a compact or threshold program’s 2  commitment to monitoring. The ITT tracks the progress of indicators included in the program’s M&E Plan towards program targets and is submitted as part of the Quarterly Disbursement Request Package (QDRP) for compact and threshold funds. 3  Data reported in the ITT are used to inform project implementation decisions, and for internal and external reporting.

The ITT is derived from a program’s M&E Plan, which provides a detailed framework for monitoring and evaluating the program. All MCC programs must have an M&E Plan approved by MCC and the Accountable Entity (AE) Board. As part of this framework, the M&E Plan must include a summary of the program’s monitoring strategy, 4  including detailed indicator information for monitoring indicators, such as definitions, units, classifications, anticipated reporting timelines, baselines, and targets.

Monitoring indicators are mapped to the program logic to provide timely, high quality data about whether the program is proceeding as planned during program implementation. Indicator data (i.e., reported values) should generally be reported on at least an annual basis (with the exception of date indicators, which are reported on once per program) and should be easily understandable by the public. Monitoring data can be taken from a multitude of sources, including administrative data and consultants’ reports. They generally are not based on sampling or provided by a program’s independent evaluators. 5  Based on these criteria, the majority of monitoring indicators are process or output level indicators; however, relevant outcome indicators, particularly those already tracked by partner institutions, ought to be included when possible.

All monitoring indicators, as well as their detailed information must be documented in Annexes I and II of the M&E Plan 6  and the ITT is created based on the information provided in these annexes. All indicator information taken from the M&E Plan must match the M&E Plan exactly and any changes to the indicator information in the ITT must first be made in the M&E Plan as part of a formal revision. Therefore, care must be taken when developing Annex I and II of the M&E Plan to ensure the indicators are clear, well-suited to the program, and conform with MCC’s M&E Policy. Additionally, the M&E Plan should be reviewed regularly to consider changes in program implementation and revised if and when appropriate and allowed by the M&E Policy. After each M&E Plan revision, the ITT is updated by MCC M&E to match the revised M&E Plan.

This guidance describes the roles of both MCC and a compact or threshold program’s AE in completing the ITT each quarter and sets forth standards to ensure consistent reporting across MCC partner countries. Section II provides an introduction to the ITT, including describing its standard and non-standard formats, the ITT submission cycle, and the role of the ITT in MCC reporting.

The remainder of this document expands on the information provided in Section II and is intended for those within MCC and AEs who work closely with the ITT. Section III provides detailed information on how to populate all required columns in the ITT grid. Section IV and Section V define the roles and responsibilities of both MCC and AEs in completing the ITT each quarter. Section VI presents the standard reports generated from ITT data. Section VII and Section VIII provide detailed guidance on two non-standard ITTs: the Closeout ITT and the Post Compact ITT. Finally, the guidance concludes with several annexes to help facilitate data entry and monitoring processes.

The ITT Guidance has been drafted with several end readers in mind. Section II is appropriate for all readers, including the general public and those encountering the ITT for the first time. The primary audiences of the ITT Guidance are the AE and MCC M&E units, both of whom should have a complete understanding of the guidance in its entirety. Finally, the AE and MCC technical teams must also be familiar with the ITT, particularly with respect to their roles in reviewing and approving the ITT, and therefore sections V, VII, and VIII are of particular relevance to them.

Introduction to the ITT

Understanding the ITT Format

The ITT is comprised of detailed information for each indicator, including (i) indicator name; (ii) indicator level, unit, and classification; (iii) indicator baseline, and yearly and end of program targets; (iv) indicator data (i.e., reported values) through the current quarter; and (v) indicator progress towards yearly and end of program targets.

This information is recorded in one of two formats, referred to as the “Excel ITT” and the “MCC MIS ITT.” 7  All compacts are required to submit an MCC MIS ITT as part of the standard QDRP process. At this time, threshold programs do not use MCC MIS, so all threshold ITTs must be submitted in the Excel format. If required by MCC, compacts may also submit an Excel version of the ITT; however, this does not replace the requirement to submit the ITT through MCC MIS. The Excel ITT can be used to facilitate review by the AEs and during MCC country team (CT) technical review. If an Excel ITT is required, the finalized version should be uploaded as part of the MCC MIS QDRP under “Other Documents.” The two formats closely mirror each other; however, major distinctions between the formats are highlighted throughout this document.

For both ITT formats, the ITT grid allocates a row to each indicator, disaggregation or input, as specified in Annexes I and II of the M&E Plan. Figure I below displays the columns in the ITT template and the source for each column.

Figure I. Columns of Standard ITT Template and Source of Information

The first six columns in the ITT, plus the yearly and end of program target columns (columns A-F, H, K; referred to collectively as “indicator information”) are taken from Annexes I and/or II of the M&E Plan and populated by MCC M&E once an M&E Plan is approved. These columns are also updated by MCC M&E after the approval of an M&E Plan revision. The columns labeled “Quarterly Reporting” (columns G, M and N) are populated by the AE as part of the quarterly ITT submission cycle. Finally, the “Actual to Date” and percent complete columns (columns I, J, and L) are calculated based on existing information (i.e., the indicator information and quarterly reporting) included in the ITT. In Excel, these calculations are done manually by either the AE or the program’s RRA and in MCC MIS these fields are calculated automatically. Examples of the ITT in both formats can be found at the end of this section. Detailed guidance on each of these columns is found in Section III of this document while Section IV provides further information on how to populate the ITT in both the Excel and MCC MIS formats.

Understanding the ITT submission cycle

The ITT must be reported quarterly as part of the QDRP, beginning the quarter after approval of a program’s initial M&E Plan through program closure. Each ITT is prepared in a quarterly submission cycle, which begins approximately six weeks in advance of the AE’s formal submission of the QDRP.

The submission cycle is comprised of four phases, containing several steps each. In Phase I, the ITT is populated and internally reviewed by the AE. In Phase II, the ITT is reviewed by MCC M&E and any comments are addressed by the AE M&E unit. During this phase, approved updates may be made to historical data (i.e., data reported prior to the previous quarter). Depending on the complexity of the ITT and any noted issues, the M&E review may take several rounds of exchanges between the AE and MCC M&E units.

In (optional) Phase III, MCC recommends as best practice that the AE submits components of the QDRP, including the ITT, to the CT for technical review. Doing so allows the entire CT to review the ITT and raise any questions or data quality concerns before the official QDRP submission. In instances where a technical review is not conducted, CTs will first have access to the ITT during formal review, which minimizes the opportunity to resolve issues before QDRP approval. Finally, in Phase IV, the AE formally submits the entire QDRP, which includes the ITT. The submission cycle ends once the QDRP has been approved by MCC. Section V of this guidance describes the ITT submission cycle in detail.

Reporting monitoring data

Monitoring results from the ITT are used by AEs and MCC to track implementation progress, inform decision-making, and for reporting. Clearance of the QDRP includes clearance of ITT data through the current quarter. Once the ITT is approved, a variety of standard reports are updated using the most recent data available. Many of these reports focus on a subset of monitoring data, such as Common Indicators (CIs) or Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). Additionally, MCC regularly contributes to inter-agency reporting focused on government initiatives and makes complete ITT data available through ITT data exports. A summary of MCC’s reporting commitments and location of public reports can be found in Section VI of this document.

Variations of the ITT

M&E also requires two variations of the ITT that are due after the program end date. The Closeout ITT is due during the closure period and reports final figures for results achieved during program implementation. Particular emphasis is placed on the Closeout ITT as it is the final opportunity to document or update monitoring results achieved during the program period. In addition to the Closeout ITT, the AE and CT must prepare a supplemental table for each indicator, which documents any known data quality concerns and provides explanations for indicators that fail to meet or exceed their targets by more than 10 percent. These supplemental tables are saved in MCC MIS with the Closeout ITT and updated should new information that requires updates to the ITT become available post program. More information on the Closeout ITT and the supplemental tables can be found in Section VII of this guidance.

Finally, in the last year of implementation, each program must develop a Post Program M&E Plan. This M&E Plan includes a subset of indicators for which MCC and the partner country agree to report on post program. These indicators are included in a Post Program ITT, which is submitted annually by a partner government’s designated representative as part of the Annual Summary Report. Post Program ITTs are circulated within MCC but not made available externally. Please refer to Section VIII of this guidance for more details on the Post Program ITT and its format.

Figure II. MCC MIS ITT Format

Figure III. Excel ITT Format

The ITT Grid by Column

The ITT grid is created according to the standard ITT template for each format (i.e., the MCC MIS and Excel ITTs). Each main indicator and any associated disaggregations and inputs are ordered together in the ITT and referred to collectively as an “indicator family,” i.e., a collection of indicators grouped together to report on the same piece of information. Indicator families are organized by row in the ITT according to the main indicators’ hierarchical placement, level, and display order from Annex I. The hierarchical placement refers to the project, activity, or sub-activity an indicator is associated within the M&E Plan. Within each level of the program hierarchy, indicators are ordered by their indicator level. First, all goal indicators in the current level of program hierarchy are listed, followed by all outcome, output, and finally process indicators. Finally, within each indicator level, indicator families are placed in the same order as the indicators are listed in Annex I of the M&E Plan.

The grid also includes a variety of required columns from the three types of sources referenced in Section II: (i) Annexes I and II of the M&E Plan; (ii) quarterly reporting; and (iii) manual or automatic calculations. The remainder of this section provides detailed descriptions of each required column of the ITT grid, organized by source of the information. A particular emphasis is placed on what the different columns mean for AE reporting.

Note:  In addition to the required columns, MCC and the AE may choose to include additional information from the M&E Plan in the ITT if it would help facilitate data entry and review of the ITT. Common additional columns include indicator code, definition, and frequency of reporting. 8

Column Source: M&E Plan Annex I and II 9

Common Indicator

While most indicators are tailored to a specific program’s context, MCC M&E requires the use of common indicators wherever relevant to a program’s activities. MCC’s common indicators standardize measurements of progress across programs within commonly-funded sectors and allow MCC to aggregate results for reporting. 10

All common indicators must be measured in a manner consistent with the Common Indicator Guidance (or “CI Guidance”). Specifically, the following columns in the M&E Plan and ITT must match the CI Guidance exactly: (i) indicator name; (ii) definition; (iii) unit of measure; (iv) level; and (v) classification.

Within the ITT, the “Common Indicator” column identifies which indicators are common. All common indicators are designated with the appropriate common indicator code found in the CI Guidance. For example, the CI code E-6 designates the common indicator “Students participating in MCC-supported education activities.”

The CI Guidance also includes recommended disaggregations and inputs for each common indicator. Each common indicator disaggregation and input is also assigned a unique CI code, which is included in this column as well. For example, the CI codes E-6.1 and E-6.2 correspond to female and male students participating MCC-supported education activities.

If an indicator is not common, the Common Indicator column is blank.

Figure IV. Example CI Codes in Excel

Indicator Level

As defined in the MCC M&E Policy, MCC uses four standard indicator levels in its ITTs: (i) goal; (ii) outcome; (iii) output; and (iv) process. An indicator’s level is determined by the program logic and the specific results statement the indicator is designed to monitor.

Goal indicators quantify a program’s intended impact of economic growth and poverty reduction. As per MCC’s mandate, a program’s goal will generally be a direct measure of income. However, in instances where a program’s anticipated impact is an alternative measure of growth, such as increased sales, the program’s goal indicators will be defined accordingly.

Outcome indicators measure the intermediate effects of an activity or set of activities within the same intervention and are directly related through the program logic to the intervention’s outputs.

In many instances, an ITT may not contain goal or high-level outcome indicators because a measurable effect on these indicators will not be seen during the program lifecycle or may require a sample-based survey; such indicators will be reserved for measurement and reporting through an independent evaluation. Additionally, a program’s goal and outcome indicators may be similarly reserved for an independent evaluation if the interpretation of reported data requires careful analysis to understand changes or issues of attribution.

Output indicators describe and quantify the goods and services produced directly by the implementation of an intervention.

Process indicators measure the progress of a program’s activities and are used to ascertain whether the implementation work plan is proceeding on time.

Occasionally, an ITT may include an indicator that does not measure a specific results statement, but rather monitors a risk or assumption that is critical to the program logic. In these cases, the indicator is assigned the level “Risk / Assumption.”

Indicator Name: Indicator Families, Disaggregations, and Inputs

The “Indicator Name” column includes the name of each main indicator exactly as written in Annex I of the M&E Plan. Additionally, every disaggregation or input specified in the M&E Plan must also be provided its own row in the ITT. The Indicator Name column can thus be used to distinguish whether the specific ITT row is for a main indicator, disaggregation, or input.

Each indicator family contains one main indicator (e.g., “Stakeholders trained”). If the family contains only this main indicator, it is referred to as a single-tier indicator family, or simply an “indicator.” However, if the indicator has associated disaggregations or inputs, the indicator family is considered a multi-tier indicator family.

Disaggregations: Disaggregations report on distinct subsets of the main indicator. For example, if the AE would like to know how much of the total value recorded for an indicator is attributable to male and female participants, the AE would disaggregate the indicator by sex.

Typically, summing the values reported for the different subsets should equal the value reported for the main indicator. In some instances, however, an indicator may be disaggregated but the different sub-populations are not intended to add up to the main indicator. For example, the indicator “Average Annual Daily Traffic (AADT)” is frequently disaggregated by the different road segments where the AADT is measured. However, the AADT of each individual road segment cannot be added together to calculate a global AADT. Even in these cases where the disaggregations are not additive, the disaggregations should be representative of the entire population the indicator is tracking. In this example, if MCC is rehabilitating three road segments, each road segment should be included as a disaggregation to AADT.

A list of frequently used disaggregations can be found in Annex III of this document.

Inputs: Inputs are used to calculate common composite indicators, such as percentages, ratios, and averages and are frequently included in M&E Plans to verify the accuracy of data reported for the main indicator.  For example, the indicator “Percent disbursed of construction contracts” is calculated by dividing the “Value disbursed of construction contracts” by the “Value signed of construction contracts.” In this example, “Value disbursed” and “Value signed” are considered indicator inputs and should be included in the ITT to calculate the “Percent disbursed” actuals.

A list of all indicator input calculation types that may be included in the ITT can be found in Annex IV of this document.

An indicator family may include any combination of disaggregations and inputs but can be a maximum of three-tiers. For example, an indicator (e.g., “Stakeholders trained”) may be disaggregated by sex (e.g., “Female,” “Male”) and each disaggregation may be further disaggregated by land zone (e.g., “Rural,” “Urban”). However, the land zone disaggregations would represent the third tier and cannot be further disaggregated.

In both formats of the ITT, indicator families are grouped together with any second-tier or third-tier children placed immediately below the main indicator. All children are indented slightly from the main indicator to visually distinguish each tier of the indicator family. For disaggregations, the name of the main indicator may be omitted, and the disaggregation name placed in parentheses. The names of indicator inputs are included exactly as they are captured in Annex I of the M&E Plan.

Table I. Naming Conventions for Indicator Families with Disaggregations
Hierarchy Level Indicator Type Indicator Name
First-tier Main indicator Stakeholders trained
Second tier Disaggregation (Female) (Male)
Third-tier Disaggregation (Rurual) (Urban) (Rurual) (Urban)
Table II. Naming Conventions for Indicator Families with Inputs
Hierarchy Level Indicator Type Indicator Name (with Inputs)
First-tier Main indicator Percent disbursed of irrigation construction contracts
Second tier Input Value disbursed of construction contracts Value signed of construction contracts
Third-tier Disaggregation (Lot 1) (Lot 2) (Lot 1) (Lot 2)

Unit of Measure

All data in the ITT are reported in the Unit specified in the “Unit of Measure” column. For example, if a $1 million contract has been signed that is applicable to an indicator “Value of signed educational facility construction, rehabilitation, and equipping contracts” and the unit of measure is “US Dollars,” the actual must be reported as “1,000,000.” Similarly, if fifty percent of signed contract values have been disbursed for the indicator “Percent disbursed of educational facility construction, rehabilitation, and equipping contracts,” and the unit of measure is “Percent,” the actual must be reported as “50,” not “0.50” or “50%.”

Units are limited to those on the standard list of units established by MCC and included in this document as Annex V. AEs may request to add additional types of units to the list, if necessary. Any requests for new units must be made and approved by MCC’s Senior Director of Monitoring before the M&E Plan is finalized.

Indicator Classification

MCC M&E has five standard indicator classifications: (i) level; (ii) cumulative; (iii) date; (iv) level (average); and (v) level (cumulative). The indicator classification identifies how data are reported in the ITT.

Level indicators report the total measured during the reporting period. Each actual is calculated independently of previous reporting periods. These indicators are used to track trends over time and may fluctuate up or down depending on performance.

For level indicators, the reporting period may vary based on the indicator’s definition and the frequency of available data. Unless data for a level indicator are reported quarterly, it should not be assumed that an actual reported for a level indicator only measures the quarter the actual is reported in. For example, “Dropout rate” for a primary school program is generally reported annually. However, an annual actual recorded will measure all students who dropped out at any point in the school year. The relevant report frequency for each indicator is documented in Annex I of the M&E Plan. Additionally, if different from the report frequency, the M&E Plan should also clearly document the reporting period that each data point covers.

Cumulative indicators report the total progress achieved throughout the program, up to the current quarter. Each reported actual includes the previously reported data point plus any progress made during the current reporting period. The total progress made during the current period is referred to as the incremental actual (i.e., the difference between the cumulative total reported in the current reporting period and the cumulative total reported in the previous period).

For example, if 1,000 instructors have been trained between Q1 and Q9 of a program and an additional 200 instructors are trained during Q10, the cumulative total for Q10 is 1,200. In this example, the incremental actual is 200.

Date indicators use calendar dates (in the format DD-MMM-YY) instead of numbers as targets and actual values. A date indicator records the date a milestone is accomplished in the quarter it is achieved.

For example, an AE may identify signing a partnership agreement by a certain date as a critical step to accomplishing the program’s objectives. In this case, the M&E Plan may include the indicator “Signed partnership agreement” with a target of 30-Aug-14. The date the partnership agreement is signed, 28-Oct-14, is entered as the actual.

Level (Average) indicators are similar to level indicators in that they track trends over time and may fluctuate up and down. However, a level (average) indicator measures annual progress by comparing the yearly target to an average of all actuals recorded during the program year. Level (average) indicators are most useful when data are available on a quarterly or semi-annual basis, but progress is most appropriately assessed for the whole year and not solely according to the most current quarter. Level (average) indicators are frequently used for utility data, in particular when certain seasonal factors (such as droughts) may render a single quarter an inaccurate representation of overall indicator progress.

For example, the indicator “Available power plant generation capacity” records the minimum dependable capacity of a hydropower plant within a quarter to supply power. The target for the year is 75 megawatts of generation capacity. However, the dependable capacity varies drastically between the wet season (Q1 and Q2) and the dry season (Q3 and Q4). In Q1 and Q2, the power plant can generate at least 100 megawatts of power at any time. However, in Q3 and Q4, this value falls to 50 megawatts of power at any time. The annual average for this indicator is 75 megawatts, which meets the target.

Level (Cumulative) indicators track the cumulative value for each program year. At the beginning of the subsequent program year, the cumulative calculation begins again at zero. Level (cumulative) indicators are used when the AE would like to monitor annual progress in situations where annual progress from separate program years are not additive. Level (cumulative) indicators are frequently used for indicators with an annual life cycle, such as annual budgets or crop yields. With these indicators, targets are set annually, so adding data from separate program years would not generate meaningful data points.

For example, the indicator “School budget spent by principals” tracks the total amount of the budget spent in the current year. If $1,000,000 was spent between Q1 and Q3 of a program and an additional $250,000 was spent in both Q4 and Q5, the cumulative value for Q4 would be 1,250,000. Between Q4 (i.e., the last quarter in program year 1) and Q5 (i.e., the first quarter in program year 2), the aggregation would reset and the cumulative value for Q5 would be 250,000.

Level (cumulative) indicators are also used for some common indicators that may be reported either quarterly or annually to ensure that end-of-year actuals are comparable across programs.

Indicator Baseline and Targets

Figure V. Example of Baselines and Targets in MCC MIS

M&E requires that indicators have baselines, and yearly and end of program targets, which are used to track an indicator’s progress over the life of the program. 11 Generally, targets are included for all indicators for all program years in which progress is expected. Depending on whether the aim of the indicator is to increase or decrease over time, targets may be greater than or less than the baseline. The end of program target should always equal the last yearly target. Some indicators are included in the ITT to monitor a critical risk or another action not attributable to MCC’s intervention, in which case a target should not be assigned. Additionally, some indicators may have “To be Determined (TBD)” baselines or targets, particularly early in the program life cycle.

Baselines and targets are not usually required for disaggregations; however, when progress on a disaggregation is critical to a program’s success, e.g., results for women for an intervention focused on women, targets may be required for such disaggregations. Finally, when the baseline of a main indicator in the M&E Plan is zero, the baselines for all disaggregations and inputs are assumed to be zero and populated as such in the ITT.

Column Source: AE Quarterly Reporting

Quarterly Actuals

Each ITT includes columns in which to report data, one for each quarter of the program. The recorded data points are commonly referred to as “actuals.” For compact ITTs, there will always be twenty actuals columns, i.e., one to correspond to each quarter of the five-year program. The number of columns in a threshold program ITT will depend on the length of the program.

Most ITT quarters will span exactly a three-month period, corresponding to each quarter of the calendar year. However, the length of the first and last “quarter” in an ITT will vary depending on the program start date. If a program’s entry into force (EIF) is within 45 days of the start of a new fiscal quarter (i.e., EIF dates between August 16 – September 30; November 16 – December 31, February 14 – March 31, or May 16 – June 30), the first quarter of the program will span the remainder of the existing quarter and the entirety of the following quarter. This is referred to as a long first quarter. Subsequently, all programs with a long first quarter will have a short final quarter.

For example, if a program EIFs on March 15th, the first quarter in the ITT will span from March 15th – June 30th. The final quarter of the same program will span from January 1st – March 14th.  If a program EIFs more than 45 days before the start of a new fiscal quarter, the ITT will have a short first quarter and a long final quarter.

The frequency with which data are reported for each indicator depends on the indicator’s definition, frequency of reporting, classification, and implementation timeline. In particular, in the first year of a program, very little data may be reported as implementation works are just commencing.

Once monitoring data are available, cumulative and level (cumulative) indicators must be recorded in all quarters after the first actual is entered. Level and level (average) indicators may be recorded at any frequency, as specified in the M&E Plan. However, level (average) indicators are frequently recorded on a quarterly or semi-annual basis. Date indicators may only be reported once during the program. All actuals must adhere to the formatting guidelines described in further detail in Section IV below.

Notes Columns

The “Detailed Data Source” and “Comments” columns, are referred to collectively as the “Notes columns” and are updated quarterly. The Detailed Data Source column must be completed for every indicator reporting data and should include the document name, date, page or table number, and file type of the primary data source. The Comments column should be populated with important context for an indicator, including explanations about data quality concerns or declining cumulative indicators, explanations for anticipated data that have been delayed, estimates for when new data will be available, and any other information that is necessary to accurately interpret the actuals reported. Additionally, for indicators that report financial data, if the ITT unit differs from the currency used in the primary data source, the exchange rate used to calculate each actual should be specified in the Comments column. If the data reported for an indicator are straightforward and easily interpretable, the Comments column may be left blank.

In the event that the necessary information is too detailed to comfortably fit in the Comments column, the M&E Lead and AE may agree to report more detailed information in an ITT Progress Report. 12

Column Source: Calculation

Actual to Date

The “Actual to Date” column is used to report the most recent data available for each indicator. For level, cumulative, and date indicators, this column displays the most recently reported actual. For level (average) indicators, this column includes the average of all data reported in the current year of the program. 13  For level (cumulative) indicators, this column is updated yearly, once data have been reported for all quarters of a program year. If no data are available for an indicator, this column is left blank.

Figure VI. Example of Calculation Columns in Excel

Progress to Date

The yearly percent complete and “Percent Complete to Date” columns assess indicator progress against yearly and end of program targets. Indicator progress will be assessed in these columns by one of two metrics of progress: (i) percent complete; or (ii) date. In most cases, indicator progress is measured by calculating the percent of the target value achieved, referred to as the “Percent complete.” Percent complete is calculated for an indicator by dividing the most recent relevant actual by the target value. If the indicator has a non-zero baseline, the baseline value is subtracted from the actual and target. For date indicators, progress is assessed by a binary metric of “Pending” if the indicator has not been achieved and “Complete” if the indicator has been achieved.

In some instances, assessing indicator progress requires more context than can be provided by the percent complete calculation alone. For many indictors, exceeding the target means that we have achieved even more of a desirable result than planned. This is true for many cumulative indicators, such as those counting the number of participants enrolled in a program or the number of infrastructure projects built. However, in some cases, exceeding a target is considered less desirable than meeting it exactly. For example, the indicator “Power plant availability” measures the amount of hours in a month that a plant is able and available to produce electricity as a percentage of the total number of hours in a month. The target is 95 percent because the power plant requires some non-operating time, to allow for repairs and regular maintenance. Exceeding the target could indicate poor management of the facility and ultimately costly breakdowns of machinery.

For indicators where exceeding a target represents a less desirable outcome than meeting it exactly, or other cases where the percent complete formula might not be informative on its own, additional context should be provided in the Comments column of the ITT. For example, the AE and MCC might opt to include the “percent deviation” metric in the Comments column as this assesses indicator progress by measuring the relative distance of an actual from the target. An actual that exceeds the target by a value “x” has the same percent deviation as an actual that falls short of the target by the same value “x.”; in other words, exceeding a target by a large margin would look just as undesirable as failing to meet it by a large margin. Percent deviation may also be provided as a supplemental metric to represent program progress in MCC-generated reports. 14

The specific formulas for each metric of progress are given below.

Table III. Metrics of Progress Formulas
Metric of Progress Formula
Percent Complete (Actual – Baseline) / (Target – Baseline)
Date indicator “Pending” or “Complete”
– This column is not calculated for date indicators until the program year in which the target date is set. Once achieved, the yearly percent complete columns for all future program years are changed to “Complete.”
(Optional) Percent Deviation |Actual – Target| / Target
– For Percent Deviation indicators, the objective is for the metric to be as close to zero as possible.
– If used, the Percent deviation calculation should be reported in the Comments column. It should not replace the calculation of the Percent Complete calculation in the percent complete columns.

Please see Annex VI for more details on the metrics of progress and when they should be applied.

Entering Data in the ITT

Each quarter, seven standard columns are updated in the ITT: (i) current quarter, (ii) previous quarter, (iii) yearly percent complete, 15 (iv) Actual to Date, (v) end of program percent complete, (vi) Detailed Data Source, and (vii) Comments. Updates are made through a combination of manual data entry done by the AE and automatic calculations done by Excel formulas or the MCC MIS.

Put simply, the AE should adhere to the following steps when entering actuals or notes in the ITT:

  1. Locate the quarter for which data must be added.
    1. ITT data should be reported in the quarter the data are measuring, not the quarter in which the data become available.
  2. Locate an indicator for which data must be added.
  3. Click on the cell for the desired indicator and quarter.
  4. Enter the actual according to the classification and hierarchy-level requirements.
    1. The classification and hierarchy-level requirements may also differ by ITT format. The differences in data entry between the Excel and MCC MIS ITTs are described further below.
  5. Enter the detailed data source and comments, when necessary.
  6. Save as needed.

As noted in step IV above, the method for entering and calculating ITT data depends on the structure, classification, and calculation types of each indicator family, as well as the format of the ITT. The remainder of this section provides guidelines for how data should be entered in the ITT based on the classification and the number of tiers of the indicator family.

For single-tier indicator families, actuals are entered based on the indicator’s classification.

Entering Data for Level and Level (Average) Indicators

Data must be reported as they are provided from the primary data source or calculated by the AE. The figures below provide an example of a level indicator “Retention rate of students in MCC-funded Bachelor’s programs” in the MCC MIS and Excel ITT formats. In this example, the retention rate is reported bi-annually.

Figure VII. Level Indicator in MCC MIS

Figure VIII. Level Indicator in Excel

Entering Data for Cumulative and Level (Cumulative) Indicators

When entering data for cumulative and level (cumulative) indicators, it is important to remember the distinction between cumulative totals and incremental actuals.

  • The cumulative total is the total progress achieved to-date, including all progress accomplished during the current quarter. The total progress achieved spans either the entire program for cumulative indicators or during the current program year for level (cumulative) indicators.
  • The incremental actual is the total progress made during the current quarter.

In the MCC MIS format of the ITT, the AE must report the incremental actual for cumulative and level (cumulative) indicators in the orange bars placed immediately below each indicator. After saving the ITT, the cumulative totals are automatically calculated.

In the example below, 72 educational facilities have been constructed between Q1 and Q19, with 11 facilities constructed in Q19 specifically. For Q19, 11 is the incremental actual and 72 is the cumulative total.

Figure IX. Cumulative Indicator in MCC MIS

Alternatively, in the Excel format of the ITT, the AE must report the cumulative totals for cumulative and level (cumulative) indicators. It is recommended that the AE use Excel formulas to calculate cumulative totals by referencing the previous quarter’s actual and adding the incremental actual.

Figure X. Cumulative Indicator in Excel

In both formats, once an actual is reported for a cumulative or level (cumulative) indicator, the indicator should be updated quarterly. If no change has occurred since the previous quarter, the cumulative total from the previous quarter should be repeated in the Excel ITT. In the MCC MIS ITT, an incremental actual of zero should be entered for the indicator.
Cumulative indicators are not expected to decline and any decreases that do occur should be thoroughly explained in the Comments column.

Entering Data for Date Indicators

In MCC MIS, after selecting the current or previous quarter cell for a date indicator, an image of a calendar will appear. Navigate to and select the appropriate date.

Figure XI. Data Entry for Date Indicators in MCC MIS

In Excel, the AE must report dates manually using the format DD-MMM-YY, e.g., 28-Oct-14.

Figure XII. Data Entry for Date Indicators in Excel

Only one date may be entered per date indicator and it must be recorded in the program quarter in which the date occurred.

Entering Data for Multi-Tier Indicator Families

In MCC MIS, data entry for multi-tier indicator families (i.e., families that include disaggregations or inputs) is determined by the structure of the family as well as the classification. In most cases, data can only be inputted at the lowest tier of a multi-tier indicator family. After saving the ITT, MCC MIS will then automatically calculate the value of the main indicator based on the values entered for the disaggregations or inputs and the type of calculation specified in the M&E Plan.

Figure XIII. Example of Multi-Tier Indicator Family

For quarters where complete disaggregated data are not available, the Unspecified disaggregation is used to ensure the main indicator calculates correctly. If data are not available for one or more of the children, or if the sum of available data for the disaggregations does not equal the main indicator, the difference between the main indicator and the value(s) available for the disaggregations should be entered in the Unspecified disaggregation. For cumulative and level (cumulative) indicators, if disaggregation data are originally unavailable but become available at a later date, the unspecified total should be subtracted from the indicator in the first quarter for which complete disaggregation data are available. If all disaggregated data are available, the AE must not enter any data, including zeros, into the Unspecified disaggregation.

When an indicator family includes multiple disaggregation types at the same tier (e.g., multiple second-tier disaggregations), only one disaggregation type is used to calculate the main indicator value. However, the sums of the disaggregations for each disaggregation type should be equal. In the example below, “Number of formal connections” is disaggregated by sex (i.e., female, male) and by connection type (i.e. newly connected, reconnected). Although only the connection type disaggregations are used to calculate the main indicator, the sum of sex disaggregations also equals 700, the value calculated for the main indicator.

Figure XIV. Indicator Family with Two Disaggregation Types

In some cases, an indicator family may consist of a main indicator and disaggregations that are not intended to be added together to equal the main indicator value. This occurs when it does not make mathematical sense for the parent indicator to equal the sum of the children. In these cases, the AE must enter the value for the main indicator, as well as the values of all of the disaggregations, directly into the MCC MIS ITT.

Figure XV. Non-Aggregable Indicator Family

In Excel, data can be entered at any level of an indicator family, including the main indicator and all disaggregations or inputs. Since the value of the main indicator is not calculated automatically, the AE and RRA should verify the value reported for the main indicator equals the sum of all disaggregations reported. If requested by MCC, the AE or RRA may add formulas to the ITT to calculate parent values for disaggregations and inputs.

Updating Calculations and Notes Columns

In MCC MIS, the Actual to Date, and yearly and program percent complete columns are automatically calculated for indicators upon saving the ITT actuals. The AE is responsible for reviewing the information for their knowledge but does not need to do any further work for these columns.

In Excel, the Actual to Date, and yearly and percent complete columns are updated using Excel formulas. The AE or RRA is responsible for updating the formulas each quarter and ensuring the formulas correctly calculate these columns according to the guidance provided in Section III and Annex VI.

When using automatic formulas anywhere in the ITT, it is strongly recommended that the AE and MCC designate either the AE or the RRA as the official “owner” of all calculations, and responsible for verifying formulas are correct and updated quarterly. Doing so should minimize errors that may occur when ownership over the formulas is divided or unclear.

In both the Excel and MCC MIS ITTs, the AE must review the Notes columns each quarter and make manual updates when necessary. All text reported in these two columns automatically carries over from the previous quarter’s approved ITT. The AE is responsible for reviewing the notes and updating the fields with the most recent information.

Indicator Input Worksheets

In some cases, monitoring data may need to undergo calculations before they can be accurately captured in the ITT. A common example of this is when data for an indicator are available on a monthly basis but must be reported in the ITT quarterly. Where it is helpful to do so, the program’s RRA may create indicator input worksheets in the Excel ITT so that any required calculations can be done by the RRA or AE within the ITT file. For AEs submitting the ITT exclusively in MCC MIS, an indicator inputs worksheet may be created as a stand-alone Excel file that is submitted with the QDRP each quarter under the “Other Documents” field. These worksheets can help ensure that actuals are calculated correctly and transparently. They may take the format most useful for the AE and MCC M&E.

Formatting Data in Excel

In addition to data entry, the AE must ensure all data and additional columns in the Excel ITT are formatted correctly. Formatting is automatic in MCC MIS and no work is required by the AE. Below is a summary of key formatting requirements. A comprehensive list of all formatting guidelines can be found in Annex VII.

Formatting actuals and the Actual to Date: All actuals must be entered to two decimal places and include commas for thousand separators. The cells should not contain any non-numerical characters.

Formatting metrics of progress: Percent complete formulas must be formatted as percentages with no decimals. If no target is provided or the target is TBD, the Percent Complete column should be shaded. If a target is provided but no progress has been recorded, the Percent Complete column should be “0%.”

Formatting Notes columns: All text in the Detailed Data Source and Comments columns must be written in English and without typos. 16 The cell text must be wrapped and all text viewable.

Shading and Blank Cells: In the Excel ITT, shading can be used to distinguish cells for which data are not expected from situations where data are expected but have not been reported. This formatting is intended to facilitate ITT reviews if there is enough information about when reporting is expected (e.g., information from implementation work plans or the data source is a standard annual report) but is not required. When data are expected but are not available, the cell should be left unshaded and blank. All historical percent complete cells should be shaded if no calculation is required.

Figure XVI. Standard Cell Formatting in the Excel ITT

shading

blank cell

Quarterly ITT Submission Cycle

The ITT is officially submitted by the AE to MCC as part of the QDRP and provides information related to program progress, which is necessary for the AE to obtain spending authority from MCC for the upcoming program quarter. 17 In order to provide sufficient time for review and approval before the start of a new disbursement period, the QDRP must be submitted to MCC for approval at least twenty days prior to the end of each quarter (i.e., on March 10, June 10, September 10, and December 10; or the following business day if the 10th falls on a weekend or holiday). Given the complexity of the ITT and the amount of time needed for preparation and internal review, the ITT submission cycle, begins with an email from the RRA to AE M&E unit, well in advance of the QDRP due date, i.e., roughly six weeks before the end of the quarter. 18 However, preparation for the ITT should be a continuous process with the AE receiving and reviewing data sources as they become available throughout the program quarter.

The remainder of this section details the four phases of the ITT submission cycle that were outlined in Section II of this document. In particular, each phase identifies the applicable role, an approximate timeline to complete the steps, and where the submission cycle differs based on the format of the ITT. Each quarter, the RRA should provide a detailed timeline, including each step of the ITT review process and the date by which the step must be completed. A simplified diagram of the quarterly submission cycle and a template of the detailed timeline can both be found in Annex VIII; however, the RRA should update the timeline quarterly with specific dates, taking into account non-working days and program-specific factors.

Phase I: Preparing the ITT

Phase I Step IA: Preparing the Quarterly ITT Template in Excel

Role: MCC M&E Program RRA
Applicable For: All programs submitting an Excel ITT 19
Timeline: Six (6) weeks before the QDRP due date

Each quarter, the assigned MCC M&E RRA will email the upcoming quarter’s Excel ITT template to the AE M&E Director for all MCC programs in implementation that require the Excel ITT. The Excel ITT template leaves editable the current quarter and most recent previous quarter’s actuals, the Actual to Date, Percent Complete to Date, and Notes columns. All other cells in the ITT are locked and can only be unlocked by the RRA.

In addition to the ITT, the RRA should provide a quarterly timeline for the ITT submission cycle and any updates to the submission process for the current quarter.

Phase I Step IB: Beginning the Quarterly ITT Submission Cycle in MIS

Role: MCC M&E Program RRA
Applicable For: All programs submitting in MIS only
Timeline: Six (6) weeks before the QDRP due date

Six weeks before the QDRP due date, the RRA is responsible for emailing the AE M&E unit and asking them to begin inputting ITT data in MCC MIS. In MIS, the current quarter’s ITT is automatically created as soon as the previous quarter’s QDRP is officially approved by MCC; the preparation of a quarterly ITT Template is not required. Additionally, the RRA’s email should include the quarterly timeline for ITT review and any updates to the submission process for the current quarter.

Phase I, Step II: Completing the Draft ITT and AE Internal Review

Role: AE M&E Unit and AE technical leads, cross-cutting personnel, and management
Applicable For: All programs
Timeline: From six (6) to four (4) weeks before the QDRP due date

Once the AE M&E unit receives the ITT template or email, they may begin populating the ITT. During this step, the AE M&E unit is responsible for: (i) entering any data available for the current quarter; (ii) updating the previous quarter’s data with finalized figures; (iii) adding any relevant indicator comments or detailed data sources; and (iv) reviewing all historical data to see if historical updates are needed. 20 Additionally, if the draft ITT is being prepared in Excel, the AE must update all relevant calculation columns.

M&E is committed to including the most accurate, up-to-date information in the ITT while recognizing that complete quarter data is not possible for the quarter in which the ITT is being prepared (i.e., the quarter in which the QDRP is submitted) due to the QDRP deadline. For each indicator, the AE and MCC M&E units should work together to determine the most recent data that can be provided. For most indicators, minimally, the first month of the quarter in which the QDRP is submitted should be included in the ITT. However, more recent data can be reported if easily obtained and verifiable.

Once the draft ITT is prepared, it must also be reviewed internally by the AE, including program technical leads, relevant cross-cutting personnel, and AE management. The process for internal review may vary based on the structure of the AE, its M&E unit, and the projects being implemented. However, the following recommendations are provided:

  • Be proactive, not reactive. The M&E unit should not assume all data shared by the technical leads represent all data available. The M&E unit should meet directly with AE project personnel and discuss each relevant indicator in the ITT. Whenever possible, the M&E Unit should obtain ITT data directly from the primary data source.
  • Data collection is ongoing. Whenever possible, the AE should obtain and review primary data sources when they become available and be prepared to enter the data as soon as the ITT submission cycle begins.
  • Clarify indicators early. The AE is responsible for ensuring reported data are consistent with the indicator’s definition. In support of that, the M&E unit should review all indicators and their definitions with the technical leads in the context of developing or modifying the M&E Plan, and well in advance of the quarterly reporting process. Additionally, the AE should clarify the requested format of the quarterly data submission.
  • Engage with the project personnel. The M&E unit should participate in sectoral meetings and deliverable reviews to have a general understanding of program progress.
  • Flag any known data issues before submission. If the AE M&E unit is aware of a data issue, this should be documented in the Comments column of the ITT upon submission of the initial draft so that MCC can begin exploring possible solutions and mitigation measures as soon as possible.

Within the first year of program implementation, it is strongly recommended that the AE M&E unit submit a program-specific process for managing the quarterly ITT submissions. This document should describe how data will be collected from the responsible parties and the review and approval process within the AE. This information may be included in the M&E Plan, an M&E manual, or as a stand-alone document. An example of an AE process map is included in this document as Annex IX.

Approximately one month prior to the QDRP due date, the AE should have completed its internal review of the ITT and submitted the first draft to the RRA. Once the draft ITT is completed in MCC MIS, the AE M&E unit should alert the RRA by email that the draft is ready for review. In addition to the draft ITT, the AE M&E unit should submit via email, or other agreed means, all source documentation cited for the current and previous quarter, a summary of any requested changes to historical data, and the ITT Progress Report, if required for the program.

Phase II: M&E Review and Historical Updates

Phase II Step I: M&E Review of the ITT

Role: MCC M&E Lead, RRA, and AE M&E Unit
Applicable For: All programs
Timeline: From four (4) to two (2) weeks before the QDRP due date

After receiving the draft ITT, or notification that the draft ITT is ready for review in MCC MIS, the RRA and MCC M&E Lead have five (5) business days to review the draft ITT and submit any requested clarifications or corrections to the AE. The RRA and MCC M&E Lead should not make changes directly to the ITT.

During the M&E review, the RRA is responsible for verifying all actuals against the source documentation provided by the AE M&E unit, ensuring that calculations are correct, that entered data are consistent with the indicator information, and that the formatting is correct. The M&E Lead is responsible for a comprehensive review of the data, including confirming that the data align with implementation timelines and that the Comments column sufficiently explains any delays or irregular data. If necessary, the M&E Lead may review actuals or comments with members of the CT during this period. If any significant data quality or ITT compliance issues emerge during this review, the M&E Lead should raise these with the Resident Country Director (RCD) during this phase to allow appropriate time for management to respond. Additionally, the M&E Lead will review and provide feedback on the ITT Progress Report during this period, if applicable.

Once the review period is complete, the RRA will compile all feedback and submit to the AE via email. After receiving MCC’s feedback, the AE M&E unit has an additional five (5) business days to review the comments and update the ITT accordingly. Near the end of these five (5) days, it is highly recommended that the MCC M&E Lead, RRA, and AE M&E unit meet to discuss any questions or lingering issues.

Depending on the specific issues flagged in the ITT, several rounds of review may be required. In some instances, internal M&E review may overlap with CT technical review (if applicable). However, the AE and MCC M&E units should make their best effort to complete their internal review at least two weeks before the QDRP due date, or by the time that the QDRP is submitted for technical review.

Phase II, Step II: Historical Actual Change Requests

Role: AE M&E Unit
Applicable For: All programs
Timeline: From six (6) to two (2) weeks before the QDRP due date

By default, all historical actuals are finalized and locked in both the Excel and MCC MIS formats. However, occasionally, updates to historical data may be required if new data become available or if a previously unknown issue emerges. In these cases, the AE M&E unit may request that historical data sections be made available for updates. To do so, the AE M&E unit must send a Historical Actual Change Request (HACR) via email (for Excel ITTs) or MCC MIS (for MCC MIS ITTs). In the HACR, the AE M&E unit must provide (i) the indicators affected; (ii) the quarters affected; (iii) original and revised data points; and (iv) the reason for requested change. HACRs may be submitted at any time during Phase I or II of the ITT submission cycle. However, it is strongly recommended that HACRs are submitted as soon as possible to ensure all requests are approved before CT technical review.

After an AE M&E unit submits the HACR, the RRA and M&E Lead must strive to review and approve or deny the request within three (3) business days.

If the AE M&E unit is submitting the draft ITT in Excel, the RRA will unlock the applicable cells in the draft ITT, highlighting all unlocked cells. When the draft ITT is shared with the AE M&E unit for additional updates, the AE M&E unit is responsible for making any changes to historical data points. 21  At this point, the RRA must submit a HACR in MCC MIS to reflect all approved changes.

If the AE M&E unit is submitting the draft ITT in MCC MIS, they also must submit the HACR directly through MCC MIS. In the MCC MIS HACR, the AE M&E unit is responsible for both providing the justification and making the historical changes to the data simultaneously. If the HACR is approved, the MCC MIS ITT is automatically updated with the HACR values.

Optional Phase IIIA: Country Team Technical Review

Role: MCC Program Country Team
Applicable For: All programs
Timeline: Approximately two (2) weeks before the QDRP due date

MCC recommends as a best practice that the AE submit a draft QDRP for technical review approximately 10 days prior to the required QDRP submission date. Since this step is part of the broader QDRP package, MCC’s program Point of Contact (POC) manages the workflow. More details on the process for technical reviews can be found in the QDRP Guidance.

During technical review, the entire CT has the opportunity to review and provide feedback on the ITT. In particular, the CT’s technical leads and cross-cutting specialists in Economic Analysis (EA), Gender and Social Inclusion (GSI), and Environmental and Social Performance (ESP) are asked to review all relevant indicators. The M&E Lead may also use this period to direct targeted questions to team members on specific indicators for which outstanding questions remain. At the end of the technical review period, the M&E Lead should review all comments related to the ITT and ensure clarity to facilitate AE review. Feedback on the ITT will be included as part of MCC’s broader package of feedback on the draft QDRP.

If the CT and AE choose not to have a technical review, the ITT is not circulated to the CT until formal review. In these instances, the AE and MCC M&E units may proceed directly to Phase IVB or adjust the submission cycle timeline to allow more time for Phases I and II. Additionally, the M&E Lead may use this time to reach out to members of the CT directly about specific questions related to the ITT.

Optional Phase IIIB: Upload the Excel ITT in MCC MIS

Role: AE M&E Unit
Applicable For: All programs submitting an Excel ITT in MCC MIS
Timeline: Five (5) to three (3) days before the QDRP due date

After all comments from MCC have been addressed, and the Excel ITT has been informally cleared by the RRA, the AE M&E unit must update the MCC MIS ITT to match the Excel ITT. The AE M&E unit must take care to ensure all data are properly reported in MCC MIS, including where there are variations in reporting requirements between the Excel and MCC MIS ITT formats. Additionally, the AE M&E unit is required to upload the finalized Excel ITT as an attachment to the QDRP in MCC MIS.

Before the QDRP is submitted for formal review, the RRA verifies that the MCC MIS ITT data matches the Excel ITT data exactly. The RRA will communicate any issues in the MCC MIS ITT to the AE M&E unit, and the AE M&E unit should strive to address these issues prior to the QDRP due date.

Phase IV: Formal Review and Approval

Role: MCC Program Country Team
Applicable For: All programs
Timeline: QDRP due date through the end of the quarter

After submitting the QDRP for formal review, MCC has a final opportunity to review the ITT. During formal review, the RRA should confirm that all previous questions raised by MCC have been addressed and no new issues with the ITT have emerged. Additionally, if a member of the CT has any concerns about sensitive data, poor data quality, or other possible risks, these must be mentioned to the M&E Lead during formal review, if not already raised previously. After the QDRP has been submitted, it is no longer possible for the AE M&E unit to update the MCC MIS ITT. However, the RRA may make minor adjustments to the MCC MIS ITT up to the moment the QDRP is approved.

After QDRP approval, all indicator data are considered final and are reported as such in a number of standard reports, summarized further in the next section of this guidance. Therefore, approval by CT members on the QDRP includes approval of ITT data for reporting. Note that issues with one or more specific indicators are not in and of themselves a reason for a CT member to reject a QDRP; rather, these issues should be raised with M&E as soon as possible so they can be resolved with the AE M&E unit. However, persistent ITT issues, including persistent data quality concerns or missing data, may be a reason to reject a QDRP.

Detailed Data Sources

Primary data sources must be submitted via email for every newly reported data point in the ITT each quarter. This source documentation will be reviewed by the RRA each quarter and compared against the data reported in the ITT. MCC M&E is required to maintain a repository of these data sources for all indicators and all quarters for which new data have been submitted.

The structure of the repository should be agreed upon by the M&E Lead and RRA and may vary based on the types of indicators and data sources provided. For example, if multiple indicators are provided quarterly from the same data source (as is common with utility data), it may make sense to organize files by data source. However, when the majority of indicators have a unique data source, it may be more beneficial to organize the repository by indicator. At a minimum, the repository should be structured in such a way that any actual can be easily and independently verified by those not assigned to work on the program.

The AE M&E unit should be informed of the structure of the repository so data sources can be organized in support of said structure. When organizing data sources, MCC M&E recommends the following best practices:

  • Clearly label document names. Documents should be renamed to inform the user of the information included in the document and its relevance to the ITT. For example, if the repository is organized by indicator, each document name could include the indicator name and quarter of the data point. The naming convention should be consistent throughout implementation of the program.
  • Highlight data points. If an ITT actual is taken from a file with a substantial amount of additional information, the specific data point(s) used to populate the ITT ought to be highlighted.
  • Submit complete documents. Primary data sources should be submitted in their entirety to provide additional context for each data point. These should be accompanied by any additional reference sheets used to transform the data into the format necessary for ITT reporting, when not already included as an indicator input worksheet.

Factors to Consider during Review

During their respective reviews, the AE, M&E Lead, RRA, and CT members should be mindful of the reporting period under review and confirm that all data measure progress as of the reporting period in which the data are entered. When it is not possible to report progress through the end of the reporting period (for example, if a report including more recent data will only be available after the QDRP is submitted), the comments column should include a note specifying the date through which the currently reported data is accurate. Additionally, the reviewer should consider the different types of data quality issues commonly found in ITTs, discussed in further detail below. Annex X also provides individualized checklists for the AE M&E Director, RRA, M&E Lead, and CT member to help facilitate their review of the ITT.

Data Entry Errors

The AE and RRA are responsible for ensuring that all data entered are consistent with the indicator’s detailed information, including the definition, classification, report frequency, and unit.  Common data entry errors include:

  • Transcription errors: Errors in copying data from the primary data source for the ITT. Source documentation must be submitted with the draft ITT for this reason, and the AE and RRA are responsible for verifying the ITT actual matches the data reported in the primary data source.
  • Classification errors: A common cause of data entry errors is inconsistency with the indicator’s classification. For example, once an actual has been reported for a cumulative indicator, data must be reported for all future quarters. Additionally, both level (average) and level (cumulative) indicators have unique methods to calculate Actual to Date and percent complete information. These distinctions are frequently overlooked in the ITT.
  • Entering unmeasured zeros: Zeros should not be entered in either ITT format unless they have been measured. For example, the indicator “Number of days road is impassable” may have an actual of zero if the road is passable every day of the year. However, if the number of days the road was impassable during a quarter is unknown, no actual should be entered. Reporting should not begin on an indicator until a non-zero actual is reported. For example, no data should be reported for the indicator “Stakeholders trained” until at least one stakeholder has completed training.
  • Calculation errors (Excel format only): The AE is required to use Excel formulas to facilitate calculation of the Actual to Date, percent complete columns, and formulas are strongly recommended for main indicators when disaggregations or inputs are present. The AE and RRA are responsible for ensuring all formulas are defined to equal the correct calculation for the indicator and reference the most recent relevant quarter’s data.

“Irregular Data” Concerns

Irregular data refer to reporting on an indicator that does not adhere to reasonable expectations for indicator progress. This includes indicators with actuals that rapidly increase or decrease across quarters, indicators that considerably exceed or fall short of a target, reporting that does not align with the implementation timeline, or other irregularities. Irregular data indicate that there may be an issue related to the monitoring of an indicator. Possible causes include inconsistent data sources, a misunderstood indicator definition, missing deliverables, or deeper underlying data quality issues.

All irregular data should be explored fully by the MCC and AE M&E units in consultation with program staff and any corrections made to the ITT before it is finalized. Additionally, irregular data do not always mean the data are incorrect. In instances where data appear irregular but have been confirmed to be correct, a brief explanation of the steps undertaken to confirm the accuracy of the data should be provided in the Comments column of the ITT.

Formatting

The AE and RRA are responsible for ensuring the Excel ITT matches the ITT formatting guidelines included in this document. In particular, the AE should confirm that all data points (including actuals and metrics of progress) are formatted correctly and the proper rules for shading are applied.

Reporting ITT Data

MCC is committed to transparency about the results of its programs as a means of ensuring accountability and promoting learning in the development community. As one mechanism to fulfill this commitment, monitoring results taken from the ITT are released publicly on a quarterly basis. These results are captured in reports that highlight program-level, agency-wide, and inter-agency initiatives, as well as direct exports from ITTs. While any monitoring data may be reported publicly, the majority of these reports focus on common indicators and performance indicators key to monitoring program process. The remainder of this section (i) summarizes the process to prepare ITT data for reporting and (ii) provides a list of regularly generated reports that use ITT data, and where they can be found publicly.

Preparing ITT data for reporting

After the approval of the QDRP each quarter, the RRA is responsible for updating various standard reports for all active programs. 22 Data for reporting must be taken from the official format of the ITT for that program (generally, the MIS ITT for compacts and Excel ITT for threshold programs and compacts that closed before January 2014). When reporting on current quarter data, the information should be taken from the Actual to Date column. All reports generated from ITT data undergo an internal review process before being finalized and approved. 23  After approval, the reports are made available on MCC’s website. The RRA must also prepare compact ITT data for export by updating the MCC Indicator Tag Editor application. By default, all indicators are tagged as “Approved for Public Release” at the start of each quarterly ITT submission.  Additionally, MCC has a practice of releasing thematic exports (e.g., sex-disaggregated data) that demonstrate MCC’s progress towards various initiatives. To prepare these exports, the RRA should verify that all KPIs, sex-disaggregated data, and other indicator categories are appropriately tagged as such in the app.

Finally, MCC’s default is to release all monitoring data. However, should a concern about data quality or other risks arise that cannot be resolved during the QDRP formal review, the AE and M&E Lead must closely consider appropriate mitigation measures. Requests not to publish data should be rare and will be considered on a case-by-case basis by the Managing Director for M&E.

Whenever possible, the appropriate mitigation measure should be made and relayed to the program’s RRA by the start of the fiscal quarter (e.g. January 1st, April 1st, July 1st, and October 1st), so they may make any necessary updates to standard reports and the Tag Editor.

Summary of ITT reports

Below is a summary of all MCC-produced reports that regularly use monitoring data from the ITT, including the report name, frequency it is updated, description, and location.

Table IV. Standard M&E Reports
Report Name Typical Frequency Summary Where to Find
Table of Key Performance Indicators Compacts: Quarterly Threshold programs: Bi-annually This report presents program-level results. The report includes an overview of each projects’ objectives, as well as a selection of KPIs critical to understanding the status of program implementation. The selection of KPIs is reviewed annually to ensure the most relevant indicators from the program’s M&E Plan are captured given the status of implementation. The most recent Table of KPIs can be found in the M&E section of each program’s page on the MCC website.
Common Indicator Report Compacts: Quarterly Threshold programs: Not applicable This report presents data for common indicators aggregated across all active or closed compacts with activities pertaining to a common sector. Each common sector has its own report. The results by sector are available on the MCC website here: https://www.mcc.gov/our-impact/m-and-e under the section “By Sector.”
Star Report All programs: Made publicly available after program closure. 24 An agency-wide document which captures how and why programs achieve certain results. For each program, systematic evidence is collected on performance indicators, evaluation results, partnerships, sustainability efforts, and learning, among other elements. The Star Reports for select closed programs are available online here: https://www.mcc.gov/resources?fwp_resource_type=star-report
Sector Packages All sectors: Bi-annually For each common sector, a sector package consists of an overview of all programs in the sector, monitoring data for all compacts within the sector, a summary of the evaluation portfolio, and evaluation-specific information. These reports are currently internal but may be made available publicly on request.

Additionally, ITT data are used to report on MCC’s progress towards inter-agency initiatives, such as Feed the Future, Water for the Poor, Power Africa, and the Women’s Global Development and Prosperity Initiative. For these and similar reports, relevant indicators are aggregated across MCC’s programs and reported to the appropriate agency annually. In addition to the reports described above, direct exports of ITT data are made available online in compliance with the International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI). Finally, ITT data are used in a variety of internal reports to report on program performance and are also used by AEs to provide updates on program performance to their Boards of Directors and other stakeholders.

Closeout ITT

The Closeout ITT is the final ITT submitted by the AE and is considered the official source for monitoring results after a program ends. The Closeout ITT provides a quarterly snapshot of progress made and outputs completed for M&E indicators between EIF and program closure. All closeout reports produced by MCC or the AE that report on program outputs specified in the M&E Plan must use the Closeout ITT as the data source. The initial draft is due 70 days after program closure. 25

The Closeout ITT allows the AE to make final updates to the last two quarters of the program ITT (i.e., Q19 and Q20 for compacts; the specific quarter numbers are variable for threshold programs). Progress attained for any indicator after program closure is never included in the Closeout ITT. The specific process for preparing, reviewing, and finalizing the Closeout ITT mirrors the process established for the quarterly ITT. However, since the Closeout ITT is the final opportunity during a program life cycle to update indicator data, additional steps are required of both the AE and CT to document the accuracy of all reported data. In particular:

  • Both the AE and CT must thoroughly review all quarterly data reported during the program lifecycle (i.e., Q1 through the final quarter of the program).
  • The AE must organize and submit final detailed data sources for all indicators. Data sources that have previously been submitted do not need to be resubmitted.
  • Closeout ITT supplemental tables must be prepared for each ITT indicator. These tables document (i) any known data quality concerns; (ii) explanations for indicators that failed to meet or exceeded their targets by more than 10 percent; and (iii) notes to accompany data released externally.

The remainder of this section (i) provides further details on the Closeout ITT required documentation, in particular how to complete the supplemental tables; (ii) presents a recommended timeline for approving the Closeout ITT and required documentation; and (iii) discusses the process for resolving data quality issues during the closure period and post closure.

Closeout ITT Required Documentation

Closeout ITT required documentation, including final primary data sources and supplemental tables, must be prepared and reviewed as part of the Closeout ITT finalization process.

Detailed Data Sources

As discussed in Section V, data sources must be submitted with the ITT on a quarterly basis. However, if for some reason any primary data sources have not previously been submitted as part of a quarterly ITT review, they must be submitted with the Closeout ITT.

Closeout ITT Supplemental Tables

Each ITT indicator must be accompanied by a supplemental table, following the template shown below. These tables provide an assessment of the progress achieved and the perceived quality of each M&E indicator. They are used to inform closeout documentation and also as a reference should any questions related to the indicator arise post program closure. Tables for disaggregations and inputs are not required, except in cases where disaggregations or inputs have targets.

Each supplemental table includes twelve required fields and is populated from a variety of sources, including the M&E Plan, Closeout ITT, and original text drafted by the CT or AE. The tables are developed jointly by the CT and AE in a process managed by the M&E units. The initial draft of the tables may be prepared by either the AE or the MCC; the decision around whether the AE or MCC should lead the process for preparing the supplemental tables should be documented in the program closure plan.

For compacts, the supplemental tables can be generated from MCC MIS, with all fields taken from the M&E Plan and Closeout ITT automatically populated; however, the tables must be populated manually for threshold programs. For ease of reference during the review process, all supplemental tables should be saved in a single file folder, or one folder per program project.

Table V. Closeout ITT Supplemental Tables Template
Indicator Name
Project M&E Plan
Activity M&E Plan
Sub-Activity M&E Plan
Closeout Actual End of Program Target % Complete to Date
Closeout ITT Closeout ITT Closeout ITT
Data quality concern Text drafted by M&E with input from CT Quarters affected M&E
10% over/under target justification Text drafted by CT with input from M&E
Publicly released notes Draft text populated from Closeout ITT and updated by M&E with input from CT Year 5 KPI Yes or No populated by M&E
  • Data quality concern and Quarters affected: These columns document any data quality concerns raised by the AE or CT. The explanation must include the current status of the issue, how the issue has evolved over time, and any measures that have been taken to understand or mitigate the issue. The “Quarters affected” column will list all quarters for which the data quality concern exists (e.g., Q8-Q20). Examples of data quality issues include:
    • Concerns related to the data systems or methodologies used to produce the reported data
    • Misalignment between the data reported and the indicator definition
    • Data source deviating from the source specified in Annex I of the M&E Plan
    • Missing or unverifiable data

Data quality concerns that were raised during the life of the program and completely resolved should not be included.

  • 10% over/under target justification: An explanation must be provided for all indicators that failed to meet their targets by or exceeded their targets by more than 10 percent (i.e., 90% > % Complete > 110%).
  • Publicly released notes: This column includes any notes that should accompany indicator reporting post program closure to improve the interpretability of the reported data. By default, the supplemental tables are populated with the notes include in the comments column of the Closeout. However, the M&E Lead and CT are responsible for reviewing all notes and revising as appropriate for public release. After being finalized, these notes must be added by the RRA to the MCC Indicator Tag Editor for compacts.
  • Year 5 KPI: This column identifies whether an indicator is selected as a KPI at the time of program closeout. KPIs for closed programs are posted publicly on a regular basis in fulfillment of MCC’s commitment to the IATI initiative. Therefore, particular attention should be placed on the publicly released notes for KPIs.

Closeout ITT Review Process

The Closeout ITT review is conducted in a manner similar to the quarterly ITT review. However, while the Closeout ITT and data source documentation must be submitted by the AE M&E Unit, the preparation of the supplemental tables will vary based on whether the CT or AE prepares the initial draft.

The specific timeline for revising and approving the Closeout ITT may be determined by the M&E Lead. However, to ensure all critical questions pertaining to the Closeout ITT are resolved before the AE dissolves, a recommended timeline is included below. Although the Closeout ITT is not submitted with a QDRP, the process is still managed by the CT POC.

Table VI. Closeout ITT Technical Review Process
Step Responsible Parties Due Date
I. Submit draft Closeout ITT and remaining data sources to MCC (If being prepared by AE) Submit Closeout ITT supplemental tables AE M&EAE technical and cross-cutting leads 70 days after Compact or Threshold program end date
II. Review and provide feedback on draft Closeout ITT and accompanying documentation. (If being prepared by MCC) Submit Closeout ITT supplemental tables to AE M&E Lead and RRACountry Team 84 days after program end date (2 weeks after receipt of draft Closeout ITT)
III. Review and respond to feedback on Closeout ITT (If being prepared by AE) Respond to feedback on Closeout ITT supplemental tables (if being prepared by MCC) Review Closeout ITT supplemental tables AE M&EAE technical and cross-cutting leads 98 days after program end date (2 weeks after receiving feedback on draft Closeout ITT)
IV. Finalization and approval of Closeout ITT and required documentation (If being prepared by MCC) Respond to feedback and finalize Closeout ITT supplemental tables M&E Lead and RRACountry TeamDCO and DPE Management (as required) 105 days after program end date(1 week after receiving revised Closeout ITT)

Data Quality Issues

Occasionally, a significant data quality issue may arise during the review of the Closeout ITT that prevents a CT member from clearing on the ITT. Where a data quality issue cannot be resolved solely by discussions amongst the CT, the issue may be elevated to DCO and DPE management. If issues are elevated to management, the following personnel shall be included in all related discussions and emails: M&E Managing Director, Chief Economist, DCO Regional Managing Director, relevant IEPS and/or Sector Operations Practice Lead, and relevant members of the CT. The CT and management may make recommendations for how to resolve the issue; however, the MD for M&E will make the final determination about whether to report on an indicator internally and externally. 26

Updating the Closeout ITT Post Program Closure

Occasionally, after a Closeout ITT has been finalized, information will become available that reveals new information on a known data quality concern or exposes a new data quality issue. In these cases, the members of MCC management identified above must consider whether the Closeout ITT should be modified to account for the new information. If the Closeout ITT is revised, corresponding Closeout ITT supplemental tables, and relevant reports must be updated as well.

If a Closeout ITT is revised, all relevant reports using Closeout ITT data must be updated by the RRA. For each of the following documents, the RRA must review the data reported for the program and update any actuals that were revised in the Closeout ITT: (i) Closeout Table of Key Performance Indicators; (ii) Common Indicator Report; (iii) Star Report (and program webpage); and (iv) Sector Packages. In all reports where an update has been made, a footnote should be added providing a justification and the date of the change.

Any inter-agency or ad hoc reports made using closeout data do not need to be updated unless an additional request for the same report is made after the Closeout ITT is revised. It is only necessary to update the most recent version of all reports – it is not necessary to update reports prepared for previous quarters.

Post Compact ITT

Post Compact M&E Plan

MCC M&E Policy requires that all compacts and threshold programs develop a Post Compact (PC) or post Program M&E Plan, which is drafted by the AE and MCC, with close coordination with a representative designated by the partner government. The PC M&E Plan, which describes ongoing and future M&E activities in the partner country, must be approved within 90 days of program closure. All PC monitoring indicators are identified in an abbreviated version of Annexes I and II to the PC M&E Plan. More information on PC M&E Plans can be found in the Post Compact M&E Plan Guidance.

In accordance with the approved PC M&E Plan, the designated representative shall submit an Annual Summary Report (ASR), including a Post Compact ITT (PC ITT), 27 which allows the partner government to inform MCC of continued progress related to MCC programs, and sectoral or institutional reforms. Typically, MCC requires submission of the ASR for five years post compact, but the time period and frequency should align with the evaluation planning or other considerations for individual programs. In particular, for many programs, more frequent (i.e., quarterly or semi-annual) reporting may be required for the first year or more after the program closes while works funded by other parties may still be ongoing.

Post Compact ITT Format

The PC ITT template is created by the program’s RRA using Annexes I and II of the PC M&E Plan. All indicator information from the Closeout ITT (including all program actuals, baselines, targets, and metrics of progress) are included for informational purposes. 28  These data are restricted and can only be updated after a revision of the Closeout ITT, following the process described in the section above. Any program indicators that are not included in the PC M&E Plan for reporting post compact are excluded from the PC ITT.

The PC ITT adds one column for each additional reporting period agreed to in the PC M&E Plan; as mentioned above, this is typically five (one per year) but may be more frequent and should be determined based on the post program evaluation timeline or other relevant considerations. Post compact targets are not required unless already documented in the program M&E Plan before closure; columns for post compact targets and progress to date are included when post program targets exist or teams would like to compare post program actuals to end of program targets. All PC ITTs are submitted in the Excel format, following the formatting guidelines describe in Annex VII.

Figure XIII. Post Compact ITT Format

Post Compact ITT Reporting Requirements

Six weeks before the ASR is due, the RRA will prepare and MCC must submit the PC ITT template to the designated representative. The designated representative then prepares and submits the PC ITT with supporting source documentation and the ASR, according to the schedule and process outlined in the PC M&E Plan. As with program ITTs, data can be reported in the current and previous reporting periods. All post program historical data are restricted but may be unlocked by the RRA, if requested by the designated representative and an appropriate justification is provided.

After receiving the PC ITT, the RRA will review the document for formatting and data entry errors and verify the actuals against the submitted source documentation. After which, M&E will circulate the PC ITT with remaining members of the CT, as well as the Regional MD and relevant PLSDs. Feedback from reviewers on the PC ITT is welcome. However, due to the limited engagement expected of post compact designated representatives, detailed responses or extensive revisions may not be provided in response. Considering the limited engagement and limited ability to verify the accuracy of the reported data, the PC ITT is filed internally but not distributed publicly.

Annex I: Glossary

Those terms marked with an asterisk are taken from the MCC M&E Policy

* Accountable Entity — The entity designated by the government of the country receiving assistance from MCC to oversee and manage implementation of the Compact or Threshold Program on behalf of the government. The Accountable Entity is often referred to as the MCA.

* Activity — Actions taken or work performed through which inputs, such as funds, technical assistance and other types of resources are mobilized to produce specific outputs. Typically, multiple Activities make up one Project and work together to meet the Project’s Objective.

* Actual — A data point that shows what has been completed, as opposed to a number that is a target or a prediction.

* Baseline — The situation prior to a development intervention, against which progress can be assessed or comparisons made.

* Closeout — Refers to anything deemed final as of the end of the Compact.

Closeout ITT — The final ITT of a Compact or Threshold Program that includes all data as of the program end date.

* Common Indicator — An indicator that MCC uses to aggregate results across countries within certain sectors and report internally and externally to key stakeholders.

* Compact — The agreement known as Millennium Challenge Compact, entered into between the United States of America, acting through the Millennium Challenge Corporation, and the government of the country receiving assistance pursuant to which MCC provides such assistance to the country.

* Closure Date — With respect to a Compact, the last day of the Compact’s Closure Period, which is exactly 120 days after the CED.

* Closure Period — The 120-day period after the CED, during which the MCA closes out all remaining contracts and transfers any remaining assets.

* Cumulative — An indicator classification. These indicators report a running total, so that each reported actual includes the previously reported actual and adds any progress made since the last reporting period.

Cumulative total — The total progress achieved for a cumulative or level (cumulative) indicator, including all progress accomplished during the current quarter. The total progress achieved spans either the entire program for cumulative indicators or the current program year for level (cumulative) indicators.

* Date Indicator — An indicator that records the occurrence of a one-time event.

Disaggregation — Indicators in an indicator family used to report on a distinct subset of a main indicator.

Draft ITT — An ITT being reviewed as part of an ITT submission cycle. An ITT is considered draft between the time the AE begins preparing the submission until the ITT is formally approved as part of the QDRP.

* Entry into Force — The point in time when a Compact or Threshold Program Agreement comes into full legal force and effect and its term begins.

* Goal Indicator — Indicators that measure the economic growth and poverty reduction changes that occur during or after implementation of the Program.

Historical data — All data that are recorded in quarters earlier than the program’s most recent previous quarter.

Incremental actual — The total progress accomplished during the current quarter for a cumulative or level (cumulative) indicator.

* Indicator — Quantitative or qualitative variable that provides a simple and reliable means to measure achievement of a development intervention.

Indicator family — A collection of indicators grouped together to report on the same piece of information. Each indicator family is comprised of a minimum of one indicator, plus any associated disaggregations or inputs.

Indicator information —Information taken from the M&E Plan to populate the ITT, including the indicator name, level, unit of measure, classification, baseline, yearly targets, and end of program target.

* Indicator Inputs —These indicators are the components of a composite indicator, such as a percentage or ratio. In most cases, they will be the numerator and denominator used to calculate the indicator.

* Indicator Tracking Table — A quarterly reporting tool that tracks progress on the indicators included in a country’s M&E Plan towards program targets. It is part of the Quarterly Disbursement Request and Reporting Package.

Irregular data — Reporting on an indicator that does not adhere to reasonable expectations for indicator progress.

ITT template — An updated version of the Excel format of the ITT prepared by the RRA at the start of each ITT submission cycle.

ITT Progress Report – An optional supplement to the ITT, which includes additional information to help interpret and contextualize ITT reporting and to provide M&E staff with a forum to report the findings of monitoring efforts outside of the ITT.

* Key Performance Indicator — An indicator selected from the M&E Plan that is reported quarterly in the Table of Key Performance Indicators.

* Level — An indicator classification. These indicators track trends over time, and may fluctuate up and down between quarters.

Level (Average) — An indicator classification. A type of level indicator in which progress is assessed by comparing the yearly target to an average of all actuals recorded during the program year.

Level (Cumulative) — An indicator classification. These indicators track the cumulative value for each program year. At the beginning of a new program year, the cumulative total begins again at zero.

* M&E Plan — Tool for outlining a country’s approach to monitoring, evaluating, and assessing progress towards Compact objectives.

* MCC Management Information System — A system designed to collect and process data to assist in the management of programs. The MCC MIS serves as a single data repository and reporting tool for auditable fiscal, procurement, and indicator performance data.

Metric of Progress — A calculation that assesses indicator progress against a yearly or end of program target.

* Monitoring — A continuous function that uses the systematic collection of data on specified indicators to gauge progress toward final program objectives and achievement of intermediate results along the way.

* Outcome Indicator — An indicator that measure the intermediate effects of an Activity or set of Activities and are directly related to the Output Indicators.

* Output Indicator — An indicator that directly measure Project Activities. They describe and quantify the goods and services produced directly by the implementation of an Activity.

Percent deviation — A calculation that assesses an indicator’s progress by measuring the absolute difference between an indicator and its yearly or end of program target.

Post closure – The period of time after Compact or Threshold Program end date.  

* Post Compact M&E Plan — Describes post-compact monitoring and evaluation activities, identifies the individuals and organizations that would undertake these activities, provides a budget framework for future monitoring and evaluation which draws upon both MCC and country resources, and document the role the partner country will play in results dissemination.

Post Compact ITT A version of the ITT that is derived from the Post Compact M&E Plan and due after program closure; the Post Compact ITT is part of the Annual Summary Report that tracks continued progress related to MCC programs, and sectoral or institutional reforms.

* Process Indicator — An indicator that measures progress toward the completion of a Project Activity, a step toward the achievement of Project Outputs and a way to ensure the work plan is proceeding on time.

* Program — A group of Projects implemented together to achieve a goal.

* Program Closure Plan — The plan developed by an Accountable Entity describing the closure strategy for each Project and Activity of a Compact, the winding-up or continuing of the Accountable Entity, financial plan for the closure period, post-compact M&E plan, and other important aspects as appropriate in order to close-out the Compact.

* Program Logic — An explanatory model that demonstrates how a Program’s Activities lead to the expected outcomes, objectives, and goal of a Compact, presented graphically.

* Project — A group of Activities implemented together to achieve an objective.

Quarterly Disbursement Request Package — A reporting package that provides information on execution of program activities; financial management; procurement, grant, and partnership actions; progress towards compact or threshold program goals (as defined by monitoring and evaluation (M&E) indicators and targets); and the status of conditions precedent (CP) to disbursement. The package also details projected commitments and disbursements for the life of the grant.

* Table of Key Performance Indicators — A public document that reports on a sub-set of the indicators reported on in the Indicator Tracking Table. The indicators are selected yearly by the country teams to best reflect the current state of the Compact.

* Target — The expected result for a particular indicator to be met by the end of the compact.

* Threshold Program — A program authorized by Section 616 of the Millennium Challenge Act of 2003, as amended, pursuant to which MCC provides assistance to a qualifying country for the purpose of assisting such country to become eligible for a Compact.

Unspecified disaggregation – A disaggregation used in MCC MIS to record the difference between a main indicator and the value(s) available for all defined disaggregations.

Annex II. Indicator Tracking Table – Frequently Asked Questions

What is the Indicator Tracking Table and how does it fit in the MCC M&E system?

The Indicator Tracking Table (ITT) is a quarterly reporting tool that serves as the primary mechanism to operationalize a compact or threshold program’s commitment to monitoring. The ITT tracks the progress of indicators included in the program’s M&E Plan towards program targets and is submitted as part of a Compact Quarterly Disbursement Request Package (QDRP). Data reported in the ITT are used to inform project implementation decisions, and for internal and external reporting (ITT Guidance, page 4).

How is the ITT developed?

The Indicator Tracking Table is derived from a program’s M&E Plan. All programs must have an M&E Plan approved by MCC and the Accountable Entity (AE) Board, which provides a detailed framework for monitoring and evaluating the program. As part of this framework, the M&E Plan must include a summary of the program’s monitoring strategy, including detailed indicator information for monitoring and evaluation indicators, such as definitions, baselines and targets. All monitoring indicators, as well as their detailed indicator information, baselines, and targets, must be documented in Annexes I and II of the M&E Plan. The ITT is created based on the information provided in these Annexes. All indicator information taken from the M&E Plan must match the M&E Plan exactly and cannot be updated in the ITT without formally revising the M&E Plan prior. (ITT Guidance, pages 5). For more information on the M&E Plan, please see the MCC and the forthcoming Monitoring and Evaluation Plan Guidance.

How does the ITT fit into MCC’s Quarterly Disbursement Request Processes?

The ITT is officially submitted by the AE to MCC as part of the Quarterly Disbursement Request Package. The ITT shares information related to program progress. Once the QDRP is submitted, the ITT is reviewed by M&E and members of the CT. Clearance of the QDRP by CT members includes clearance of the ITT and approval of ITT data for reporting. If there are persistent and unaddressed data issues in the ITT, the QDRP may ultimately be rejected and spending authority denied (ITT Guidance, page 28).

How is the ITT data verified?

The submission cycle is comprised of four phases, containing several steps each: (I) preparing the draft ITT; (II) M&E review and historical updates; (III) (optional) country team technical review; and (IV) formal Review and approval. During the M&E review, the RRA is responsible for verifying all actuals against the source documentation provided by the AE, ensuring that calculations are correct, that data are entered consistently with the indicator information, and that the formatting is correct. The M&E Lead is responsible for a comprehensive review of the data, including confirming that the data align with implementation timelines and the Comments column sufficiently explains any delays or irregular data. If necessary, the M&E Lead may confirm actuals or comments with members of the CT during this period (ITT Guidance, pages 35-36).

How is ITT data used?

MCC is committed to transparency about the results of its programs as a means of ensuring accountability for itself and promoting learning in the development community. As one mechanism to fulfill this commitment, monitoring results taken from the ITT are released publicly on a quarterly basis. These results are captured in reports that highlight program-level, agency-wide, and inter-agency initiatives, as well as direct exports from ITTs. While any monitoring data may be reported publicly, the majority of these reports focus on common indicators and performance indicators key to monitoring program process (ITT Guidance, page 37).

Is historical data ever updated?

By default, all historical actuals are locked in both the Excel and MCC MIS formats. However, occasionally, updates to historical data may be required if new data become available or if a previously unknown issue emerges. In these cases, the AE may request that historical data be made available for updates. To do so, the AE must send a Historical Actual Change Request (HACR) via email (for Excel ITTs) or MCC MIS (for MCC MIS ITTs) (ITT Guidance, page 32).

What is the official record for ITT data?

The ITT is displayed in one of two formats, referred to as the “Excel ITT” and the “MCC MIS ITT.” All compacts are required to submit an MCC MIS ITT as part of the standard QDRP process. At this time, MCC MIS is not available for threshold programs, and all threshold ITTs must be submitted in the Excel format. If required by MCC, compacts may also report an Excel version of the ITT. The Excel ITT can be used to facilitate review by the AEs and during country team (CT) technical review. If an Excel ITT is required, the finalized version should be uploaded as part of the MCC MIS QDRP under “Other Documents” (ITT Guidance, page 6).

Annex III. Frequently Used Disaggregations

Disaggregation Type Frequently Used Disaggregations
Relevant Sector: All
Age Under 5; 5 and over; 18 and under; Over 18; 15 to 35; Over 35
Labor source Foreign; Local; National
Sex Female; Male
Relevant Sector: All utilities (Power; Water) etc.
Customer class Commercial; Residential; Industrial; Government; Other
Firm size Micro; Small; Medium; Large
Relevant Sector: Education
Education level Primary; Secondary; Post-secondary
Relevant Sector: Agriculture and Land
Household head Female-headed household; Male-headed household; Co-headed household; Community-owned; Other
Land registration First time registration; Transfers
Land zones Rural; Urban
Relevant Sector: Power
Electricity supply source Domestic; Imports
Plant ownership Government-owned; Independent Power Producer
Power generation source On-grid; Off-grid
Power source type Renewable; Thermal
Renewable energy type Hydro; Biogas; Biomass; Solar; PV; Thermal
Voltage level 400 kV; 132 kV; 66 kV; 33 kV; 11 kV; 0.4 kV
Relevant Sector: Transportation
Road class Primary; Secondary; Tertiary; Feeder roads
Road user Bicyclist; Driver; Pedestrian; Vehicle passenger
Relevant Sector: Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene
Connection type Water only; Water and wastewater
Installation type New; Replacement
Treatment facility type Water; Wastewater
Water source type Surface water; Groundwater; Desalination; Reclaimed water; Other
Water system Network; Non-Network

Note: The relevant sector categorizations provide guidance as to the most frequently used disaggregation types in each sector. However, any disaggregation type may be used for any type of project for which the disaggregations are appropriate.

 

 Annex IV. Indicator Family Calculation Types

Indicator Family Calculation Types Calculation Formula
Disaggregations
Sum disaggregation 1 + disaggregation 2 + … + disaggregation n
Info disaggregation 0 + disaggregation 0 + … + disaggregation 0
Indicator Inputs
Average (input 1 + input 2 … + input n)/n
Difference input 1 – input 2 – … – input n
Percentage (input 1/input 2)*100
Ratio input 1/input 2

Annex V: Standard List of Indicator Units

This annex provides a list of all units available to be used in M&E Plans and the ITT. Any additions to this list must be approved by MCC M&E Management.

Units of Metric Approved Units
Units of Currency (applicable countries in parentheses) US Dollars; Ariary (MDG); Birr (ETH); Cedi (GHA); CFA Francs (BEN, BFA, CIV, MLI, NER, SEN); Córdoba (NIC); Dalasi (GMB); Dinar (JOR, TUN); Dirham (MAR); Drams (ARM); Escudos (CPV); Euro (XKX); Kwacha (MWI, ZMB); Lari (GEO); Lempira (HND); Leu (MDA); Liberian Dollar (LBR); Maloti (LSO); Meticais (MOZ); Namibian Dollar (NAM); Peso (PHL); Quetzal (GTM); Rupee (LKA, NPL); Rupiah (IDN); Solomon Islands dollar (SLB); Tanzanian Shillings (TZA); Tugrik (MNG); Vatu (VUT)
Units of Distance and Area Hectares; Kilometers; Square Meters
Units of Apparent Power Megavolt ampere
Units of Electric Power Megawatts
Units of Energy Kilowatt hours; Megawatt hours
Units of Time Date, Days, Hours, Hours per day, Minutes
Units of Volume and Density Cubic meters; Cubic meters per day; Cubic meters per month; Liters; Liters per capita per day; Mega liters
Units of Weight and Mass Kilograms; Metric tons; Tons
Base Units and Miscellaneous Indices Meters per kilometer; Number; Percentage; Percentage Point; Rate; Ratio

Annex VI: Metrics of Progress Detailed Definitions

MCC assesses indicator progress in the yearly percent complete and “Percent Complete to Date” columns of the ITT using one of two possible metrics of progress: Percent Complete and Date. Additionally, a third metric of progress, Percent Deviation, may be added to the Comments column of the ITT when helpful to do so.

This table provides the formulas used to populate these columns of the ITT. The specific formula used varies based on the metric of progress, and baseline and target values of each indicator.

Metric of Progress Scenario Metric of Progress Formula Notes
Baseline Target Yearly Percent Complete 29 Percent Complete to Date
Percent Complete Any non-zero number 30 Any non-zero number = (Actual − Baseline) ÷ (Target − Baseline) = (Actual to Date − Baseline) ÷ (Target − Baseline) Level (Cumulative) indicators: The “Actual to Date” and “Percent Complete to Date” columns are updated annually, in the final quarter of Compact Year. Level (Average) indicators: The “Yearly Percent Complete” formulas should use the “Actual to Date” in the numerator.
None or 0 or TBD Any non-zero number = Actual ÷ Target = Actual to Date ÷ Target
Any number None or TBD Leave cell blank or shade if compact year is completed (i.e. no calculation needed)
Baseline = Target Leave cell blank or shade if compact year is completed (i.e. no calculation needed) M&E recommends against setting a target to equal zero or the baseline. However, in some older programs these scenarios may occur.
Any number Zero
Date Indicator N/A DD-MMM-YY Pending if no actual recorded Complete if actual recorded Date indicators do not have baselines. Once an actual has been recorded, the Percent Complete will read “Complete” in the year of completion and all ensuing years.
None
(Optional) Percent Deviation N/A Any non-zero number | Actual – Target | / Target If used, the Percent deviation calculation should be reported in the “Comments” column. It should not replace the calculation of the Percent Complete calculation in the percent complete columns.
N/A None or 0 or TBD Leave cell blank or shade if compact year is completed (i.e. no calculation needed)

Annex VII. Formatting Guidelines for Excel ITTs

Relevant Column Formatting Instructions Responsible Party
Entire file
  • The draft ITT template and Final ITT should be saved using the following nomenclature:
    • ITT – 3 letter country code – QXX Draft
    • ITT – 3 letter country code – QXX – Final
  • Both Draft and Final ITT should be saved in the appropriate sub-folder.
RRA
  • All data should be centered (vertically and horizontally) in the cells EXCEPT Indicator Name, Detailed Data Source, and Comments.
    • These three columns will be right justified, with the exception of indicator children, which is discussed further below.
RRA
  • All cells should be formatted as Number, Percentage, or Text (as relevant).
  • Cells should not be formatted as Custom or Accounting.
RRA
  • By default, each project is separated on its own Excel sheet.
  • Individual activities may be given their own sheet, if necessary, given the number of indicators
RRA
  • If considered useful by the AE and MCC, additional columns may be added.
  • Recommended columns can include: Indicator code, Frequency of Reporting, or Definition
RRA
  • All text should be written in English and typo-free
AE
Common Indicator
  • If the indicator is a Common Indicator (CI) or CI disaggregation, the CI code must be entered in the cell
    • E.g. E-1 or E-2.1
RRA
  • If the indicator is not a CI or CI disaggregation, the cell should be left blank and unshaded
RRA
Indicator Level
  • Capitalize first letter of level
    • E.g. Output, not output
RRA
Indicator Name
  • Capitalize all first letters and proper nouns
  • No other words should be capitalized
    • E.g. Policy reforms adopted, not Policy reforms Adopted)
RRA
  • The first letter of all disaggregations should also be capitalized
    • E.g. Stakeholders trained (Female), not Stakeholders trained (female)
RRA
  • Visibly indent children and grandchildren. Grandchildren should be indented twice as far as children
RRA
Indicator Classification
  • Capitalize first letter of classification and first letter in parentheses
    • E.g. Level (Cumulative), not level (cumulative)
RRA
Unit of Measure
  • Capitalize first letter of unit
  • If unit is multiple words, do not capitalize remaining words
    • E.g. Meters per kilometer, not Meters per Kilometer
RRA
Baseline
  • Display the number of decimals specified in the M&E Plan
RRA
  • Baseline years should not be reported in these cells. If requested, baseline year can be added as an additional column
RRA
  • For Date indicators and indicators without a baseline, the baseline should be shaded using the grid shading
    • Grid shading
RRA
Quarterly Data
  • Format data to two decimal places.
  • The hundredths place should be rounded and additional decimals removed from the ITT
    • E.g. 1,856.45, not 1,856.5
AE
  • Format data to include thousand separators.
    • E.g. 1,856.45, not 1856.45
    • Separators should be added through the “Format Cells” window and not through manual entry
AE
  • Cells should not contain any non-numerical characters
    • E.g. 95.46, not 0.9546 or 95.46%
AE
  • Any historical (i.e. non-editable) quarter with no data entered is shaded using the grid shading
AE
Yearly Targets
  • Format targets to the number of decimal places specified in the M&E Plan
RRA
  • Format targets to include thousand separators
RRA
  • Targets should not contain any non-numerical characters
RRA
  • Targets can be a number, TBD, or blank (n/a). If target is blank, the cell is shaded using the grid shading
RRA
% Complete
  • Format % Complete calculations as Percentages and using the % symbol
  • (e.g. 95% not 95)
AE
  • % Complete calculations should never contain decimals
  • (e.g. 95% not 95.21%)
AE
  • If using formulas to calculate % Complete, the formula should reference the most recent relevant quarter, even if data did not change between quarters
AE
  • If no data has been entered for a completed Compact Year and there is no target, the % complete cell is shaded.
  • If no data has been entered, but there is a target, the % Complete is calculated.
AE
  • If Target is TBD, the % Complete cell is unshaded for the current and all future compact years.
  • The % Complete cell is shaded for all previous compact years
AE
  • If there is no target, the % Complete cell is shaded for all compact years
AE
Actual to Date
  • Format data according to the same rules for quarterly data
AE
  • If the indicator is Level (Cumulative), only update this column at the end of each Compact Year
AE
  • If using formulas to calculate Actual to Date, the formula should reference the most recent relevant quarter(s), even if data did not change between quarters
AE
End of Compact Target
  • Format data according to the same rules for Yearly Targets
RRA
  • If there is no target, the target should be shaded using grid shading
RRA
Percent Complete to Date
  • Format data according to the same rules for Yearly % Complete
AE
  • If no data, no target, or target is TBD, Percent Complete to Date should be unshaded
AE
Detailed Data Source
  • Text should follow standard formatting rules and text should be wrapped
AE
Comments
  • Text should follow standard formatting rules and text should be wrapped
AE

Annex VIII. ITT Submission Cycle Diagram and Timeline

Annex VIII A. ITT Submission Cycle Diagram

Annex VIII B. Timeline for AEs submitting ITTs exclusively in MCC MIS

Step Action Date (for QDRP XX) 31 ]
1 RRA emails the AE to begin submitting ITT data in MCC MIS 6 weeks before the QDRP
2 AE M&E unit completes a draft version of the MCC MIS ITT. 6 weeks – 5 weeks before the QDRP
3 AE M&E unit completes an internal review of the draft MCC MIS ITT. 5 weeks – 4 weeks before the QDRP
4 Draft MCC MIS ITT internally approved by AE. 4 weeks before the QDRP
5 AE M&E unit send an email notification to the RRA that the draft ITT has been submitted. Also by email, the AE M&E unit sends all source documents and justifications for HACRs. 4 weeks before the QDRP
6 RRA and M&E Lead(s) review the draft ITT in MCC MIS and the source documents and justifications for HACR received by email. 4 weeks – 3 weeks before the QDRP
7 RRA sends comments and requests for clarification to the AE M&E unit. If justifications for HACRs were submitted, the RRA sends approval or denial of these requests. 3 weeks before the QDRP
8 AE M&E unit updates the draft ITT. If the justifications have been approved, AE M&E unit prepares and submits HACR. M&E Lead approves HACR. 3 weeks – 2 weeks before the QDRP
9 (Optional) AE M&E unit submits the draft ITT as part of the QDRP technical review. 2 weeks before the QDRP
10 (Optional) MCC CT completes technical review of the QDRP, including the draft ITT. 2 weeks – 1 week before the QDRP
11 AE M&E unit updates the draft ITT based on feedback received by the CT 5 days – 3 days before the QDRP
12 RRA completes final review of the draft ITT in MCC MIS 2 days before the QDRP
13 MCC CT completes formal Review of the QDRP, including the ITT After the submission of the QDRP

Annex VIII C. Timeline for AEs submitting ITTs in Excel and MCC MIS

Step Action Date (for QDRP XX)
1 RRA sends the Excel ITT template to the AE by email 6 weeks before the QDRP
2 AE M&E unit completes a draft version of the Excel ITT. 6 weeks – 5 weeks before the QDRP
3 AE M&E unit completes an internal review of the draft Excel ITT. 5 weeks – 4 weeks before the QDRP
4 Draft Excel ITT internally approved by AE. 4 weeks before the QDRP
5 AE M&E unit sends the draft ITT by email. Also by email, the AE M&E team sends all source documents and justifications for HACRs. 4 weeks before the QDRP
6 RRA and M&E Lead(s) review the draft ITT in Excel and the source documents and justifications for HACR received by email. 4 weeks – 3 weeks before the QDRP
7 RRA sends comments and requests for clarification to the AE M&E unit. If justifications for HACRs were submitted, the RRA sends approval or denial of these requests. If requests are approved, the applicable cells will be unlocked in the Excel ITT. 3 weeks before the QDRP
8 AE M&E unit updates the draft ITT. If the HACR justifications have been approved, AE M&E unit updates historical data. 3 weeks – 2 weeks before the QDRP
9 (Optional) AE M&E unit submits the draft ITT as part of the QDRP technical review. 2 weeks before the QDRP
10 (Optional) MCC CT completes technical review of the QDRP, including the draft ITT. 2 weeks – 1 week before the QDRP
11 AE M&E team updates the draft ITT based on feedback received by the CT. AE M&E team enters the actuals in MCC MIS.  The Excel ITT is attached to the QDRP. 5 days – 3 days before the QDRP
12 RRA completes final review of ITT data in MCC MIS. 2 days before the QDRP
13 MCC CT completes formal Review of the QDRP, including the MCC MIS ITT. After the submission of the QDRP

Annex VIII D. Timeline for AEs submitting ITTs exclusively in Excel

Step Action Date (for QDRP XX)
1 RRA sends the Excel ITT template to the AE by email 6 weeks before the QDRP
2 AE M&E unit completes a draft version of the Excel ITT. 6 weeks – 5 weeks before the QDRP
3 AE M&E unit completes an internal review of the draft Excel ITT. 5 weeks – 4 weeks before the QDRP
4 Draft Excel ITT internally approved by AE. 4 weeks before the QDRP
5 AE M&E unit sends the draft ITT by email. Also by email, the AE M&E unit sends all source documents and justifications for HACRs. 4 weeks before the QDRP
6 RRA and M&E Lead(s) review the draft ITT in Excel and the source documents and justifications for HACR received by email. 4 weeks – 3 weeks before the QDRP
7 RRA sends comments and requests for clarification to the AE M&E unit. If justifications for HACRs were submitted, the RRA sends approval or denial of these requests. If requests are approved, the applicable cells will be unlocked in the Excel ITT. 3 weeks before the QDRP
8 AE M&E unit updates the draft ITT. If the HACR justifications have been approved, AE M&E unit updates historical data. 3 weeks – 2 weeks before the QDRP
9 (Optional) AE M&E unit submits the draft ITT as part of the QDRP technical review. 2 weeks before the QDRP
10 (Optional) MCC CT completes technical review of the QDRP, including the draft ITT. 2 weeks – 1 week before the QDRP
11 AE M&E unit updates the draft ITT based on feedback received by the CT. 5 days – 3 days before the QDRP
12 RRA completes final review of Excel ITT data and marks the Excel ITT as final. 2 days before the QDRP
13 MCC CT completes formal Review of the QDRP, including the Excel ITT. After the submission of the QDRP

Annex IX. Sample Process Map for AE ITT Review

This diagram presents a sample process by which AE M&E Unit may prepare the quarterly ITT. The diagram can and should be adapted to the specific program context.

*DQ refers to data quality

Annex X. ITT Review Checklists

AE Internal Review Checklist
Data Entry
Do all of the actuals entered in the ITT match the source documentation?
Are data entered in the quarter in which the data were measured, rather than the quarter in which the data were obtained?
Are data entered accurately according to the indicator classification? Are cumulative totals entered in the Excel format and incremental actuals entered in the MCC MIS format?
Are data entered according to the additional indicator criteria, including the unit and frequency of reporting?
Do all zeros represent measured values? Are zeros entered for an indicator before non-zero values are available?
Have you recorded the data source information in the Detailed Data Source column?
Have you organized all data sources and prepared to send the documentation to MCC?
(For Excel format) Does the sum of disaggregations for an indicator equal the value reported for the main indicator?
(For Excel format) Are the program percent complete columns calculated correctly? Do the formulas pull from the most recent applicable quarter?
(For Excel format) Does the Actual to Date column include the most recent actual for each indicator? Is the Actual to Date populated correctly for level (average) and level (cumulative) indicators?
Irregular Data
Are there unexplained fluctuations in reported data?
Have you carefully reviewed data sources across quarters to confirm there is no double counting in reported data?
Does the reported data align with project implementation? For example, if a training program has started, has training data been reported? Alternatively, is training data reported before the training has started?
Have the reported data significantly exceeded or fall far short of yearly targets?
Does the data source report data in a manner consistent with the indicator definition?
Have you added contextual notes in the Comments column where understanding an actual requires additional information?
Formatting
Have all data been entered to two decimal places?
Are all notes written in English and free of typos?
(For Excel) Are actuals centered in their cells and formatted with comma thousands separators and without special characters?
(For Excel) Are all current quarter and historical cells shaded that do not contain data if data is not expected or left blank if data is expected but unavailable?
Have all other formatting guidelines been followed?
Please add additional questions as needed to facilitate review of your program’s ITT
RRA Quality Review Checklist
Data Entry
Have you verified that all actuals entered in the ITT match the source documentation and data are entered in the quarter in which the data were measured?
Have data been entered accurately according to the indicator classification? Have cumulative totals been entered in the Excel format and incremental actuals entered in the MCC MIS format?
Have data been entered according to the additional indicator criteria, including the unit and frequency of reporting?
Are zero values only entered when required?
Has the Actual to Date column been correctly populated according to the indicator classification and most recent data available?
Have you confirmed that all source documentation has been received?
Have you saved data sources according to the agreed upon repository framework?
(For Excel format) Does the sum of disaggregations for an indicator equal the value reported for the main indicator?
(For Excel format) Are the Actual to Date and yearly and program percent complete columns calculated correctly? Do the formulas pull from the most recent applicable quarter?
Irregular Data
Are there any unexplained fluctuations in reported data? Has a comment been added explaining the fluctuation? If so, is the explanation clear?
Have the reported data significantly exceeded or fall far short of yearly targets? If so, has an explanation been provided? Is the explanation clear?
Formatting
Have all data been entered to two decimal places?
Are all notes written in English and free of typos?
(For Excel) Are actuals centered in their cells and formatted with comma thousands separators and without special characters?
(For Excel) Are all current quarter and historical cells shaded that do not contain data if data is not expected or left blank if data is expected but unavailable?
Have all other formatting guidelines been followed?
Please add additional questions as needed to facilitate review of your program’s ITT
M&E Lead Quality Review Check List
Irregular Data
Are data entered in the quarter in which the data were measured, rather than the quarter in which the data were obtained?
Are there any unexplained fluctuations in reported data? Has a comment been added explaining the fluctuation? If so, is the explanation clear and accurate?
Are there any signs of double counting within the data? For example, do indicators counting participants include unexpected increases?
Do the reported data align with project implementation? For example, if a training program has started, has training data been reported? Alternatively, is training data reported before the training has started?
Do the data reported for different indicators make sense in relationship with each other? For example, if two indicators are expected to be reported on simultaneously, does this take place?
Have the reported data significantly exceeded or fall far short of yearly targets? If so, has an explanation been provided? Is the explanation clear and accurate?
Have you confirmed that data are reported in a manner consistent with the indicator definition and additional information?
If any contextual notes have been added, are they clear and accurate? Are there any data points that require a contextual note, which is missing?
If necessary, have you identified any targeted questions for technical leads and other members of the CT?
Have you confirmed with the RRA whether there are any outstanding issues from the RRA review that need to be addressed and discussed?
Do the trends in the data make sense?Should this indicator contain data because this aspect of the project/activity has already started to occur?
Country Team Quality Review Checklist
Have you reviewed all of the indicators in the ITT that fall within the Projects, Activities, and/or Sub-Activities for which you have been assigned responsibility?
Does the data being reported during the current and previous two quarters match your understanding of the work that was accomplished during those quarters? (For example, when the Q4 ITT is submitted, review all data for Q2-Q4 of ITT.)
Have you responded to any additional questions the M&E Lead has flagged to you?
Are you aware of progress on any indicator which is not currently captured in the ITT? In other words, is there data missing from the ITT that should be reported?
In cases where the indicators have not met their targets, are the justifications clear and do they align with your understanding of the delay?
Is general progress towards/achievement of targets in line with your expectations? If not, are there any corrective measures required to get the project back on track?
Have you communicated your feedback to the M&E Lead to be addressed by the AE?
Footnotes
  • 1. For more information on MCC’s Monitoring and Evaluation Policy, please see https://www.mcc.gov/resources/doc-pdf/policy-for-monitoring-and-evaluation. Additionally, please refer to Annex I of this guidance for a glossary of defined terms.
  • 2. Unless otherwise specified, references to “compact” or “program” throughout this document should be applied equally to compact and threshold programs. Where practice differs between ITTs for compacts and thresholds, the distinction will be clearly made.
  • 3. ITTs are not required for QDRPs for Compact Development Funds or Compact Facilitation Funds.
  • 4. Detailed information on a program’s monitoring strategy can be found in the program’s M&E Plan. With some contextual variations permissible, the monitoring strategy is generally consistent across all MCC programs.
  • 5. Monitoring indicators can, however, be used by a program’s independent evaluators to help inform an evaluation.
  • 6. The following detailed indicator information is required for each monitoring indicator in the M&E Plan: common indicator code, results statement, indicator level, indicator name, unit of measure, (optional) disaggregations, primary data source, responsible party, frequency of reporting, (optional) additional information, classification, baseline, yearly targets, and end of compact target. A subset of this information is also included in the ITT.
  • 7. The MCC MIS serves as a single data repository and reporting tool for auditable fiscal, procurement, and indicator performance data. All compact countries are required to submit their QDRPs, including the ITT, through MCC MIS.
  • 8. In the MCC MIS format, the following fields cannot be added as new columns, but are automatically available for all indicators by selecting the indicator name in the ITT grid: definition; additional information; results statement; and frequency of reporting.
  • 9. This guidance is not intended to guide development of Annexes I and II of the M&E Plan. However, in some instances, detailed information on specific columns of the Annexes is provided to clarify ITT reporting requirements.
  • 10. For more information about Common Indicators, please refer to MCC’s Guidance on Common Indicators: https://www.mcc.gov/resources/doc/guidance-on-common-indicators. Currently the following sectors have common indicators: (i) Agriculture and Irrigation; (ii) Land; (iii) Roads; (iv) Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene; (v) Education; and (vi) Power.
  • 11. Date indicators should be assigned the baseline “not applicable.” Additionally, in rare situations, an indicator may not have a clearly measurable baseline. For example, data for the indicator “Completion rate among students of Compact-constructed schools” does not exist before the schools are completed and therefore, no baseline can be provided. To the extent possible, monitoring indicators should be defined in such a way that a baseline can be established.
  • 12. For more information on the ITT Progress Report and its potential uses, please refer to the ITT Progress Report Guidance.
  • 13. For Level (average) indicators, the denominator (n) of the average calculation is equal to the quarter of the compact year the program is in. For example, assuming that data are reported quarterly as planned, if the program is in quarter 2, 6, 10, 14, or 18, the denominator equals 2.
  • 14. If the AE and MCC opt to include the percent deviation calculation in any report, please ensure the indicator name and additional information are sufficiently clear so an end user can correctly interpret the calculation. This calculation, while it can be useful, is more complex than the standard percent complete formula and may cause confusion unless properly clarified.
  • 15. If the current quarter takes place in a different compact year from the previous quarter, the previous yearly percent complete column will also be available for updates.
  • 16. In certain cases and as agreed to by MCC, comments may be provided in the local language. However, all publicly released comments should be provided in English.
  • 17. For more information on the QDRP Process, please refer to the QDRP Guidance located here: https://www.mcc.gov/resources/doc/quarterly-mca-disbursement-request-and-reporting-package.
  • 18. The ITT submission cycle timeline has been developed based on the average amount of time needed to finalize the ITT prior to the formal review of the QDRP. This process is independent of the requirements put forward in the QDRP Guidance and does not imply that any other component of the QDRP must be submitted prior to the formal review process.
  • 19. For AEs that submit in both MCC MIS and Excel, Phases I-III of the submission cycle should be done in the Excel ITT only. Once the ITT has been reviewed and informally cleared by M&E, the MCC RRA will instruct the AE to update the MCC MIS ITT accordingly.
  • 20. “Historical data” is defined as all data earlier than the program’s most recent previous quarter. For example, if the AE is submitting an ITT in Q5, all data in quarters 1-3 are “historical.” By default, historical data are not editable in either format of the ITT.
  • 21. In rare occasions, if there is not sufficient time for another round of review, the RRA may make approved HACR changes directly in the Excel ITT. However, the AE should make every effort to request historical changes with enough notice so that they may make the edits directly.
  • 22. While many reports are updated quarterly, several are updated bi-annually based on the frequency of new data availability. Additionally, many inter-agency reports to which MCC provides data are updated on an annual basis. The frequency by which MCC’s standard reports are updated is included in the table below.
  • 23. All M&E reports include the effective period of the data. In some instances, additional progress on an indicator may be made between the time the data are entered in the ITT and a report is finalized. These data cannot be reported officially until included as part of an approved ITT.
  • 24. The first Star Reports were made available in 2019. Star Reports for programs that closed prior to 2019 are in the process of being developed and will be made publicly available as they are finalized.
  • 25. MCC M&E Policy currently states that the Closeout ITT is due within 76 days of program closeout. However, this deadline was revised to allow more time for review of the draft Closeout ITT before the end of the closure period. The Program Closure Guidelines reflects the 70 days cited here and the deadline will be updated in the next version of the MCC M&E Policy.
  • 26. Should the decision be made to withhold data for an indicator, the RRA should make sure this decision is clearly documented in the supplemental table. The note should also include a detailed explanation about the efforts made to validate data before ultimately withholding it.
  • 27. Discussions of PC M&E Plans and PC ITTs in this section apply the threshold programs as well.
  • 28. Note that some indicators may be added exclusively for post program reporting that were not reported on during the life of the program. For these indicators, all columns lacking program data will be shaded.
  • 29. The yearly percent complete column should not be populated until the program has entered the relevant program year. (e.g. the Yearly Percent Complete for Program Year 2 will not be calculated until data has been entered in Q5, the first quarter of the program year).
  • 30. Any positive or negative number, including numbers with decimals up to the hundredths place.
  • 31. This column should be updated quarterly with the specific deadlines for the given quarter, taking into account weekends and holidays.