Congressional Budget Justification (CBJ): Congressional Budget Justification, FY 2023 | March 2022

Appendix

Appendix: Annual Performance Report

Compact Amounts at Signing and Key Dates (in millions of $)*

Partner Country Compact Amount Signed Entry Into Force Compact
End Date
Madagascar $109.8 04/18/2005 07/27/2005 08/31/2009
Honduras $215.0 06/14/2005 09/30/2005 09/30/2010
Cabo Verde $110.1 07/05/2005 10/18/2005 10/18/2010
Nicaragua $175.0 07/15/2005 05/26/2006 05/26/2011
Georgia $395.3 09/12/2005 04/07/2006 04/07/2011
Benin $307.3 02/22/2006 10/06/2006 10/06/2011
Vanuatu $65.7 03/02/2006 04/28/2006 04/28/2011
Armenia $235.7 03/27/2006 09/29/2006 09/29/2011
Ghana $547.0 08/01/2006 02/16/2007 02/16/2012
Mali $460.8 11/13/2006 09/18/2007 08/24/2012
El Salvador $460.9 11/29/2006 09/20/2007 09/20/2012
Mozambique $506.9 07/13/2007 09/22/2008 09/22/2013
Lesotho $362.6 07/23/2007 09/17/2008 09/17/2013
Morocco $697.5 08/31/2007 09/15/2008 09/15/2013
Mongolia $284.9 10/22/2007 09/17/2008 09/17/2013
Tanzania $698.1 02/17/2008 09/17/2008 09/17/2013
Burkina Faso $480.9 07/14/2008 07/31/2009 07/31/2014
Namibia $304.5 07/28/2008 09/16/2009 09/16/2014
Senegal $540.0 09/16/2009 09/23/2010 09/23/2015
Moldova $262.0 01/22/2010 09/01/2010 09/01/2015
Philippines $433.9 09/23/2010 05/25/2011 05/25/2016
Jordan $275.1 10/25/2010 12/13/2011 12/13/2016
Cabo Verde $66.2 02/10/2012 11/30/2012 11/30/2017
Indonesia $600.0 11/19/2011 04/02/2013 04/02/2018
Malawi $350.7 04/07/2011 09/20/2013 09/20/2018
Zambia $354.8 05/10/2012 11/15/2013 11/15/2018
Georgia $140.0 07/26/2013 07/01/2014 07/01/2019
El Salvador $277.0 09/30/2014 09/09/2015 09/09/2020
Liberia $256.7 10/02/2015 01/20/2016 1/20/2021
Ghana $498.2 08/05/2014 09/06/2016  
Benin $375.0 09/09/2015 06/22/2017  
Morocco $450.0 11/30/2015 06/30/2017  
Niger $437.0 07/29/2016 01/26/2018  
Côte d’Ivoire $524.7 11/07/2017 08/05/2019  
Mongolia $350.0 07/27/2018 03/31/21  
Senegal $550.0 12/10/2018 09/09/21  
Nepal $500.0 09/14/2017    
Burkina Faso $450.0 08/13/2020    

* Please note that the values are the signed compact amounts and do not reflect lower actual expenditures due to early terminations or compact funds not being fully spent, or increased amounts due to extensions in FY 2021 and FY 2022. The table on the following page reflects the net obligations/commitments associated with each compact.

Implementing and Developing Compact Commitments, Obligations and Plan

Commitments and Obligations as of March 2022

Commitments and Obligations (in millions of $)

Country Program

Fiscal Year of Appropriation

2012 & Prior

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

Total

Ghana

25

277

15

316

Benin

16

207

168

391

Morocco

114

1

169

166

11

461

Niger

58

10

379

6

443

Nepal

108

9

69

107

129

77

500

Côte d’Ivoire

53

272

10

26

167

537

Mongolia

100

1

95

154

350

Senegal

21

1

447

81

550

Burkina Faso

17

85

309

39

450

Committed & Obligated

511

504

541

414

512

391

678

390

390

3,997

Plan (in millions of $)

Country Program

Fiscal Year of Appropriation

2012 & Prior

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

Total

Tunisia

124

135

68

138

34

499

Lesotho

145

113

43

300

Timor-Leste

330

90

420

Malawi

27

243

80

350

Kosovo

50

74

76

200

Regional Transport

300

150

450

Regional Energy

200

200

Indonesia

47

403

450

Mozambique

52

248

300

Sierra Leone

Planned

124

145

135

230

585

651

648

651

3,169

Closed Compacts

Closed Compacts as of First Quarter FY 2022 (in millions of $)

Country Program

Fiscal Year of Appropriation

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Total

Armenia

177

177

Benin

302

302

Burkina Faso

475

475

Cabo Verde

109

109

Cabo Verde II

66

66

El Salvador

362

88

450

El Salvador II

8

105

158

271

Georgia

290

24

17

56

387

Georgia II

139

139

Ghana

536

536

Honduras

204

204

Indonesia

49

425

474

Jordan

55

218

273

Lesotho

358

358

Liberia

238

238

Madagascar

86

86

Malawi

208

137

345

Mali

434

434

Moldova

90

16

8

1

9

86

49

259

Mongolia

269

269

Morocco

72

578

650

Mozambique

448

448

Namibia

219

76

296

Nicaragua

113

113

Philippines

385

385

Senegal

433

433

Tanzania

695

695

Vanuatu

65

65

Zambia

332

332

Closed Compacts

891

1,242

1,383

1,400

1,318

574

860

561

642

158

238

9,266

Threshold Program Amounts at Signing and Key Dates (in millions of $)*

Country Threshold Program Amount Signed Completion Date
Burkina Faso $12.9 07/22/2005 09/30/2008
Malawi $20.9 09/29/2005 09/30/2008
Albania $13.9 04/03/2006 11/15/2008
Tanzania $11.2 05/03/2006 12/30/2008
Paraguay $34.6 05/08/2006 08/31/2009
Zambia $22.7 05/22/2006 02/28/2009
Philippines $20.7 07/26/2006 05/29/2009
Jordan $25.0 10/17/2006 08/29/2009
Indonesia $55.0 11/17/2006 12/31/2010
Ukraine $45.0 12/04/2006 12/31/2009
Moldova $24.7 12/15/2006 02/28/2010
Kenya $12.7 03/23/2007 12/31/2010
Uganda $10.4 03/29/2007 12/31/2009
Guyana $6.7 08/23/2007 02/23/2010
São Tomé and Principe $8.7 11/09/2007 04/15/2011
Kyrgyz Republic $16.0 03/14/2008 06/30/2010
Niger $23.1 03/17/2008 12/31/2015
Peru $35.6 06/09/2008 09/30/2012
Rwanda $24.7 09/24/2008 12/31/2011
Albania $15.7 09/29/2008 07/31/2011
Paraguay $30.3 04/13/2009 07/31/2012
Liberia $15.1 07/06/2010 12/15/2013
Timor-Leste $10.5 09/22/2010 03/31/2014
Honduras $15.7 08/28/2013 05/31/2019
Sierra Leone $44.4 11/17/2015 03/31/2021
Guatemala $28.0 04/08/2015 10/31/2021
Kosovo $49.0 09/12/2017  
Togo $35.0 02/14/2019  
The Gambia $25.0 11/16/2021  
Solomon Islands $20.0 01/22/2022  

* Please note that the values are the signed threshold program amounts and do not reflect lower actual expenditures due to early terminations or threshold program funds not being fully spent.

Results of Recently Closed Compacts and Threshold Programs

Guatemala Threshold Program

Overview

On October 31, 2021, MCC concluded the Guatemala Threshold Program, with 93.4 percent of the $28 million budget disbursed. The program’s Education Project ($19.3 million) and Resource Mobilization Project ($5.8 million) aimed to improve opportunities for Guatemalan youth and increase government tax revenues.

The objective of the Education Project was to support efforts undertaken by the Government of Guatemala to implement institutional reforms aimed at improving the quality of secondary education. To advance that objective, the Education Project supported three activities:

  1. Improving the Quality of Education in Support of Student Success
  2. Developing Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET)
  3. Strengthening Institutional and Planning Capacity

Through the technical assistance provided in the Improving the Quality of Education in Support of Student Success Activity, 363 parent organizations were trained to strengthen their role and involvement in school activities, 417 school governments were organized, and 110 educational networks were developed to improve the transition from sixth grade to lower secondary school.

To develop and institutionalize new tools and strategies for job training to better align education offerings with labor market demand, the Developing TVET Activity supported the Government of Guatemala in passing two ministerial resolutions that institutionalized job training models.

The objective of the Strengthening Institutional and Planning Capacity Activity was to strengthen the institutional capacity of the Education Ministry to optimize planning and budget estimates for the equitable provision of quality lower secondary education. The activity created and installed a technological program to manage the competitive recruitment and selection process for hiring lower secondary teachers, a system for payroll auditing, and the National Database and Teacher Professional Development Tracking System.

The Resource Mobilization Project objectives were (1) to support government reforms to increase the availability of resources by improving the efficiency of tax and customs administration and (2) to strengthen the capacity of the government to finance infrastructure via PPPs in order to increase public funding allocated for social investment, especially education. The project supported two activities:

  1. Improving Tax and Customs Administration
  2. Public-Private Partnerships Capacity Strengthening

To strengthen compliance and enforcement control programs, the Improving Tax and Customs Administration Activity developed an application to manage catalogs of the minimum characteristics that must be selected in a declaration for certain segments of goods that are considered sensitive or risky. The program also designed and supported the implementation of a new Value Database tool, launched in June 2018, with two main components: (1) a query tool for consulting historical declared values with indicators to demonstrate the risk of undervaluation and (2) a tool for personnel specialized in sensitive merchandise segments (price analysts), who analyze the behavior of prices, with the aim of offering better indicators in the Value Database. MCC also supported a number of improvements to the model’s data mining, legal compliance and randomized selection methodology to improve customs risk management performance.

The Public-Private Partnerships Capacity Strengthening Activity supported the launch of a bid for a $75 million PPP project to improve, finance, operate and maintain 44 kilometers of the CA-9 Highway between Puerto Quetzal and Escuintla in 2017. In addition to supporting specific public projects during the compact, the PPP activity also focused on strengthening Guatemala’s capacity to continue these activities after the end of the threshold program. To this end, MCC funding (1) helped improve Guatemala’s PPP procedures to enable the government to better prepare PPP projects in the future, (2) provided training to government officials on best practices for developing and managing PPPs, and (3) developed a pipeline of PPP projects for the government and donor organizations to bring to market in the future.

This threshold program experienced significant delays due to the COVID-19 pandemic and was heavily impacted by its effects. While several projects were delayed, the government demonstrated tremendous ownership of the program and commitment to its outcomes by extending and adjusting several projects to adapt to the situation. This commitment was rewarded by the completion of nearly the full scope of the program by its closure in December 2021.

Policy Reforms

To maximize the success and sustainability of the Guatemala Threshold Program, MCC partnered with the Government of Guatemala to implement several reforms.

Education Project

To strengthen the links between industry demand and the technical and vocational skills supplied by the educational system, the minister of education formalized the offering of six new vocational programs. The six new technical degree programs began in January 2019 at 13 educational centers in six departments.

Resource Mobilization Project

To ensure the longevity of MCC investments, the government passed a reform that grants Guatemala’s tax administration entity access to bank records for audits with a court order. Additionally, Guatemala’s tax administration entity has successfully created and staffed a 70-person unit for internal affairs investigations.

Preliminary Outputs
Education Project
  • 17,384 students graduated from MCC-supported education activities
  • 103,632 students participated in MCC-supported education activities
  • 2,851 instructors were trained
  • 219 teachers enrolled in TVET
  • 110 school networks were established
  • 363 action plans for parent councils were established
  • 2,098 teachers and principals enrolled in secondary school teacher degree programs
  • 2,345 teachers and principals participated in learning and practice communities
  • 13,239 school visits were made by management advisors
  • 20,536 school visits were made by pedagogical advisors
  • 3 legal, financial and policy reforms were adopted
  • 7 systems were developed for institutional strengthening at the Ministry of Education
Resource Mobilization Project
  • 788 people were trained in PPP management
  • 1 PPP contract supported by MCC was sent to the Congress for its approval
  • An internal affairs unit was established on August 4, 2016
  • A reasonable doubt system was implemented
  • A system for the technical analysis of goods was implemented
  • A minimum description system was implemented
  • A value database was implemented
Preliminary and Expected Outcomes

Guatemalan youth are better prepared to be successful in the labor market.

Improved efficiency in the tax and customs administration and strengthened capacity to finance infrastructure via PPPs increases the availability of resources and preserves limited public funding for social spending priorities such as education.

Evaluations

The independent impact evaluation for the Education Project, covering the Improving the Quality of Education in Support of Student Success and Strengthening Institutional and Planning Capacity Activities, seeks to measure the effects of the project on students, teachers and schools. MCC contracted Mathematica to conduct the evaluation in September 2016 and approved the evaluation design in April 2018. Mathematica produced a Baseline Report in July 2019, which detailed the situation of the education sector in Guatemala before the investment. The evaluation will compare project areas to control areas to assess the impact of the program. Final data collection will occur in late 2022, with a Final Evaluation Report to follow in 2023. Materials related to the evaluation are posted publicly here: MCC’s Evaluation Catalog.

Compact Modifications

MCC employs a risk-based approach to the management of its portfolio and uses a number of mechanisms to manage projects that face potential major modifications, including the following:

  • Quarterly portfolio reviews of all compacts, with a focus on high-risk projects and activities
  • Early identification of high-risk projects
  • Close collaboration with partner countries to develop plans to prevent, mitigate and manage project restructuring
  • Approval of modifications at the appropriate level

MCC also conducts due diligence on programs in advance of compact signing to increase the reliability of technical, cost and other estimates. During compact development, MCC makes project design modifications to mitigate potential completion risk, currency fluctuations and the potential for construction cost overruns.

The following compacts have used the authority provided by Congress in early 2021 to extend the duration of the compact period as a result of COVID-19 delays:

  • Ghana – MCC’s board approved the extension of the Ghana II Compact by nine months, to June 6, 2022, and allocated an additional $7,651,395 in MCC funding to cover program administration and related oversight costs associated with extending the compact’s term.
  • Morocco – MCC’s board approved the extension of the Morocco II Compact by nine months, to March 31, 2023, and allocated an additional $10,500,000 in funding to cover program administration and related oversight costs associated with extending the compact’s term.
  • Benin – MCC’s board approved an extension of the Benin II Compact end date until June 22, 2023. MCC will provide an additional $16,000,000 to fund administrative and oversight functions during the 12-month extension.
  • Niger – MCC’s board approved the extension of the Niger Compact by 12 months, to January 26, 2024, and allocated an additional $5,600,000 in funding to cover program administration and related oversight costs associated with extending the compact’s term.
  • Côte d’Ivoire – MCC’s board approved the extension of the Côte d’Ivoire Compact by 12 months, to August 5, 2025, and allocated an additional $12,000,000 in funding to cover program administration and related oversight costs associated with extending the compact’s term.

Projected Beneficiaries and Income Benefits by Compact

Under MCC’s results framework, beneficiaries are defined as individuals and all members of their households who will experience an income gain as a result of MCC’s projects. MCC considers that the entire household will benefit from the income gain, and counts are multiplied by the average household size in the area or country. The beneficiary standard makes a distinction between individuals participating in a project and individuals expected to increase their income as a result of the project. Before signing a compact, MCC estimates the expected long-term income gains through a rigorous cost-benefit analysis. MCC may reassess and modify its beneficiary estimates and/or the present value of benefits when project designs change during implementation.

Compact1 Estimated Number of Beneficiaries2 Estimated Net Benefits Over the Life of the Project (Present Value)3
Armenia 428,000 $150,400,000
Benin 14,059,000 $140,400,000
Benin II 1,969,000 $24,800,000
Burkina Faso 1,181,000 ($123,300,000)
Cabo Verde 385,000 $84,600,000
Cabo Verde II 604,000 $72,000,000
Côte d’Ivoire 11,300,000 $493,100,000
El Salvador 706,000 $262,100,000
El Salvador II 6,446,000 N/A
Georgia 143,000 $166,000,000
Georgia II 1,770,000 $18,200,000
Ghana 1,217,000 $520,400,000
Honduras 1,705,000 $252,500,000
Indonesia 1,700,000 $5,500,000
Jordan 3,000,000 $89,300,000
Lesotho 1,041,000 $75,500,000
Liberia 528,000 $8,000,000
Madagascar 480,000 $46,800,000
Malawi 983,000 $234,100,000
Mali 2,837,000 $136,300,000
Moldova 414,000 ($66,700,000)
Mongolia 2,058,000 $54,500,000
Mongolia II 2,430,000 N/A
Morocco 1,695,000 $610,200,000
Morocco II 828,000 N/A
Mozambique 2,685,000 $120,900,000
Namibia 1,063,000 $133,800,000
Nicaragua 119,000 $11,500,000
Niger 3,888,000 $238,700,000
Philippines 125,822,000 $159,700,000
Senegal 1,550,000 $110,600,000
Senegal II 12,800,000 N/A
Tanzania 5,425,000 $775,400,000
Vanuatu 39,000 N/A
Zambia 1,200,000 $62,200,000
Total for All Compacts 214,498,000 $4,867,500,000

Notes:

1. The table includes estimates for compacts that have entered into force and have economic rates of return (ERRs) from which income benefit calculations can be drawn. The Ghana II Compact’s ERRs have undergone revision and have not yet been published.

2. These estimates do not include the projected beneficiaries of projects or activities that have been terminated or suspended by MCC (Armenia, Honduras, Madagascar, Mongolia and Nicaragua). In the case of Madagascar, the estimates account for the compact’s early termination.

3. The present value (PV) of benefits is the sum of all projected benefits accruing over the life of the project, typically 20 years, evaluated at a 10 percent discount rate. Estimates are reported in millions of U.S. dollars in the year that the ERR analysis was completed. Because the PV of benefits uses a discount rate, these figures cannot be compared directly to the undiscounted financial costs of MCC compacts but must be compared to the PV of costs instead.

4. Benin II entries are unavailable for one project, an off-grid clean energy facility. Indonesia entries are currently available for only one of three projects. Liberia entries are currently available only for one project, an energy project.

Evaluation-Based Economic Rates of Return

All MCC projects are independently evaluated, and these independent evaluations increasingly allow MCC to generate estimates of economic rates of return (ERRs) based on evaluations. Independently calculated ERRs complement the closeout ERRs that MCC calculates at the end of each compact. Because independent evaluations occur two to five years after compact closure, evaluation-based ERRs offer an updated assessment of a project’s costs and benefits post-compact. These ERRs still rely in part on forecasted benefits, given the 20-year time span over which MCC investments are assessed. Nonetheless, independent evaluation-based ERRs complete the accountability loop in a way that is rare among donors. MCC expects to have completed 35 evaluation-based ERRs by the end of FY 2022. Five examples are included in the table below.

Country

Project

Year Final Evaluation Report Published

Original ERR

Independent Evaluation-Based ERR

Explanation

Indonesia

Green Prosperity: On-Grid Renewable Energy Grant Portfolio

2019

Between 27% and 30% over 20 years

Between 13% and 42% over 20 years

The original ERR for the three biogas grants was an average of 27%, while the average ERR for the hydro grant was 30%. The independent evaluation of the three biogas grants found ERRs of 42%, 30% and 37%, while the ERR for the hydro grant was estimated at 13%. The main driver of the lower ERR for the hydro grant was a policy shift that reduced the amount of power that could be purchased from the grantees.

Ghana

Community Services – WASH

2017

20.5% over 20 years

6.6% over 20 years

The updated model used for the evaluation-based cost-benefit analysis (CBA) was refined to include more up-to-date estimates of disease reduction, time savings, deterioration rates, inflation, population growth and spillover effects. The model was also modified to assume that some benefits affect only water collectors, rather than the whole population. This, in turn, lowered the overall calculated ERR.

Ghana

Community Services – Education

2015

12.1% over 35 years

Between 9.1% and 11% over 20 years

The updated CBA model used adjusted assumptions around incorporating the costs of preventive maintenance at schools, as well as external factors that adversely affect school facilities (such as break-ins). These adjustments resulted in a lower overall ERR.

Philippines

KALAHI-CIDSS Community Development Grants

2018

12.6% over 20 years

3% over 20 years

While program investments in roads, water and education produced large gains, these gains were offset by very large losses in rice productivity. If these rice losses are excluded, the project’s ERR rises to 28%.

Mozambique

Farmer Income Support

2016

25.1% over 20 years

16.8% over 20 years

The evaluation-based ERR was lower than originally forecast due to higher observed disease prevalence rates and lower seedling survival rates in treatment areas relative to comparison areas than originally expected.

Compact Funding by Sector

Pie chart of compact funding by sector

As of First Quarter FY 2022

MCC Results

Implementation Results by Sector

MCC develops tailored monitoring and evaluation plans for each program and country, together with its in-country partners. Within these country-specific plans, MCC uses common indicators to standardize measurement and reporting in key investment sectors. See below for a subset of common indicators that summarize implementation achievements across all programs in MCC’s key investment sectors as of December 2021.

Sector Common Indicator Cumulative Achievement Active and Closed
Programs Tracked

Agriculture and Irrigation

Farmers trained

407,139 Armenia, Burkina Faso, Cabo Verde I, El Salvador I, Ghana I, Honduras, Indonesia, Madagascar, Mali, Moldova, Morocco I, Mozambique, Namibia, Nicaragua, Niger

Farmers who have applied improved practices as a result of training

126,837 Armenia, Burkina Faso, Cabo Verde I, El Salvador I, Ghana I, Honduras, Madagascar, Mali, Moldova, Nicaragua, Niger

Enterprises that have applied improved techniques

1,016 Armenia, Burkina Faso, El Salvador I, Ghana I, Madagascar, Moldova, Morocco I

Hectares under improved irrigation

203,963 Burkina Faso, Cabo Verde I, Ghana I, Honduras, Mali, Moldova, Morocco I, Senegal I

Education

Educational facilities constructed or rehabilitated

844 Burkina Faso, El Salvador I, El Salvador II, Georgia II, Ghana I, Mongolia I, Namibia

Instructors trained

10,621 Burkina Faso, El Salvador I, El Salvador II, Georgia II, Mongolia I, Morocco I

Students participating in MCC-supported education activities

291,165 Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, El Salvador I, El Salvador II, Georgia II, Ghana I, Mongolia I, Morocco I, Namibia

Graduates from MCC-supported education activities

62,938 Burkina Faso, El Salvador I, Georgia II, Mongolia I, Morocco I, Namibia

Land

Legal and regulatory reforms adopted

135 Burkina Faso, Cabo Verde II, Ghana I, Lesotho, Madagascar, Mongolia I, Morocco II, Namibia

Land administration offices established or upgraded

399 Burkina Faso, Cabo Verde II, Ghana I, Lesotho, Madagascar, Mali, Mongolia I, Mozambique

Land rights formalized

320,722 Burkina Faso, Cabo Verde II, Lesotho, Mongolia I, Mozambique, Namibia, Senegal I

Parcels corrected or incorporated in land system

357,900 Burkina Faso, Cabo Verde II, Ghana I, Lesotho, Mongolia I, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Senegal I

Energy

Megawatts of generation capacity added

113 Indonesia, Liberia, Malawi

Megavolt amps of substation capacity added

1,703 Ghana II, Liberia, Malawi

Kilometers of electricity lines upgraded or built

5,986 El Salvador I, Ghana I, Ghana II, Indonesia, Liberia, Malawi, Tanzania

Customer connections added

44,507 El Salvador I, Indonesia

Transportation

Kilometers of roads completed

3,035 Armenia, Burkina Faso, Cabo Verde I, El Salvador I, Georgia I, Ghana I, Honduras, Mali, Moldova, Mongolia I, Mozambique, Nicaragua, Philippines, Tanzania, Vanuatu

Temporary jobs created in road construction

52,472 Burkina Faso, El Salvador II, Ghana I, Moldova, Mozambique, Senegal I, Tanzania

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene

Individuals trained in social and behavior change

73,116 Cabo Verde II, El Salvador I, Ghana I, Indonesia, Mozambique, Zambia

Sanitation facilities constructed

32,831 Cabo Verde II, Indonesia, Lesotho, Mozambique

Kilometers of water pipelines constructed or replaced

1,661 Cabo Verde II, Jordan, Lesotho, Sierra Leone Threshold Program, Zambia

Millions of liters per day of water production capacity added

258 Jordan, Liberia, Tanzania

* 2005-present

Independent Evaluations

MCC commissions independent evaluations, conducted by third-party evaluators, for every project it funds. These evaluations hold MCC and its partner countries accountable for the achievement of intended results and produce evidence and learning to inform future programming. The evaluations investigate the quality of project implementation, the achievement of the project objectives and other targeted outcomes, and the cost-effectiveness of the project.

The graphs below present the number of interim and final independent evaluation reports that MCC has published, by sector, as of December 2021. Impact evaluations estimate changes in outcomes that are attributable to MCC investments. Performance evaluations estimate the contribution of MCC investments to changes in outcomes.

Final Evaluation Reports Published by Sector

Interim Evaluation Reports Published by Sector

The following table lists the eight interim and final independent evaluation reports published by MCC in 2021 and links to the Evaluation Briefs, which summarize the evaluation’s key results and learning in a user-friendly format.

Evaluation Report Evaluation Stage Key Finding Date Published
Senegal Roads Rehabilitation Project Final Evaluation Report Final Reduced travel times have not yet led to reduced transport costs for users December 9, 2021
Zambia Municipal Utility Operations Monitoring Sub-Activity Final Evaluation Report Final Regular water quality monitoring highlights the need for improved treatment December 6, 2021
Senegal Irrigation and Water Resources Management Project Final Evaluation Report Final Land under cultivation and horticulture have grown but not to expected levels September 1, 2021
Mongolia Peri-Urban Land Leasing Activity Final Evaluation Report Final Exclusive-use land rights, wells and training have led to improved rangeland management April 10, 2021
Burkina Faso Agricultural Development Project Final Evaluation Report Final Agricultural incomes have improved but economic benefits have fallen short of expectations April 7, 2021
Malawi Infrastructure Development Project Final Evaluation Report Final The national grid has been modernized, but challenges with reliable power supply continue March 1, 2021
Liberia Roads Project Interim Evaluation Report Interim Strengthened capacities and ring-fenced funding are required for road maintenance October 22, 2021
Mongolia Property Rights Project Interim Evaluation Report Interim Land registration has increased in program and non-program areas January 30, 2021

FY 2022 Corporate Goals

MCC established five specific goals for FY 2022 that informed annual department and division goal setting (as well as individual performance plans):

  1. Design, deliver and evaluate high-quality compact, threshold and regional programs

    Identify, track and achieve key milestones in a timely manner with partner countries to develop, implement and evaluate compact, threshold and regional programs on schedule.

  2. Accelerate the drive to achieve quality economic growth that is sustainable, inclusive and private sector–led
    • Address climate change: Consistent with MCC’s Climate Strategy, further incorporate climate change risks and opportunities into the identification, design, assessment, implementation and evaluation of MCC programs and projects.
    • Integrate inclusion and gender: Identify, design and implement opportunities to expand structurally excluded groups’ ability to access, participate in and/or derive benefits from MCC programs and projects, as defined in MCC’s Inclusion and Gender Strategy.
    • Catalyze private investment: Identify, design and implement opportunities to crowd in private investment in and around MCC programs and projects to maximize scale and impact, including through U.S. Government agencies such as DFC, USAID and the State Department.
  3. Enhance MCC’s and accountable entities’ agility and responsiveness to countries’ development needs and boost operational efficiencies and effectiveness in programs
    • Shorten compact development timelines: Identify, design and implement solutions to significantly shorten compact development timelines (from selection to signing and from signing to entry into force) while maintaining MCC’s quality project design with clear metrics to evaluate risks, success and impact.
    • Enhance, streamline and modernize MCC’s operations to increase impact and resilience and better manage risk.
    • Promote innovation and learning around program implementation for MCC.
    • Strengthen local implementing organizations’ ownership of programs and accountability for implementation and results.
  4. Refine MCC’s human capital and resource capabilities and foster a diverse, equitable, inclusive culture

    More effectively recruit, deploy and retain resources to realize MCC’s mission and achieve program objectives, including the ability to scale and resource MCC programs and projects in light of their evolving scope and impact.

  5. Prepare for MCC@20 to deliver high impact

    The aforementioned Corporate Goals will help lay the foundation for a relevant and high-impact MCC@20. In addition, specific work is required on where MCC can have the most impact in pursuing its mandate, how to strengthen agency positioning and partnerships and any necessary enhancements to its model for the future.

Compact, Threshold Program and Eligible Countries