Appendix: Annual Performance Report

Compact Signing Amounts and Key Dates (in millions of $)*

Partner Country Compact Amount Signing Entry Into Force Closed Dates
Madagascar 109.8 4/18/2005 7/27/2005 8/31/2009
Honduras 215.0 6/14/2005 9/30/2005 9/30/2010
Cabo Verde 110.1 7/5/2005 10/18/2005 10/17/2010
Nicaragua 175.0 7/15/2005 5/26/2006 5/26/2011
Georgia 395.3 9/12/2005 4/7/2006 4/7/2011
Benin 307.3 2/22/2006 10/6/2006 10/6/2011
Vanuatu 65.7 3/2/2006 4/28/2006 4/28/2011
Armenia 235.7 3/27/2006 9/29/2006 9/29/2011
Ghana 547.0 8/1/2006 2/16/2007 2/16/2012
Mali 460.8 11/13/2006 9/18/2007 8/24/2012
El Salvador 460.9 11/29/2006 9/20/2007 9/20/2012
Mozambique 506.9 7/13/2007 9/22/2008 9/22/2013
Lesotho 362.6 7/23/2007 9/17/2008 9/17/2013
Morocco 697.5 8/31/2007 9/15/2008 9/15/2013
Mongolia 284.9 10/22/2007 9/17/2008 9/17/2013
Tanzania 698.1 2/17/2008 9/17/2008 9/17/2013
Burkina Faso 480.9 7/14/2008 7/31/2009 7/31/2014
Namibia 304.5 7/28/2008 9/16/2009 9/16/2014
Senegal 540.0 9/16/2009 9/23/2010 9/23/2015
Moldova 262.0 1/22/2010 9/1/2010 9/1/2015
Philippines 433.9 9/23/2010 05/25/11 5/25/2016
Jordan 275.1 10/25/2010 12/13/11 12/13/2016
Malawi 350.7 4/7/2011 9/20/2013
Indonesia 600.0 11/19/2011 4/2/2013
Cabo Verde, 2012 66.2 2/10/2012 11/30/2012 11/30/2017
Zambia 354.8 5/10/2012 11/15/2013
Georgia, 2013 140.0 7/26/2013 7/1/2014
Ghana, 2014 498.2 8/5/2014 9/6/2016
El Salvador, 2014 277.0 9/30/2014 9/9/2015
Benin, 2015 375.0 9/9/2015 6/22/2017
Liberia 256.7 10/2/2015 1/20/2016
Morocco, 2015 450.0 11/30/2015 6/30/2017
Niger 437.0 7/29/2016
Nepal 500.0 9/14/2017
Côte d’Ivoire 524.7 11/7/2017

* Please note that the values above are the signed compact amounts and do not reflect lower actual expenditures due to early terminations or funds for a compact not being fully spent. The table on the next page reflects the net obligations/commitments associated with each compact.

Compact Obligations and Commitments

Country/Description 2012 & Prior 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 Total
Closed Compacts $7,402.6 $7,402.6
Cabo Verde 66.2 66.2
El Salvador 117.0 160.0 277.0
Georgia 140.0 140.0
Ghana 17.0 283.0 198.2 498.2
Indonesia 600.0 600.0
Liberia 256.7 256.7
Malawi 350.7 350.7
Niger 58.0 379.0 437.0
Zambia 354.8 354.8
Benin 207.0 168.0 375.0
Morocco 114.1 1.2 168.7 166.0 450.0
Nepal 108.0 10.0 69.0  107.0  206.0 500.0
Côte d’Ivoire 40.5 9.0 272.0 10.0 26.2 167.0 524.7
Active Compacts $1,966.3 $670.2 $638.9 $669.7 $512.3 $373.0 $4,830.3
Mongolia 99.9 8.3 143.1 98.7 350.0
Senegal 81.6 44.4 3.4 18.7 180.4  178.0 506.5
Burkina Faso 4.0 300.0 304.0
Sri Lanka 343.0 107.0 450.0
Tunisia 142.0 150.5 292.5
Lesotho
Sri Lanka
Compacts in Development $181.5 $44.4 $11.7 $161.8 $279.1 $667.0 $557.5  $1,903.0
TOTAL  $9,550.4 $670.2 $683.3 $681.4 $674.1 $652.1  $667.0 $557.5  $14,135.9

Threshold Program Agreements Signing Amounts (in millions of $)

Country Sub-Saharan Africa Eurasia Latin America Middle East and North Africa Signing Date Completion Date
Burkina Faso 12.9 7/22/2005 9/30/2008
Malawi 20.9 9/23/2005 9/30/2008
Albania, 2006 13.9 4/3/2006 11/15/2008
Tanzania 11.2 5/3/2006 12/30/2008
Paraguay, 2006 34.6 5/8/2006 8/31/2009
Zambia 22.7 5/22/2006 2/28/2009
Philippines 20.7 7/26/2006 5/29/2009
Jordan 25.0 10/17/2006 8/29/2009
Indonesia 55.0 11/17/2006 12/31/2010
Ukraine 44.5 12/4/2006 12/31/2009
Moldova 24.7 12/14/2006 2/28/2010
Kenya 12.7 3/23/2007 12/31/2010
Uganda 10.4 3/29/2007 12/31/2009
Guyana 6.7 8/23/2007 2/23/2010
São Tomé & Principe 8.7 11/9/2007 4/15/2011
Kyrgyz Republic 16.0 3/14/2008 6/30/2010
Niger 23.1 3/17/2008 12/31/2015
Peru 35.6 6/9/2008 9/30/2012
Rwanda 24.7 9/24/2008 12/31/2011
Albania, 2008 15.7 9/29/2008 7/31/2011
Paraguay, 2009 30.3 4/13/2009 7/31/2012
Liberia 15.1 7/6/2010 12/1/2013
Timor-Leste 10.5 9/22/2010 3/31/2014
Honduras 15.6 8/29/2013 In progress
Guatemala 28.0 4/8/2015 In progress
Sierra Leone 44.4 11/17/2015 In progress
Kosovo 49.0 9/12/2017 In progress

Results of Recently Closed Compacts

Cabo Verde II

Policy Refoms
  • Environmental requirements, including an improved regime for the disposal of sludge according to international standards. The Ministry of Water and Irrigation will soon float a tender for the construction of the first mono landfill for the disposal of sludge and bio solids and for electricity generation.
Outputs Land Management for Investment Project

  • 11,418 households, commercial and other legal entities received formal recognition of ownership and/or use rights.
  • 28,985 parcels were corrected or incorporated into an official land information system.
  • 100% of targeted surfaced area on Sal Island has been incorporated into the Land Management Information and Transaction System (LMITS).
  • 38 land administration offices were established or upgraded.

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Project

  • In partnership with the Coca-Cola Africa Foundation, the Social Access Fund increased access to water and sanitation with over 3,500 households receiving subsidized water connections and more than 2,200 households benefiting from new sanitation facilities.
  • Construction of over 200 km of water pipeline and over 20 km of sanitation pipeline.
  • More than 60 reservoirs and pumping stations constructed or rehabilitated.
Preliminary and Expected Outcomes 1
  • The infrastructure improvements of the Water and Sanitation Fund supported utilities to improve or expand or improve their water and sanitation networks.
  • On Santiago Island, transformation of the water sector, including establishment of a new corporatized, consolidated utility—Aguas de Santiago, with more efficient and effective operations and management— has resulted in more than doubling the number of hours of water service many residents on the island receive per day, which has increased from about 6 hours to over 14 hours per day.
  • The Compact introduced an infrastructure grant facility to fund infrastructure works in the WASH sector. This innovative funding mechanism has inspired the Government of Cabo Verde to create a revolving fund to continue to fund the sector.
Evaluations Land Management for Investment Project

  • An independent evaluator is implementing a mixed methods performance evaluation to assess the impacts of LMI Project on investment in land and property, property values, land tenure security, time to process key land transactions, demand for formal land transactions, and tourism growth, as well as sustainability of the new systems and procedures introduced by the Project.
  • The evaluation includes three complementary components: a trend analysis examining changes in key outcomes over time using secondary data, a qualitative study collecting two rounds of in-depth interviews and focus groups with households and businesses to help interpret the findings from the trend analysis, and a multisite case study of large tourism related commercial investments to capture planned and actual investments in tourism development zones (known as  Zonas de Desenvolvimento Turístico Integral, or ZDTIs) to understand how the project affected these investments.
  • Given the concerns around women’s land rights, the evaluation will also include an analysis of how women’s land rights were captured in the clarification of rights and boundaries process and whether women and men benefit differently.
  • In support of the monitoring and evaluation, LMI stakeholders are collecting detailed land administrative data across multiple land and investment offices regarding key land transactions (sales, greenfield investments, mortgages and building permits) to better understand how the new Land Management and Information Transaction System (LMITs) and related clarification of rights and boundaries affects time to process a land transaction, demand for land services and related land markets.
  • The evaluation is anticipated to be completed in 2020 after a 3-year exposure period, with a final report in 2021.

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Project

  • MCC has contracted an independent evaluator to (1) document how the project activities were implemented along with key outcomes of those activities; (2) track changes in outcomes among households who received subsidized connections to the water network on Santiago through the Social Access Funds; (3) assess utility-level outcomes that are expected to be affected by the WASH project activities; and (4) evaluate how FASA funding might have incentivized utilities to corporatize, how households and utilities are affected by the infrastructure, and consider the prospects for the infrastructure to be sustainably managed. The evaluation is scheduled to complete an interim report in fall 2018 and a final report to be submitted in 2022.

Compact Modifications

MCC employs a risk-based approach to the management of its portfolio and uses a number of mechanisms to manage projects that face potential major modifications, including the following:

  • Quarterly portfolio reviews of all compacts, with a focus on high-risk projects and activities;
  • Early identification of high-risk projects;
  • Close collaboration with partner countries to develop plans to prevent, mitigate and manage project restructuring; and
  • Approval of modifications at the appropriate level.

MCC also conducts due diligence on programs in advance of compact signing to increase the reliability of technical, cost, and other estimates. During compact development, MCC makes project design modifications to mitigate potential completion risk, currency fluctuations and the potential for construction cost ovERRuns.

Summary of Restructurings and Reallocations in FY 2016
Project/Activity Programmatic Change Description
Indonesia Green Prosperity Project / Green Prosperity Facility Activity ($242 million) Reallocation of $12 million of funding from the Green Prosperity Facility to Technical Assistance and Oversight During finalization of the Green Prosperity (GP) Facility portfolio in mid-2016, MCA-Indonesia identified budget shortfalls for technical assistance and oversight. The funds are needed for program administration, oversight, and identification of new initiatives to mitigate implementation risks and improve project sustainability. Such support will help improve the chances of successful implementation of the project grants, and aid in the delivery of GP grant outputs.
Indonesia (Cont.) Procurement Modernization Project Reallocation of $7.7 million from the Program Administration and Control Activity to the Procurement Modernization Project’s Procurement Professionalization Activity The reallocation of funds was designed to help ensure project sustainability by including additional workshops, which would help expand socialization of key concepts, develop a competency-based professional certification program, and improve project investments under implementation. Moreover, MCA-Indonesia’s assessment showed that logistics costs for the project exceeded estimates, and additional support was needed to continue human resources development training with the projected beneficiaries to ensure program sustainability.
Indonesia (Cont.) Procurement Modernization Project Reallocation of $2.2 million from the Program Administration and Control Activity to the Procurement Modernization Project’s Policy and Procedure Development Activity The objectives of the Public Private Partnership (PPP) Sub-Activity are to develop Policies and Procedures on PPP Procurement, and Bidding Documents to facilitate the implementation of PPP procurement across a diverse set of economic and social sectors. Piloting of these projects requires identification and close cooperation between MCA-Indonesia and the Government of Indonesia as well as the selected PPP proponents. After evaluating the quality of existing pre-feasibility studies for the selected pilots, it became clear that the additional funds are needed to refine the existing studies in order for the PPP Sub-Activity to advance with the bidding documentation and the actual piloting of the new procurement policies and procedures.
Ghana Northern Electric Distribution Company (NEDCO) Financial and Operational Turnaround Project Approval by MCC management of a redesigned NEDCO Financial and Operational Turnaround Project in the amount of $54.2 million MCA-Ghana worked with MCC‘s Ghana country team to redesign the NEDCO project. The redesign, which was completed at the end of 2016, resulted in several material changes to the following activities: the Private Sector Participation Activity, the Modernizing Utility Operations Activity, the Tamale Service Area Improvement Activity, and the Commercial Development Activity. The redesigned project passes the 10 percent economic rate of return hurdle and was approved by MCC senior management in January 2017.
Zambia Infrastructure Activity Additional $22 million to be provided by the Government of the Republic of Zambia to support the completion of the Infrastructure Activity as originally planned During program implementation, it became clear that the cost to complete the Infrastructure Activity had increased due to unforeseen circumstances, including: Massive underground rock formations not detected during preparatory works; Change in the number of “Project Affected Persons” (persons losing assets because of the project who must compensated) and increased in-kind replacement of structures built in project corridors leading to increased resettlement costs; Underground utility relocations that had not been geo-referenced by utility companies that must be moved during construction works at a cost; Alignment of the detailed designs to adjust to changed circumstances in order to avoid high value impacts, and Increased costs associated with construction of the Bombay Drain. To mitigate this risk, the Zambians committed to contribute $22 million in 2017.

Estimating Compact Beneficiaries and Benefits

Under MCC‘s results framework, beneficiaries are defined as an individual and all members of his or her household who will experience an income gain as a result of MCC interventions. We consider that the entire household will benefit from the income gain and counts are multiplied by the average household size in the area or country. The beneficiary standard makes a distinction between individuals participating in a project and individuals expected to increase their income as a result of the project. Before signing a compact, MCC estimates the expected long-term income gains through a rigorous benefit-cost analysis. MCC may reassess and modify its beneficiary estimates and the present value of benefits when project designs change during implementation.

Compact 2 3 Estimated Number of Beneficiaries Estimated Long Term Income Gain Over the Life of the Project (PV of Benefits) 4
Armenia 428,000 $295,500,000
Benin 14,059,000 $409,600,000
Benin II 9,926,000 $320,500,000
Burkina Faso 1,181,000 $151,000,000
Cape Verde I 385,000 $149,300,000
Cape Verde II 604,000 $112,900,000
El Salvador 706,000 $377,800,000
El Salvador II 6,446,000 $224,500,000
Georgia 143,000 $301,300,000
Georgia II 1,770,000 $338,000,000
Ghana 1,217,000 $733,100,000
Honduras 1,705,000 $237,300,000
Indonesia 5 1,700,000 $217,000,000
Jordan 3,000,000 $398,900,000
Lesotho 1,041,000 $485,000,000
Liberia 564,000 $353,900,000
Madagascar 480,000 $123,200,000
Malawi 983,000 $567,200,000
Mali 2,837,000 $393,600,000
Moldova 414,000 $206,100,000
Mongolia 2,058,000 $314,800,000
Morocco 1,695,000 $805,400,000
Mozambique 2,685,000 $288,900,000
Namibia 1,063,000 $310,400,000
Nicaragua 119,000 $83,500,000
Philippines 125,822,000 $464,400,000
Senegal 1,550,000 $625,000,000
Tanzania 5,425,000 $1,474,000,000
Vanuatu 39,000 $73,800,000
Zambia 1,200,000 $306,600,000
Total for All Compacts 6 191,244,000 $11,142,500,000

Post Compact Economic Rates of Return

All MCC projects are independently evaluated, and these independent evaluations often include post compact ERRs. Independently calculated ERRs complement the closeout ERRs that MCC calculates at the end of the compact. Because independent evaluations occur 2-5 years after compact closure, independently calculated ERRs can offer an updated assessment of a project’s costs and benefits post-compact. However, these ERRs are still projections for projects whose benefits are often projected to last up to 20 years. Nonetheless, the independently produced post compact ERRs, which are based upon the best available evidence, complete the accountability loop in a way that is rare among donors. Two examples are below.

Results of the Mozambique Farmer Income Support Project

MCC’s Farmer Income Support Project (FISP) was designed to reduce the damage to the incomes of 1.7 million Mozambican farmers due to Coconut Lethal Yellowing Disease (CLYD).  This was to be accomplished through (i) short term surveillance, control, and mitigation services, prompt eradication of diseased palms, and replanting with the less susceptible Mozambican Green Tall coconut variety, and (ii) Technical advisory services to introduce crop-diversification options.  Given projected benefits to farmers’ incomes and the costs of the program, MCC originally projected the project to have an economic rate of return of 25.1 percent.

An independent evaluation of the FISP project’s impacts found that cutting trees and burning tree stumps in epidemic areas did reduce CLYD prevalence, but not to the degree originally forecast, resulting in lower than expected productivity impacts. Likewise, endemic area alternative crop uptake was lower than expected, likely due to insufficient input and output market linkages. The resulting updated, ex-post ERR estimate was 16.8 percent.  Greater detail on the evaluation and lessons learned are available in MCC’s public evaluation catalogue. 7

Results of the Nicaragua Transportation Project

MCC’s Nicaragua Transportation Project was designed to stimulate economic development and improve access to markets and social services by reducing transportation costs.  It upgraded and rehabilitated 68 km of roads, consisting of two secondary roads and a trunk road.  MCC’s originally estimated an economic return from the project of 13.2 percent based on reduced vehicle operating costs and travel time savings for road users, including those who would travel on the road due to improved road conditions resulting from the project.

The independent evaluation of this project estimated actual impacts using data from 2 years after the roads were completed.  It found that the road roughness, a key indicator of transport costs, decreased 80 percent on average, and traffic increased 12 percent on average over the 2 years to 3,062 vehicles per day.  At the same time, the capital costs for the road works came in on average 2.2 times those estimated prior to implementation.  Given this balance of measured benefits and costs, the resulting “ex-post” ERR fell to 2.1 percent, primarily due to these higher costs.  (Benefits were roughly consistent with ex-ante estimates.) Greater detail on the evaluation and lessons learned are available in MCC’s public evaluation catalogue, 8 and recently published Principles into Practice: Lessons from MCC’s Investments in Roads. 9

Portfolio by Sector

Investments by Sector

Sector Amount ($ Millions)
Transportation (Road, Water & Air) $3,044.4
Agriculture $1,963.6
Energy $1,889.3
Health, Education & Community Services $1,662.8
Program Administration & Monitoring $1,248.3
Water Supply & Sanitation $1,088.8
Governance $649.2
Financial Services $159.8
Total $11,706.2

Results by Sector as of FY 2017 Q4

Sector Indicator Total Portfolio Actuals (cumulative value 2005-present) Data Points (number of compacts) Active and Completed Countries Tracked (underlined indicates still active)
Roads Temporary employment generated in road construction 49,822 6 Armenia, Burkina Faso, Cabo Verde, El Salvador, El Salvador II, Georgia, Ghana, Honduras, Liberia, Mali, Moldova, Mongolia, Mozambique, Nicaragua, Philippines, Senegal, Tanzania, Vanuatu
Kilometers of roads completed 3,035 15
Agriculture & Irrigation Farmers trained 330,814 14 Armenia, Burkina Faso, Cabo Verde, El Salvador, Georgia, Ghana, Honduras, Indonesia, Madagascar, Mali, Moldova, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nicaragua, Senegal
Farmers who have applied improved practices as a result of training 126,592 10
Hectares under improved irrigation 203,963 8
Value of agricultural and rural loans $87,074,694 9
Water & Sanitation Temporary employment generated in water and sanitation construction 21,459 6 Cabo Verde II, El Salvador, Georgia, Ghana, Jordan, Lesotho, Mozambique, Tanzania, Zambia
People trained in hygiene and sanitary best practices 12,135 6
Water points constructed 1,181 3
Operating cost coverage 93% 4
Access to improved water supply 63% 3
Education Students participating 215,607 7 Burkina Faso, El Salvador, El Salvador II, Georgia II, Ghana, Mongolia, Morocco, Namibia
Facilities completed 772 6
Graduates from MCC-supported education activities 62,211 5
Land Legal and regulatory reforms adopted 127 7 Benin, Burkina Faso, Cabo Verde II, Ghana, Indonesia, Lesotho, Madagascar, Mali, Mongolia, Mozambique, Namibia, Nicaragua, Senegal
Stakeholders trained 76,531 11
Land administration offices established or upgraded 399 8
Parcels corrected or incorporated in land system 338,393 8
Land rights formalized 321,508 7
Power Kilometers of lines completed 4,318 4 El Salvador, Georgia, Ghana, Ghana II, Indonesia, Liberia, Malawi, Mongolia, Tanzania

Sector Results at a Glance

Numbers are cumulative since the agency’s founding in 2004 and current as of September 2017.

Once a country is selected as eligible to develop a compact or threshold program, the first step in MCC’s process is to work with partner country officials to conduct a rigorous, joint analysis that identifies the most binding constraints to economic growth. These results help prioritize MCC’s investments in the areas that are the biggest impediments to private investment and poverty reduction and may include access to credit, governance, electricity, transportation, or education. Constraints to growth are different for each country and ultimately drive MCC’s investment strategy. Below are highlights of MCC’s sector investments that have emerged from this analysis.

Power

2,683 miles of electricity lines completed
MCC is making major investments in the energy sector to reduce energy poverty in Nepal, Benin, Ghana, Liberia, Malawi and Sierra Leone, while encouraging power sector reforms that complement infrastructure investments. In Liberia, MCC’s compact funds the rehabilitation of a hydropower facility to increase the amount of generated electricity, facilitate lower overall electricity rates, and increase the reliability and adequacy of electricity. In Ghana, the government took significant steps to revitalize its power sector by inviting the private sector to invest in one of its national distribution utility.  Implementation of the compact with Benin continues while significant construction works for large-scale, on-grid generation, transmission and distribution projects are underway in Malawi, as well as smaller-scale, on- and off-grid energy projects in Indonesia. In Sierra Leone, MCC began carrying out its threshold program to build the capacity of the newly established power regulator and power generation and transmission utility.  In Nepal, preparations are underway for the design of the transmission line funded under the compact.  In addition, Kosovo’s threshold program will strengthen the power sector by fostering a market-driven approach to lowering energy costs for households and business, and developing new sources of electricity generation.

Transportation

2,500 miles of road completed
1,000 additional miles of roadway under construction

In May 2016, the Philippines, using MCC compact funding, successfully completed the reconstruction/rehabilitation of 137.9 miles of a road in the Samar and Eastern Samar provinces of the country that will help lower transport costs and travel time and opens up possibilities for new markets. For the Niger Compact, investments were prepared for the upgrading of approximately 198 miles of roads to international standards, and enhancement of both national and regional connectivity. Implementation of technical assistance and policy reform activities that would set Liberia on a long-term path to a sustainable road maintenance were started.  In Nepal, a comprehensive technical assistance program targeting capacity building in road maintenance planning and construction has been launched and includes plans to conduct the periodic maintenance of approximately 300km of roads.  In Cote D’Ivoire, the design of major rehabilitation and upgrading of four (4) major urban corridors in the metropolitan area of Abidjan has been launched.  In El Salvador, the construction tender for a capacity upgrading of the heavily trafficked segment of 18 miles of coastal highway has been completed and construction is scheduled to start in early winter 2018.

Water and Sanitation

12,135 people trained in hygiene and sanitary best practices
1,181 water points constructed

MCC supports capital improvements and policy and institutional reforms to improve the level and quality of water and sanitation services in partner countries. MCC’s five year compact with Jordan, for example, closed in FY 2016 after investing more than $200 million for rehabilitation and construction of water supply and wastewater infrastructure including investment in the As-Samra wastewater treatment plant where treated effluent will be diverted for agricultural use saving precious bulk water supply for this water poor nation. MCC’s compact investment in Zambia is strengthening the main water utility company to improve billings and collections and provide more reliable service to its customers. In Sierra Leone, MCC is partnering with the government on a threshold program to implement policy reforms, build institutional capacity and improve governance in the water sector in Freetown. A comprehensive assessment of the water utility in Guma Valley was conducted to determine the priority areas of assistance for strengthening utility performance but because a cost-benefit analysis is not required for threshold program assistance, the estimated number of beneficiaries above does not include the Sierra Leone beneficiaries.

Agriculture and Irrigation

330,814 farmers trained
504,004 acres (203,963 hectares) under improved irrigation
In July 2016, MCC signed a $437 million compact with Niger focused on strengthening the agricultural sector. Through the compact’s Irrigation and the Market Access Project, MCC will work with the Government of Niger to improve irrigation, including the rehabilitation and development of three large-scale irrigation systems in the Dosso and Tahoua regions, to increase crop yields, sustainable fishing and livestock productivity. In addition, the project will reform policies and institutions, including the establishment of a national water resource management plan and natural resource and land use management plans, and create local capacities to increase understanding of best-practices to sustainably use and maintain irrigation and market infrastructure.

Land

321,508 household, commercial, and legal entities gained protected land rights
MCC works with partner countries to improve land governance and administration, strengthen property rights, and stimulate private-sector investment for more productive land use. In Cabo Verde, MCC has invested to reduce the time required to register property rights and establish more conclusive land records in areas with high development potential. MCC funding was used under a pilot activity to complete surveys for 100 percent of land parcels on the island of Sal, which are now being registered. This activity led to the passage of a legal amendment in August 2016 that streamlined the land survey and registration process. MCC is now funding the survey and registration of an additional 22,824 parcels on the islands of Boa Vista, Maio, and Sao Vicente. In Indonesia, MCC’s investment in natural resource management and renewable energy includes development of a methodology for community-based participatory mapping of village boundaries and cultural and natural resources. Following this methodology, villages are able to produce legally recognized village maps to enhance land use plans. As of September 30, 2016, MCC funding had assisted 114 communities in defining and demarcating the boundaries of their villages. Land and natural resource information systems were being installed in government offices in 35 districts across 10 provinces to provide decision-makers with the information they need to encourage investment while effectively supporting the management of their land and other natural resources.

Education

772 education facilities constructed or rehabilitated
4,716 instructors trained
215,607 students participating in MCC-supported education activities

MCC works with partner countries to ensure that students obtain the knowledge and skills demanded by the private sector. In FY 2016, El Salvador officially announced its commitment to reform the technical and vocational education and training (TVET) system, identifying four transformative industries to target. The Salvadorians are establishing Skills Sector Committees for each of these four industries to define demand-driven training programs to feed into the overall technical and vocational educating training system. In Georgia, 26 schools have been completed, with another 3 on track to be completed by December 2017 and hundreds of students will be able to move into highly improved learning environments. Also in Georgia, more than 1,600 principals have been trained. The MCA-Georgia TVET Facility has awarded its first round of grants totaling approximately $12 million, slated to be disbursed in 2018. In September 2016, construction tenders were successfully launched for rehabilitation of pilot schools for MCC’s Morocco Compact. Also in Morocco, preparations are underway to field test an innovative Integrated School Improvement Model that will eventually be implemented in approximately 100 secondary schools, and planning advanced significantly for a TVET Grant Facility as well as a results-based financing component of the compact that aims to improve job placement for women and at-risk youth.  In Cote D’Ivoire, MCC signed a Compact with the government in November 2017.  The Compact includes an education project with investments in both secondary education and TVET.  The secondary education activity will increase access to and the quality of education for students, while the TVET activity will introduce a demand-driven model of skills development with private sector governance.  Further, the Guatemala threshold program now includes a TVET component.

Health

1,564 health providers trained on growth monitoring
6,857 service providers trained on community-led total sanitation triggering
16,797 service providers trained on infant and young child feeding

MCC works with partner countries to integrate sanitation, maternal and child health, and nutrition interventions to reduce stunting and increase household income. In Indonesia, MCC has committed more than $130 million to improve nutrition and health. MCC’s Indonesia Compact includes a partnership with the World Bank using incentives-based community grants to increase the demand for health, nutrition and education services and improves the health sector’s capacity to respond to increased demand at the facility and community level. In Sierra Leone, MCC has committed $5 million to improve access to reliable and safe water and sanitation (WASH) services, and to promote WASH practices at the household level. Increased access to safe drinking water, food, and sanitation services is critical to improving children’s nutritional status and preventing environmental enteropathy, which has been associated with growth failure in children.

Common Indicators

Agriculture and Irrigation (all common indicators data as of September 10, 2017)

Process Indicators Output Indicators Outcome Indicators
Country Region (AI-1)
Value of signed irrigation feasibility and design contracts (USD)
(AI-2)
Percent disbursed of irrigation feasibility and design contracts
(AI-3)
Value of signed irrigation construction contracts (USD)
(AI-4)
Percent disbursed of irrigation construction contracts
(AI-5) Temporary employment generated in irrigation (AI-6)
Farmers trained
(AI-7) Enterprises assisted (AI-8)
Hectares under improved irrigation
(AI-9)
Loan borrowers
(AI-10)
Value of agricultural and rural loans (USD)
(AI-11) Farmers who have applied improved practices as a result of training (AI-12) Hectares under improved practices as a result of training (AI-13) Enterprises that have applied improved techniques
MCC Total 51,925,328 87.3% 698,425,169 90.2% 6,908 330,814 4,223 203,963 1,195 87,074,694 126,592 42,226 1,016
EAPLA* Total 10,686,574 93.0% 190,892,731 88.1% 2,975 139,419 1,597 11,926 1,099 66,414,932 56,496 7,279 418
AFRICA Total 41,238,754 85.8% 507,532,438 90.9% 3,933 191,395 2,626 192,037 96 20,659,762 70,096 34,947 598
Armenia EAPLA 4,601,073 100.0% 106,653,443 100.0% 2,389 45,639 227 1,008 13,133,200 26,424 178
El Salvador 15,363 281 29 4,598,748 11,520 163
Georgia 1,155,881 53.4% 291 19,880,003
Honduras 7,265 464 400 17,100,000 6,996
Indonesia 55,479
Moldova 4,929,620 95.7% 84,239,288 73.0% 586 6,569 334 11,526 62 11,702,981 2,452 7,279 77
Nicaragua 9,104 9,104
Burkina Faso AFRICA 17,268,474 74.8% 74,339,448 95.3% 2,414 12,307 278 2,240 96 2,802,000 8,237 3,369 28
Cabo Verde I 5,167,848 97.6% 553 13 617,000 106
Ghana 5,202,887 100.0% 13,009,963 100.0% 66,930 1,724 514 16,740,762 59,060 535
Madagascar 31,366 324 1,892 1
Mali 9,077,220 98.2% 148,951,503 98.3% 1,308 97,503 500,000 801
Morocco 111,353,027 99.0% 40,863 114 53,376 31,578 34
Mozambique 28,830 186
Namibia 9,238
Senegal 9,690,173 86.3% 154,710,649 75.0% 1,519 38,391
Gender**
Female 227 67,733 107 121 924,102 17,660 20
Male 4,292 156,967 413 1,066 13,580,879 40,077 85

All program data are as of September 10, 2017. Data are preliminary and subject to adjustment. Grey shading indicates closed-out Compacts; data revision is not expected for these Compacts. Indicators in this Results Framework may be added, removed, or modified as MCC‘s investments in education evolve over time. All MCC education programs have as their long-term end goal an increase in individual or household income and a corresponding decrease in poverty.

* Gender totals may not match overall totals due to lack of gender counting in earlier compacts.

Education

Process Indicators Output Indicators Outcome Indicators
Country Region (E-1)
Value of signed educational facility construction, rehabilitation, and equipping contracts (USD)
(E-2)
Percent disbursed of educational facility construction, rehabilitation, and equipping contracts
(E-3)
Legal, financial, and policy reforms adopted
(E-4)
Educational facilities constructed or rehabilitated
(E-5)
Instructors trained
(E-6)
Students participating in MCC-supported education activities
(E-7)
Graduates from MCC-supported education activities
(E-8)
Employed graduates of MCC-supported education activities
MCC Total 208,031,689 92.4% 5 772 4,716 215,607 62,211
EAPLA Total 65,724,596 78.7% 5 66 2,107 48,599 16,252
AFRICA Total 142,307,093 98.7% 706 2,609 167,008 45,959
El Salvador I EAPLA 9,857,585 99.8% 22 378 30,672 4,285
El Salvador II
Georgia II** 27,687,683 52.0% 26 359 447
Mongolia 28,179,328 97.6% 5 18 1,370 17,480 11,967
Burkina Faso AFRICA 22,758,211 99.9% 396 557 31,065 4,035
Ghana 18,689,747 100.0% 250 41,019
Morocco 4,568,837 76.2% 2,052 93,424 41,383
Morocco II
Namibia 96,290,298 99.2% 60 1,500 541
Gender*
Female 2,420 72,963 36,990
Male 2,296 64,468 20,513

All program data are as of September 10, 2017. Data are preliminary and subject to adjustment. Grey shading indicates closed-out Compacts; data revision is not expected for these Compacts. Indicators in this Results Framework may be added, removed, or modified as MCC‘s investments in education evolve over time. All MCC education programs have as their long-term end goal an increase in individual or household income and a corresponding decrease in poverty.

* Gender totals may not match overall totals due to lack of gender counting in earlier compacts.
** (E-5) Number decreased from 30 to 26 because it was misreported in the previous quarter.

Land

Output Indicators Outcome Indicators
Country Region (L-1) Legal and regulatory reforms adopted (L-2) Land administration offices established or upgraded (L-3) Stakeholders trained (L-4) Conflicts successfully mediated (L-5) Parcels corrected or incorporated in land system (L-6) Land rights formalized (L-7) Percentage change in time for property transactions (L-8) Percentage change in cost for property transactions
MCC Total 127 399 76,531 12,433 338,393 321,508 NA NA
EAPLA Total 6 15 6,949 10,639 18,336 20,672  NA NA
AFRICA Total 121 384 69,582 1,794 320,057 300,836  NA NA
Indonesia EAPLA 3,029
Mongolia 6 15 3,920 10,639 18,336 20,672
Nicaragua
Benin AFRICA 50
Burkina Faso 54 78 61,057 1,364 18,490 4,793
Cabo Verde II 29 38 439 178 22,913 9,723
Ghana 4 3 427 23 1,481
Lesotho 11 1 575 151 53,296 21,753 -93
Madagascar 4 237
Mali 1 1,354
Mozambique 26 1,516 205,005 251,556
Morocco II
Namibia 19 2,524 8,869 4,356
Senegal 1,640 78 10,003 8,655
Gender*
Male 53,837 85,665
Female 21,538 55,141
Joint 18,802
Location*
Urban 195,308 154,475
Rural 89,789 124,608

All program data are as of September 10, 2017. Data are preliminary and subject to adjustment. Grey shading indicates closed-out Compacts; data revision is not expected for these Compacts. Indicators in this Results Framework may be added, removed, or modified as MCC‘s investments in education evolve over time. All MCC education programs have as their long-term end goal an increase in individual or household income and a corresponding decrease in poverty.

* Gender and location totals may not match overall totals due to lack of counting by gender and location in earlier compacts.

Power

Process Indicators Output Indicators
Country Region (P-1)
Value of signed power infrastructure feasibility and design contracts
(P-2)
Percent disbursed of power infrastructure feasibility and design contracts
(P-3)
Value of signed power infrastructure construction contracts
(P-4)
Percent disbursed of power infrastructure construction contracts
(P-5)
Temporary employment generated in power infrastructure construction
(P-6)
Generation capacity added
(P-7 and P-10) Km lines upgraded or built (P-8)
Transmission throughput capacity added
(P-9 and P-11) Substation capacity added (P-12)
Customers added by project
(P-13)
Maintenance expenditure-asset value ratio
(P-14)
Cost-reflective tariff regime
MCC Total 21,691,032 105.6% 489,000,472 68.6% 8,293 44 4,318 NA 84 35,412 NA NA
EAPLA Total 0.0% 0 0.0% 1,523 NA 35,412 NA NA
AFRICA total 21,691,032 105.6% 489,000,472 68.6% 8,293 44 2,796 NA 84 NA NA
El Salvador EAPLA 1,523 35,412
Georgia
Indonesia
Mongolia
Benin II AFRICA
Ghana 99
Ghana II
Liberia*** 101,773,325 100.0% 44 24 84
Malawi 5,943,608 98.0% 233,674,595 44.0% 4,220 2
Tanzania 15,747,424 108.6% 153,552,553 85.3% 4,073 2,673
T&D
Transmission
Distribution 4,294
Gender*
Female
Male
Grid
On-grid
Off-grid
Tariff class
Residential
Commercial
Industrial

All program data are as of September 10, 2017. Data are preliminary and subject to adjustment. Grey shading indicates closed-out Compacts; data revision is not expected for these Compacts.
*Gender totals may not match overall totals due to lack of gender counting in earlier compacts.
** This is a monitoring indicator and cannot be attributed solely to MCC investment.
*** Not all common indicator data for Liberia were included for this quarter as the data are still being verified.
****In Ghana II there are two utilities who report different SAIDI and SAIFI numbers. P-21 – ECG: 24.02, NEDCo: 35 P-22 – ECG: 23.57, NEDCo: 39.5

Power (continued)

Outcome Indicators
Country Region (P-15)
Total electricity supply
(P-16)
Power plant availability
(P-17)
Installed  generation capacity
(P-18)
Transmission system technical losses (%)
(P-19)
Distribution system losses
(P-20)
Commercial losses
(P-21)
System Average Interruption Duration Index (SAIDI)
(P-22)
System Average Interruption Frequency Index (SAIFI)
(P-23)
Total electricity sold
(P-24)
Operating cost-recovery ratio
(P-25)
Percentage
of households connected to the national grid
(P-26)
Share of
renewable energy in the country
MCC Total 13,796,863 NA 5,732 NA NA NA NA NA 1,810,250 NA NA NA
EAPLA Total 0 NA 0 NA NA NA NA NA 0 NA NA NA
AFRICA total 13,796,863 NA 5,732 NA NA NA NA NA 1,810,250 NA NA NA
El Salvador EAPLA
Georgia
Indonesia
Mongolia
Benin II AFRICA
Ghana
Ghana II 11,935,781 77.6 4,316 24.02; 35**** 23.57; 39.5****
Liberia*** 60,236 65 139 81 57 29,156 6 32
Malawi 1,800,846 108 327 23.2 18.3 1,455,324 67.60 100
Tanzania 949 325,769
T&D
Transmission
Distribution
Gender*
Female
Male
Grid
On-grid
Off-grid
Tariff class
Residential
Commercial
Industrial

All program data are as of September 10, 2017. Data are preliminary and subject to adjustment. Grey shading indicates closed-out Compacts; data revision is not expected for these Compacts.
*Gender totals may not match overall totals due to lack of gender counting in earlier compacts.
** This is a monitoring indicator and cannot be attributed solely to MCC investment.
*** Not all common indicator data for Liberia was included for this quarter as the data is still being verified.
****In Ghana II there are two utilities who report different SAIDI and SAIFI numbers. P-21 – ECG: 24.02,
NEDCo: 35 P-22 – ECG: 23.57, NEDCo: 39.5

Roads

Process Indicators Output Indicators Outcome Indicators
Country Region (R-1)
Value of signed road feasibility and design contracts
(R-2)
Percent disbursed of road feasibility and design contracts
(R-3)
Kilometers of roads under design
(R-4)
Value of signed road construction contracts
(R-5)
Percent disbursed of road construction contracts
(R-6)
Kilometers of roads under works contracts
(R-7)
Temporary employment generated in road construction
(R-8)
Kilometers of roads completed
(R-9) Roughness (R-10)
Average annual daily traffic
(R-11)
Road traffic fatalities
MCC Total 130,499,160 96.7% 4,465 2,345,958,621 88.8% 3,918 49,822 3,035 NA NA 655
EAPLA Total 64,075,771 93% 1,791 1,084,655,312 90% 1834.3 1,309 1,749
AFRICA Total 66,423,389 100% 2,675 1,261,303,310 87% 2083.4 48,513 1,286 651
Armenia EAPLA 24.4 3.47 735
El Salvador I 18,321,410 99% 223 248,378,825 97% 223.0 223.32
El Salvador II 32
Georgia 11,980,000 99% 197,299,030 100% 220.2 220.20 1.50 1,092
Honduras 9,500,000 75% 673 179,400,000 72% 673.0 610.10
Moldova 96 100,807,443 96% 96.0 1,309 96 4
Mongolia 6,083,650 89% 19.3 73,108,907 91% 176.4 176.40 1.90 353
Nicaragua 375.5 56,507,526 100% 74.0 74.0
Philippines 15,235,623 94% 222.0 173,156,531 81% 222.0 175.0
Vanuatu 2,955,088 100% 150 55,997,051 97% 149.7 149.70 3.00
Burkina Faso AFRICA 8,339,651 115% 536 140,205,145 102% 419.1 4,162 277.80 6
Cape Verde I 3,520,000 92% 63 24,280,000 100% 40.6 40.60 2.00
Ghana 5,549,044 100% 943 250,604,022 100% 446.4 35,455 445.03 602
Liberia
Mali 42,918,038 35% 81.0 79.00
Mozambique** 17,669,992 85% 253 132,240,557 88% 253.0 2,308 253
Senegal 12,201,371 102% 406 271,128,882 70% 375.0 2,757 *** 43
Tanzania 19,143,331 107% 473 399,926,666 91% 468.34 3,831 190.14
Gender*
Male 13,260 45
Female 1,197 4
Road Type*
Primary 65,222,944 23% 2,093 1,342,644,867 90% 1,867 1,177.58
Secondary 24,735,623 87% 1,374 617,229,323 85% 1,133 478.65
Tertiary 6,719,183 112% 935 164,505,401 66% 681 1,077.77

All program data are as of September 10, 2017. Data are preliminary and subject to adjustment. Grey shading indicates closed-out Compacts; data revision is not expected for these Compacts.
*Gender and road type totals may not match overall totals due to lack of counting by gender and road type in earlier Compacts.
** The kilometers of roads completed for Mozambique is provisional data. Subject to change after verification of takeover certificates.
*** According to the Common Indicator definition, a road is completed when official certificates are handed over and approved. In Senegal, this was taken to mean final acceptance of the road works, which typically happens after the end of the 1 year defects liability period which starts when the construction is completed and the roads are provisionally accepted. As part of its Compact, Senegal intended to rehabilitate 372 kilometers of national roads. By September 2015, when the Senegal Compact closed, no roads had achieved final acceptance, and therefore were not officially completed, per the common indicator definition. However, by the end of the Compact, 185km of roads had been fully rehabilitated and had received provisional acceptance. An additional 72km were provisionally accepted in November 2015, and the remaining 116km are anticipated to be provisionally accepted with the support of the Government of Senegal by mid-2016.

Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene

Process Indicators Output Indicators
Country Region (WS-1)
Value of signed water and sanitation feasibility and design contracts (USD)
(WS-2)
Percent disbursed of water and sanitation feasibility and design contracts
(WS-3)
Value of signed water and sanitation construction contracts (USD)
(WS-4)
Percent disbursed of water and sanitation construction contracts
(WS-5) Temporary employment generated in water and sanitation construction (WS-6)
People trained in hygiene and sanitary best practices
(WS-7)
Water points constructed
MCC Total 57,878,874 96.1% 798,435,421 81.4% 21,459 12,135 1,181
EAPLA Total 5,250,665 96.2% 303,498,694 98.8% 3,825 2,406
AFRICA Total 52,628,209 96.1% 494,936,726 70.7% 17,634 9,729 1,181
El Salvador EAPLA 4,983,800 96.0% 10,451,448 97.5% 2,406
Georgia 266,865 100.0% 54,315,000 94.2%
Jordan 238,732,246 100% 3,825
Cabo Verde II**** AFRICA 730,419 82.0% 18,739,566 78.0% 759 32
Ghana 1,475,148 100.0% 13,949,465 100.0% 778 392
Lesotho 3,594,133 100.0% 59,733,645 89% 11,527 454 175
Mozambique 35,076,009 99.1% 169,500,497 87.5% 2,276 8,400 614
Tanzania 6,861,280 102.1% 45,403,796 81.1% 387
Zambia 4,891,220 64.0% 187,609,757 44.0% 2,685 65
Gender*
Female 1,059 5,777
Male 8,486 5,904

All program data are as of September 10, 2017. Data are preliminary and subject to adjustment. Grey shading indicates closed-out Compacts; data revision is not expected for these Compacts.
*Gender totals may not match overall totals due to lack of gender counting in earlier compacts.
** This is a monitoring indicator; any change over baseline data represents the current trend and does not represent the direct impact of the MCC‐investment.
*** Jordan’s M&E Plan has, throughout the life of the compact, defined hours of supply as hours/week. As such all documentation is in this form. The value here has been divided by 7 here to accurately reflect supply hours per day.
****(WS-8): In Cabo Verde II the utility is in transition and during this period it has experienced challenges with its billing system and low collection rates, which accounts for some of the high rates of Non revenue water.
****(WS-5): Number decreased due to a correction in previously recorded data in Cabo Verde II.
*****The current unit for volume of water produced has a discrepancy. MCC M&E is in the process of revising this common indicator to clarify and align with current industry standards.

Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene (continued)

Outcome Indicators
Country Region (WS-8)
Non revenue water
(WS-9)
Continuity of service
(WS-10)
Operating cost coverage
(WS-11)**
Volume of water produced*****
(WS-12)
Access to improved water supply
(WS-13)
Access to improved sanitation
(WS-14)**
Residential water consumption
(WS-15)**
Industrial/Commercial water consumption
(WS-16)**
Prevalence of diarrhea
MCC Total 52.9% NA NA 220,152,344 NA NA NA NA NA
EAPLA Total 50.7%
AFRICA Total 55.1% 220,152,344
El Salvador EAPLA 83.0% 88%
Georgia
Jordan 50.7% 7.35*** 85.6% 67% 54.1 3.1
Cabo Verde II**** AFRICA 97.5% 14.6 64% 81.50% 75 22.0
Ghana 36.0
Lesotho 27.0%
Mozambique 23.4% 19.5
Tanzania 48.8% 113.1% 200,330,000 166.5 998,439.6
Zambia 47.0% 18 110.0% 19,822,344
Gender*
Female
Male

All program data are as of September 10, 2017. Data are preliminary and subject to adjustment. Grey shading indicates closed-out Compacts; data revision is not expected for these Compacts.
*Gender totals may not match overall totals due to lack of gender counting in earlier compacts.
** This is a monitoring indicator; any change over baseline data represents the current trend and does not represent the direct impact of the MCC‐investment.
*** Jordan’s M&E Plan has, throughout the life of the compact, defined hours of supply as hours/week. As such all documentation is in this form. The value here has been divided by 7 here to accurately reflect supply hours per day.
****(WS-8): In Cabo Verde II the utility is in transition and during this period it has experienced challenges with its billing system and low collection rates, which accounts for some of the high rates of Non revenue water.
****(WS-5): Number decreased due to a correction in previously recorded data in Cabo Verde II.
*****The current unit for volume of water produced has a discrepancy. MCC M&E is in the process of revising this common indicator to clarify and align with current industry standards.

FY 2018 Corporate Goals

For FY 2018, MCC management established four specific goals to guide agency planning and performance for the year. These goals build on MCC’s current strategic plan, NEXT, as the agency awaits incoming political leadership. As in past years, these corporate goals are the starting point for annual department and division goal-setting, from which staff develop their individual performance plans. Below you will find MCC’s FY 2018 corporate goals with a brief description of MCC’s progress to date.

Corporate Priority Progress
Advance and deliver high‐quality compacts and threshold programs. For program development, MCC is on target to present compact programs with Mongolia, Senegal and Sri Lanka to the Board in FY 2018, while closely monitoring progress on potential compact programs with Tunisia and Burkina Faso to ensure successful Board presentations in FY 2019. MCC is also monitoring ongoing governance challenges in Togo to determine the best path forward for the proposed Togo threshold program, while initiating compact and threshold program development, respectively, with Timor-Leste and the Gambia.For program implementation, highlights include the signing on the Cote d’Ivoire compact and the successful close out of MCC’s $66 million compact with Cabo Verde in November, as well as entry into force of the Niger compact in January 2018. MCC is also preparing for close out in Indonesia and Honduras, while closely monitoring implementation progress across the compact and threshold program portfolio.
Strengthen organization health and effectiveness. For FY 2018, MCC is focused on three improvements—reforming MCC’s performance management system, implementing targeted efforts to improve knowledge management, and creating tools to better link workforce decisions to agency business needs. For performance management, the agency launched a new recognition program and successfully completed the FY 2017 review cycle utilizing new agency-wide leadership dimensions/guidance. For knowledge management, MCC completed an assessment and is implementing key elements of the KM action plan. On workforce planning, the agency launched an organizational development assessment and continues to make progress on improved workforce demand tools.
Enhance operational and technical agility. As described elsewhere in this document, MCC launched an “efficiency challenge” to identify opportunities to improve and shorten the program development process, launched the new Star Report tool to consolidate and streamline reporting, rolled out a new U.S. market outreach strategy, and is piloting new program management tools for country partners to better and more consistently manage—and report to MCC about—compact projects/activities.
Advance MCC policy and legislative initiatives. In anticipation of MCC’s incoming leadership team, the agency is preparing several key policy and legislative initiatives for consideration by new leadership. Specifically, MCC continues to engage with Congress to obtain concurrent compact authority for the purposes of making regional investments, with legislation expected to be voted on by the full Senate and the House in early 2018. In addition, the agency has continued efforts to better assess and measure the impact of MCC programs/activities focused on policy and institutional reform.



Footnotes
  • 1. Cabo Verde II closed in November 2017 and updated beneficiary numbers will be available in February 2018. As a result, information on beneficiaries is not included in this document.
  • 2. The table includes estimates for compacts that have ERRs from which income benefit calculations can be drawn. Information for Indonesia is only available for one out of three projects at this time.
  • 3. These estimates do not include the projected beneficiaries of projects or activities that have been terminated or suspended by MCC (Madagascar, Honduras, Nicaragua, Mali, and Armenia). In the case of Madagascar, the estimates account for the compact’s early termination.
  • 4. The Present Value (PV) of Benefits is the sum of all projected benefits accruing over the life of the project, typically 20 years, evaluated at a 10% discount rate. Estimates are reported in millions of US$ in the year that the ERR analysis was completed. Because the PV of benefits uses a discount rate, these figures cannot be compared directly to the undiscounted financial costs of MCC compacts, but must be compared to the PV of costs instead.
  • 5. The table includes estimates for compacts that have ERRs from which income benefit calculations can be drawn. Information for Indonesia is only available for one out of three projects at this time.
  • 6. Column totals may not equal the sum of the individual rows due to rounding.
  • 7. https://data.MCC.gov/evaluations/index.php/catalog
  • 8. https://data.MCC.gov/evaluations/index.php/catalog
  • 9. https://www.MCC.gov/our-impact/principles-into-practice